Video: #WindhamProject Part 1 | The RMCS 4 Review

#WP Part 1

The #WindhamProject is a Windham Weaponry RMCS-4 AR which is chambered in 5.56, .300BLK, 7.62x39mm, 9mm and .22lr. We have grabbed some of the most awesome parts of the gun industry to help us better customize this rifle and show you how you can turn this rifle from something awesome to something EPIC and drool worthy at the range.

Table of Contents:

00:04 Intro to the #WindhamProject
01:34 History of the RMCS-4
02:20 Sponsors of the #WindhamProject
03:27 5.56x45mm and the CMMG .22LR kit
10:37 .300BLK
15:10 7.62x39mm Using the AK Mags
22:59 9MM using the Colt SMG Mags
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A Six Sided Review Of Hexmags

Introduction

If you haven’t heard about or seen Hexmag’s by now you are missing out. For those of us who shoot AR style rifles or platforms that use AR style mags, know we have a large market when it comes to magazines. With manufacturers such as Magpul, Lancer, Surefire and X Products, we have an option, not only in companies but also in style, capacity and material.

A Six Sided Review Of Hexmags

I had seen and used a few Hexmag’s prior to requesting a few for review from Hexmag. I am fond of polymer mags for the simple reason: there are never any failures to feed due to metal on metal friction when firing steel cased ammo.

Reliability

As I said, my personal most common Failure To Feed (FTF also failure to fire) is caused because I prefer to use steel cased ammo to do my reviews. My OOW Browning 1919 hates steel cased, ironically my SUREFIRE 60 round casket mag is about as good as a paperweight when loaded with steel cased and on hot days my C Products Defense mags will stick every 100 rounds or so. My only metal mag that does not care is my X Products X-15 Drum. Being in Texas, if I want a mag to function 99% of the time, I am left with no options but to mostly use polymer mags.

Hexmag is an all polymer body and follower with a steel spring.   This means for me, that I have a mag that doesn’t care what ammo it is feeding and just wants to keep running.

In my testing, I never had a single FTF, much less a single hiccup in the 3000+ rounds we have fired using these mags.

Grip Tape, Accessories and Design

Hexmag, as you can see, has a hexagonal pattern on the body of the mag. This goes in the opposite direction of most mags, that use the “waffle” design. Damn… now I am hungry for a Belgian waffle.

Belgian Waffle FS2000

HEXMAG ORANGE

As more people are now training and using “tactical” gear, I am noticing a trend of more companies offering better grips for everything from pistols to magazines. I haven’t gotten into this trend. I have reviewed a grip tape for my Glock 21 and as I said back then it just isn’t something I care about. I do know however that to a lot of people, it does matter. Hexmag has jumped on the bandwagon early and is just straight up offering the die cut (or whatever the proper term might be for precut) grip tape that matches the hexagonal shapes on their awesome mags.

You might be sitting there thinking, what kind of accessories might they offer? I mean Magpul offers their Magpul and ranger plates so what really could Hexmag offer that is even worth talking about?  Yup I am talking about multiple colors for the follower and base plate button release.

WHAT!?! GAME CHANGER! I mean who doesn’t want “Panther Pink” AR mag parts? I know I don’t!… Wait, I do like this idea… hold up. By having my mags color coded I can identify my match grade bench ammo and my M193 ammo without worrying about getting my mags mixed up? I’m in!

 

Shut-Up-And-Take-My-Money-1024x1280

The “HexID System” is pretty smart. You are not painting your magazines but you have an easy identifier to tell you what you are shooting. Some of us might not even think we would need or use this until we have them.

I shoot mostly steel case but I know on more than one occasion, I have been testing different ammo and needed to keep my loaded mags marked, so I know what I was working on. I also have experienced a few times where I have been running .300Blackout and 5.56x45mm guns on the same table using the same mag brands. We have to keep everything separated so we never cross mags in the guns.

HEXID SYSTEM

hex-id-mags

Testing

I want to tell you about all the amazing testing that we did. I drove over the magazine. That’s it. Oh and I shot 3000+ rounds using only 2 Hexmags over the course of 5 hours.

Yeah.

HEXMAG TRUCK TEST DAMAGE

Color options

HOLY BANANAS! They have 4 different colors to choose from and each color is more exciting than the last! They offer black, a tan-ish black, a lighter hue of black (some of ya’ll less “fashion forward” as I might call “dark gray”), and amazing tint of olive black that is so olive black you might even call it an olive drab.

hexmag_cover-670x446

Conclusion

Would I recommend Hexmag? Maybe. I don’t know… let me turn it back on you! Do you like interchangeable followers and base plate buttons to help you ID your mag from a mag pouch? What about mags that can withstand a Ford F250 loaded to bear with guns and gear driving over mags while on crushed rock that will stand up to the test and not bend or break? What about four different colors of black on AWESOME mags? I am not trying to sway your opinions of Hexmag. I just personally think there is one more 30 round polymer mag on that market that can stand next to someone like Magpul.

Seriously, 3000+ rounds over the course of 5 hours and I didn’t experience a single problem. We drove over one of the mags mid way through testing and still no hiccups.  Excuse me now, I am adding some Hexmags to my Christmas wish list.

Meade Wilderness In Full Scope

Meade Instruments Wilderness™ Spotting Scope – 20-60x100mm Review

Meade Instruments Wilderness™ Spotting Scope - 2060x100mm Review

The Prologue

While visiting with one of my cousins on a recent layover in Dallas, we started talking about her sister who works for Meade Instruments in the marketing department. I went home and checked out Meade’s site. I had found they had a few sporting optics. I wondered why I had never heard of Meade before. I explored the website further and I looked into their sports optics. I found their target audience to lean more in the general sporting optics needs and astronomy.

I called my cousin and she set me up with a Meade Instruments Wilderness 20-60x100mm spotting scope. I requested the largest scope they make because we are trying to see 6 to 8mm holes at 200 yards. My general rule of thumb is, the bigger the optic the better chance of making out what we just hit.

Specs

  • Meade high-quality, 20-60 power, zoom porro prism binoculars deliver years of use.
  • Large 100mm objective gathers plenty of light for bright detailed images.
  • All Wilderness spotters feature high index BaK-4 prisms and high-quality, precision ground lenses that are coated with multiple layers of anti-reflection coatings to provide optical performance that is equal to, or better than any spotting scope in its class.
  • Each Wilderness spotting scope features a sliding sunshade to further reduce glare.
  • A rugged rubber armor covering protects your Wilderness spotting scope from abrasions and damage from regular use.
  • All Wilderness Series spotting scopes are waterproof, fog-proof, and nitrogen purged to ensure many years of performance regardless of the environment.
  • All Wilderness spotting scopes come standard with the soft case and camera adapter (requires T-Mount, not included).

I asked if they manufactured any of the scope parts or glass in the United States and sadly the answer is no as they manufacture in Mexico and China.

Testing

I used this scope during all of our range trips as well as during the September 2015 blood moon eclipse. We were fortunate enough to be able to see that event clearly here in Texas.

Meade Blood Moon

I own only one tripod. All of the others are owned by Clay, our videographer. My tripod is a super expensive one, a $9 deal, that I picked up on Amazon a few years back. I have only used cameras with this tripod prior to this and it had always been fine for that use.

This tripod however did not work well with the Meade Instruments spotting scope. The weight and balance of the Meade scope needs a better built tripod. With that said, the only time this was a big problem was when we used it for the lunar eclipse. Trying to keep the scope centered on the moon was challenging.

Meade Instruments Review

During all of our range trips, the scope was clear and crisp when defining each shot taken at 200yds. We only ran into trouble using it to define each hole in the paper at 300yds.

Final Thoughts

If you are planning on using this scope I would recommend a stronger tripod first and foremost. The scope performed well for us up to 200yards and that was our max. The MSRP is $380. I found the price of this scope to be about $260 online, which is a fair price in my opinion, for the quality of the scope. The scope comes with a carrying bag. As someone who had to carry out two trucks worth of gear for an average range day, I would definitely want to replace the bag with a hard case with foam. I like to keep my gear protected.

The November Glocktoberfest Review

A Glock 30 Short Frame Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

I like the idea of not trying to be in the first wave of bloggers to review a firearm. I prefer to wait a year after a product comes out to review it because it means I have a chance to request to spend more time with a firearm. That way I get to know it more mindfully without worrying about the other reviewers waiting in the long line to test a firearm out.

I own a few Glocks and my favorite of all of them is my Gen 2 G21 .45ACP 13 round pistol. I requested the Glock 30SF for review about 5 months back, after seeing it at SHOT Show 2014. I have always been someone who loves the .45ACP over just about any other pistol cartridge, because of the size of the round.

GLOCK 30SF

I like knowing I have the power and punch that comes with the .45ACP cartridge. The old saying about carry a bigger stick comes to mind. I do not believe that this love of the .45acp  affects or deters my abilities to do my job when looking at different calibers with an objective view point. Let’s face it, they are all fun to shoot.

Glock 30SF Specs

Caliber: .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol)
Length: 6.88”
Width: 1.27”
Height: 4.80”
Barrel Length: 3.77”
Trigger Pull: 5.5 pounds
Mag Capacity: 10 rounds (standard) 13 Rounds (using Glock 21 mags)

Shooting

As I said, I requested more time with this gun to get 1 or 2 more rounds down range. This brought my round count to around 2500 rounds of ball and jacketed hollow points. I never holstered this pistol, as I use a large frame drop leg holster at the range.

When I first pulled the Glock 30 SF out of the box, the empty mags wouldn’t drop freely. I loaded the mags with 10 rounds each and fired all 20 rounds. After that, they had no problem falling free when I hit the mag release.

The Size

My groupings were better when I was running my Glock 21 mags out of the pistol because I had more real estate to grip the gun with allowing for better control. The 10 round mags just barely allowed for my pinky to be on the gun, not giving me as tight of a grip. The difference was a stray round left or right after shooting a few mags.

GLOCK SF

Cleanings

Normally I don’t worry about keeping review guns clean after every range trip. I like to see how they handle and if they slow down as they get dirtier. I didn’t do that with the Glock 30SF because I didn’t feel there was a need to test something that had been shown for years that even dirty, they work.

I cleaned the gun after every range day and the most rounds put through it at any one time was 800 rounds of Federal American Eagle Pistol .45 ACP 230 Grain FMJ which in my opinion is decently “clean” ammo compared to the Wolf and Tula Steel case. There was just really no good reason to torture test this pistol. When I opened it up, I saw exactly what I expected.

Ammo Used

One thing I have always noted with Glock is that they typically will shoot any brand or ammo type I run through them. I tested a box of brand new Tula steel case. After 5 light primer strikes without any ignition I switched the ammo to my 1911 and didn’t have any problems with the ammo. I have seen this problem before using the Wolf barrel on my Glock 21. However, when using the factory barrel, this was never an issue. I believe this was caused by the Tula primers being seated deeper than spec.

The brands I used:

· Federal (230 Grain ball)

· Wolf Polyformance (230 Grain ball)

· HPR JHP (230 Grain Jacketed hollow point)

· Monarch Brass (230 Grain ball)

· Monarch Steel (230 Grain ball)

· CCI Blazer Aluminum (230 Grain ball)

· Monarch Brass (185 Grain JHP)

· And a few other brands from people who shot the gun with ammo they brought.

In The Box

1 Glock 30SF
2 10 Round Factory Mags
2 Spent brass from the proofing department at Glock
1 “speed” Loader
1 .45 caliber nylon bore brush
1 Plastic Cleaning rod
Paperwork
1 cable lock

The “Speed” Loader

The speed loader they ship is a good thought, in theory, but in my hands it was slow and frustrating to use.  I was always faster hand loading each mag than using the speed loader provided.

Speed Loader

When trying to load the .45s into the magazine you still have to push the previous round down as the loader doesn’t offer enough room for the brass to slide in. The efforts are almost that of hand loading the mag without the use of your thumb on the round. This seems like more procedure and steps to just load one round.  

I do own a Maglula for pistols I found that I was faster using that then by hand.  The speed loader isn’t bad; it just did not work well for me. A few of the other crew members had better luck with it. Everyone did agree, in the end that the Maglula was the fastest.

My Sister and the .45

After getting out of college, my father and I figured if my sister was going to be living alone she needed a pistol to keep at her place. My sister has grown up around guns. She enjoys shooting with me every now and then.

She likes my Glock 21 and is a fairly decent shot with it. I did not want to part with my Glock 21. When I heard one of my friends was selling his Glock 22, I jumped on it and picked it up for a really great price.  I thought about giving it to her, but I just like it too much.

My sister has always lived within a 40 minute drive from my folks so we were never worried about her. Recently she has been looking for another job outside of the state. She has also been expressing more and more interest in getting her conceal carry.

I looked at a few pistols for her but it always came back to wanting the .45acp. I view conceal carry pistols as something you should WANT to shoot. If you enjoy shooting it, you are more likely to train more with it than something you just carry because you were told to.

I have taken her to the range with us a number of times to get some trigger time with this pistol and her comment is always the same “so this is my new gun right”?  “You are letting me keep this one because it fits me and I like it”

For Christmas I have ordered a Glock 30SF for her but now I am sitting here wishing I had ordered one for myself. You just can’t have too many guns, right???

Light Rail

The Glock 30SF has a rail for a light or laser mount. I don’t currently own any pistol lights or lasers due in part to the fact that I haven’t found one that has sparked my interest yet. I honestly haven’t looked that hard either. I am always open to recommendations.

The Recoil

I would equate the recoil to that of the larger Glock 21. This surprised me the first time I shot it as I was expecting a little harsher recoil. Later, I put one in each hand (the 21 and the 30SF) and I could feel that were pretty close to the same weight.  I guess I should not have been surprised.

Conceal Carry Note

At this time in my life I do not conceal carry. 90% of the time I leave the house, the place I am going will not allow me to enter with a pistol. This makes for a tough choice for me, do I carry in my truck and risk someone breaking into the truck because it is older or do I leave my gun at home and just pray I am never in a place where I need it?  I tend to keep my gun at home. One of the crew members is a police officer and I am normally within arm’s length of him. On top of that I live in a good area with very low crime.

Accuracy

I want to tell you that my shot groups looked like I only hit the target with one round. The truth is, even if the gun was that accurate I am not that skillful. The subcompact design is not meant for competition shooters, it is meant for conceal carry. In a conceal carry situation you are not going to try and engage the target at 300 yards like you see in the movies. This pistol, for me, was just as accurate as any of my other Glocks. I can hit a man size silhouette at 50 yards.

Glock 21 Mag

Final Thoughts

I have been a fan of Glocks’ for years (I know, you couldn’t tell). The subcompact Glock 30 SF is just another in a long line of quality pistols they are known for. While picking up this pistol from my FFL I was asked if I wanted to purchase their Glock 43 Single Stack 9mm. My only comment was, why mess with 9mm when you can have the power of a .45acp?

I wish I could get more range time with this pistol just because it is fun to shoot. If you get the chance to send some lead down range running this pistol I highly recommend it.

Gift Giving Suggestions

As said earlier in this article, I will be gifting this gun to my sister. That being said, she has shot many different calibers and pistols. She knows how to handle her firearm and herself. She knows she prefers Glocks. This was an easy choice for me.

As it is getting closer to the holiday season I would like to add this word of advice to anyone thinking about buying any pistol as a gift. If the person you are purchasing for owns a lot of firearms as it is and you know for fact they are comfortable with different pistols, go for it. If not, please think about taking them to a store and seeing if they like the pistol first.

I have seen too many couples at the range, where the guy bought a pistol for his significant other without letting her size the gun up first. I see them getting into situations that makes everyone uncomfortable. It can occasionally put them and others in harm’s way since they cannot handle the firearm yet. 

Buying a caliber that someone is not comfortable with shooting yet can cause people to be turned off by shooting. It can even cause them to mishandle the firearm and put themselves and other people in a dangerous situation.

Introducing someone to a firearm first is always the safer bet so they get a chance to have some hands on time. They can say whether they like the weight and if they like how the gun shoots. I know you are not always able to test first a gun before you buy it, but it is worth renting that caliber firearm first. I strongly recommend letting the gift receiver try it out at the range to see how they respond. This is always a smart idea. Firearms make a wonderful gift, just make sure it’s a wonderful experience.

Steel

    Nikon Monarch 3 6-24×50 SF Matte BDC Review

    I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

    I had no clue Nikon made sport optics prior to going to my first SHOT Show. I only knew Nikon as the company who had made my last 3 digital cameras and outside of that I really didn’t know anything else.

    The Nikon Monarch 3 6-24×50 SF Matte BDC

    Nikon Monarch 3 6 24x50 Matte BDC Review

    Specs

    •       Magnification: 6-24x
    Objective Diameter: 50mm
    Exit Pupil: 2.1-8.3mm
    Field of View: 4.2-16.8 ft @ 100 yds
    Tube Diameter – Other: 1 in
    Eye Relief: 4in
    Objective Outside Diameter: 57.3mm
    Eyepiece Outside Diameter: 44mm
    Weight: 20.5 oz
    Overall Length: 15.5 in
    Adjustment Graduation – Other: 1/8 in
    Max Internal Adjustment: 30 MOA
    Parallax Setting – Other: 50 yds – ∞
    Side Focus: Yes
    Waterproof/Fogproof: Yes
    Spot On Custom Turret: Yes
    Parallax Adjustment: Yes
    Matte Finish: Yes
    Use: Centerfire Long Range
    Reticle: BDC (Bullet Drop Compensator)
     
     
     

    The Rifle and Scope Combo

    I am not a distance shooter, but I enjoy the time spent practicing. With that said, I do not at this time, see a reason for me to spend $10,000 on a rifle and optics because I don’t shoot farther than 400 yards.
    I just need a good bolt action and clear optic that will let me see 400 yards. I have mounted this Nikon Monarch 3 6-24×50 SF Matte BDC on my Mossberg ATR .308 which came with a inexpensive optic. The scope that came with the Mossberg was okay and worked out to 200 yards but it just was not a good scope for anything past that.
    I wanted a scope to replace the old one and let me ring the gong at a distance.

    In the Box

    Nikon does not want to just give you the normal scope and paperwork. They want make sure you, the consumer, get what I like to call: the happy meal.
    Open the box and be happy to see: Monarch 6-24×50 Side Focus Matte BDC, Nikon sunshade, Nikon low-profile adjustments with caps, target-style high profile knobs with caps and tapered easy grip knobs.
    This means the scope comes with the inclusion of two additional sets of turrets.  One set is a high profile (tall) turret for target and tactical shooters, (it includes the appropriate size high profile turret caps). You also get a wider style turret, which gives the shooter more real estate to make quick adjustment (the wider turrets do not come with caps).

    GearsofGuns Monarch3 review

    (Scope not shown due to already being mounted to the rifle)

    The Testing

    While I had wanted to send this scope on an Elk hunt on the Wyoming/Colorado Border. We did not have the time to do this before writing the review.
    We did not put this scope through any durability testing outside of the normal bouncing it gets inside the pelican case in the bed of the trucks on the dirt roads.
    The scope stayed zeroed in every time we pulled it out of the case after driving to the range.

    Bullet Drop Compensator Reticle (BDC)

      Nikon-bdc-reticle-Full

    I like this reticle. Shooting a .308 bolt action using this scope made it easy to shoot at multiple targets at different ranges. 
     

    The Turrets

    If you have not spend much time behind a tube scope, the turrets on the scope are how you adjust for windage and elevation. The benefit to a scope with turrets is that it allows the shooter to zero the rifle to a distance (We will say 100 yards for the sake the explanation) and then reset the turrets MOA markings to the zero mark so you can always return your scope back to the distance you had it zeroed in for.

    imgres

    The turrets are not mushy. Each 1/8 inch click is positive and audible making for very noticeable adjustments.
    Price
    This scope is $699.95 on Nikons’ website, but you can find it online for around $660. The price might not be what a newer shooter would want to spend for their first rifle. For someone who knows how to shoot at longer distance and is looking for a quality scope this price isn’t going to break the bank.
     

    Overall Thoughts

    Nikon has pleasantly surprised me with a clear, easy to use and affordable scope.
    I was very impressed with how clear the glass was. I would say that it is fairly close to the Leupold clarity I have in the multiple scopes I own of theirs.    
    The scope has three different style turrets for different types of shooters which is a big bonus in my book.
    The quality of the scope meet the expectation set by the price.
    I cannot speak to shooting past 400 yards but to that distance I can say this scope was clear and crisp.

    C Products Defense AR-15 Magazine Review

    I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

    I came into this review with an open mind and I hope you do as well. I know this company has had their faults in the past but this review is one I hope lets us move forward.

    I met them at SHOT Show 2013 and it took a year but they finally approved my request for mags for testing. I received six aluminum and six stainless steel 30 round AR mags.

    Testing 

    While I have tested mags in the past by throwing them off towers and dragging them behind golf carts for 10 minutes, I decided this go around I would only test in ways a civilian might damage them. Chances of mags being dragged behind a car or dropped off of a tower are slim (if you don’t account for training courses that teach shooting from the tower).

    We have been testing the mags for 6 months or so now and have shot well over 3000 rounds out of all 12 mags. I used mostly steel cased ammo and they never had one hiccup.  The orange follower is anti tilt.

    The finish has lasted on all of them and show very little signs of wear. I wanted to test them to see if standard wear such as heavy use would give problems. I also wanted to  know what would happen if, god forbid, I forget I have a loaded mag and I drop it and end up driving over it (yes, this has happened during a review and lunch break).   

    Driving over the stainless steel mag caused a small dink in the metal but did not affect the performance of the mag or capacity.  While the whole mag was driven over front to back, the only damage was near the  base plate.

    Crushed C Products Mags

    Stainless Steel Crush view C Products DefenseCrushed Stainless Steel C Products Defense

    The aluminum did not fare as well.

    Side View Aluminum C Products DefenseAluminum C Products Mags

    Even after bending the metal back as best we could, the aluminum mag is not functional and is now just used for display purposes.

    Spot Welds

    The welds on all of the mags look solid and should not remind anyone of Christmas past.

    Spot Welds C Products DefenseSpot welds C Products Defense 2

    Even after the crush test the welds held and seem completely unharmed

    Final Thoughts

    Go into any gun shop and ask enough questions and someone will always tell you about why you should stay away from (fill in the blank) because in 1967 they had (fill in the blank) problem and there for they cannot trust anything new when it comes to (fill in the blank). Look, all I can tell you from my stand point is if you are looking for metal mags and you have no intention of being attacked by a Sharknado or a herd of “I can’t trust polymer guns because in 1943 we used wood…”. C Products Defense mags pass my test.

    Taofledermaus: Bullets vs. a LOT of Hard Drives

    I have been following TAOFLEDERMAUS‘ youtube channel for years and I have always enjoyed the content he has created.  Since I am having hard drive troubles myself right now I would love to just put them down range and blow them to pieces. Sadly I have so much data I have to try and pull from them I will just let Jeff of Taofledermaus do the shooting of his drives and let you enjoy.

    Taofledermaus: Bullets vs. a LOT of Hard Drives

    Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

    I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

    Before I talk about this 1919A4 belt fed firearm I have to talk about Ohio Ordnance Works. I have never met them in person but I can tell you I have the upmost respect for the men and women of this company. Normally when working with a firearm manufacturer I work with one person and if I have any problems they are the only one I can contact to get a problem resolved. This company however is not like that. When I had a problem with the 1919 on a Tuesday morning I did not speak to my contact Bob Conroy I spoke with the owner directly. I will talk more about that a little later on and help further explain why I have to open with these comments.

    Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

    M1919A4 Specs+

    Designed: 1919
    Number built: 5 million
    Variants: A1; A2; A3; A4; A5; A6; M37 and AN/M2
    Weight: 31 lb (14 kg) (M1919A4)
    Length: 37.94 in (964 mm) (M1919A4)
    Barrel length: 24 in (610 mm)
    Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield and 7.62×51mm NATO
    Action: Recoil-operated/short-recoil operation
    Rate of fire: 400–600 round/min
    Feed system: 250-round belt

    The OOW M1919A4 is classified as a belt fed rifle.  The machine gun classification is for full auto only, making this gun a semi auto and available without a NFA tax stamp.

    The Backstory

    As many of you may have already seen and heard, Ohio Ordnance Works has redesigned the BAR and made it their H.C.A.R. (Heavy Counter Assault Rifle). This is a very cool looking rifle but it honestly was not the first thing that peaked my interest when I first came to their website. While scrolling through their guns I saw the semi auto 1919A4 Bundle which is a SEMI AUTO belt fed tripod rifle. Side note: this means you cannot put the sig stabilizing brace on this and turn it into a pistol (I found this out at my FFL holders shop when I told him all the cool kids were making pistols and I wanted one too). When I saw that, the first thing that went through my head was this is AWESOME! who doesn’t want to own a belt fed gun? and that is when I saw the price. $3,997. I honestly figured they would have this priced to be closer to $7000+.   On top of all of that, the gun at the bottom of the page is a 1919A4 with a Cleaning Kit, Manual, Headspace & Timing Gage, and the .308 Trunnion Shield for $2500.

    YOU ARE TELLING ME I CAN OWN A BELT FED RIFLE FOR THE SAME PRICE AS 2.5 AR-15s? Sign me up!

    Let me put two images in your head.

    1. You pull up to the range, get out of your truck, walk to the firing line and pull out the same plain Jane AR-15 that every other shmuck has and shoot it

    or

    2. You pull up to your private range, back up into your bay, unload a 1919 A4 out of your truck and not give a s**t about what anyone else thinks because you own a belt fed tripod rifle of glory?

    That is what I thought.

    OOW 1919A4 Bundle Specs

    Bundle Includes:

    · 1919A4 Semi-Auto

    · Manual

    · Tripod, Pintle, T&E

    · Headspace & Timing Gage

    · Custom Cut Pelican Case

    · 1919A4 Linker

    · Cleaning Kit

    · 1,000 Links

    · Spade Grip

    · .308 Trunion Shield

    · Parts to Convert Gun to .30-06

    · Membership Access to Video Tutorial

    The Bundle

    When my gunsmith got the M1919A4 in he told me he saw the parcel service driver spending more time than normal in the back of the truck so he walked outside to see what the deal was and the driver told him he needed to get his dolly to carry this box into the shop. My gun smith told him that he didn’t need to worry he would just help him carry it in. In his words, “that was a mistake”.

    1919a4_bundle_copy

    The pelican case isn’t grossly over heavy but it’s a long case that is meant to be carried using the handles or rolled using the built in wheels, making it easy to move. In the cardboard box it was heavy and awkward.

    Inside of the custom cut Pelican case the rifle also comes with:
    Manual
    Tripod, Pintle, T&E
    Headspace & Timing Gage
    Cleaning Kit
    Spade Grip
    .308 Trunion Shield
    and Parts to Convert the Gun to .30-06

    You also get:

    1000 Links (they link .308 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield and 8mm cartridges)
    Membership Access to Video Tutorials (this is very important)
    and the 1919A4 Linker

    2015-06-02 19.06.24

    The Ammo

    Our good friends over at Luckygunner.com sponsored the .308 used in this review.
    We used 1000 rounds of 308 Winchester 180 Gr Sp Prvi Partizan

    Be sure to check them out for all your ammo needs.

    Linking

    When the rifle first came in Ohio Ordnance Works was out of stock of the linker so they shipped it without one. The crew and I had plans to get this gun on the range as quick as possible because it was going to rust from all the drooling if we didn’t.

    IMG_5843
    [1000 links in a plastic box I purchased)

    I called over one of the guys to come help me hand load 500 rounds and I can tell you from experience this is a bloody ordeal and I am thankful I never have to do that with this gun ever again. It took two people about an hour of linking to get all the belts made (we made them into 40 round belts.)  When we got the linker in a few days later, it took me 23 minutes by myself to do the same amount.

    IMG_5905

    Shooting

    As I said, we shot 1000+ rounds of .308 through the M1919A4. It was the most fun you can have without full auto.

    IMG_5860

    I tried both the spade grip as well as the standard grip and both of them are fun to shoot. I think I like the standard grip more because it means I don’t have to take the M1919A4 down to put it back in its case… maybe I am just lazy.

    Changing Barrels and Cleaning

    This gun comes with a membership to videos on how to change the barrel and take apart the gun and they do a much better job at explaining this than I can. I will say I have watched the videos every time I have cleaned this gun and when I had to fix the gun to insure I don’t miss anything. The videos are helpful and comprehensive.

    The Problem and the Solution

    On the first range trip, we shot about 250 rounds before I broke the gun. Yes I admit I broke it and I am kind of happy it happened. I have no idea why the detent pin bent but the pin that rides in the channel from the extraction arm bent out of place and stopped the gun from working. Ohio Ordnance Works said, “it was probably a fluke, a wriggling out of place by the pin. We’ve made tons of these and not had an issue like that. They are new/grad A surplus, so you may have found one that just wasn’t perfect.”

    IMG_5861

    I am happy about breaking the gun because of the experience I had afterwards. I hate breaking guns. I know as a reviewer I can be hard on gun but normally we know their limits and where the maximum amount of safe operating abuse is and we err on the side of caution. This however was not abuse. We were still warming the M1919A4 up when it bent.

    This killed the mood at the range. Since this is a review gun and it was a weekday morning I called Ohio Ordnance Works to try and figure out what had happened. I spoke with the young lady who answered the phone and she told me, Bob Conroy wasn’t in the office.  She transferred me to Mr. Landies instead. Under stress, my vocabulary resorts to almost grunting so when Mr. Landies got on the phone and started helping me he was very understanding at my lost of proper terminology and told me that a picture is worth 1000 words or in my case 3 words and a grunt. So I e-mailed a photo of the bent part and he e-mailed me back just a few minutes later asking for a shipping address.

    The following day I had my whole family over for lunch. When I got a knock at my door from the shipper with the part, you might say I was very surprised. I had figured I wouldn’t get this gun fixed for a few days at a minimum, but they overnighted the part to me. This blew me away, no one does that. No one ships you the part overnight unless it is a dire emergency. To say the least, I was impressed.

    About a month ago, while on Instagram, I saw that Ohio Ordnance Works had posted a picture of a gentleman holding a beautiful rifle with the caption of Happy birthday boss… Mr. Landies. As it turns out I wasn’t transferred to some shop floor guy who builds the rifles but to the owner of the company. Again… no one does that.

    After fixing the gun we took it back on the range a few weeks later and the gun ran like a champ. Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 6.28.23 PM

    Final Thoughts

    The gun is battle tested. I never had any doubts that this was a good gun, if it wasn’t, it would not still be in service all over the world.
    While owning this 1919A4 only makes me feel cooler in my head, I know that I will not be taking this out to the range every Sunday. I know that it is a special occasion gun than is very expensive to just play with.

    This is a gun that has a lot of history attached to it and since Ohio Ordnance Works has made this M1919A4 to be as affordable to own as possible I think it is a very nice piece to have in anyone’s collection. Plus, when your friends are bragging that they own a Tavor or a SCAR 17 you can just look at them and say “that’s cute, I own a belt fed tripod rifle”.

    I have been very impressed with this company from the first time I spoke with them on the phone. They have always been very helpful and ready to work with us. I know I say this a lot, but I truly love the gun community. There is, bar none, not a single community with more caring and awesome people.

    Remington R1 Enhanced 1911 Review

    When I was younger I fancied myself a “Glock” man. In all of the debates with my friends I held true to my Glock fandom and that there wasn’t a 1911 on the face of this earth that could sway me. I have grown up a lot since then and I have experienced one or maybe two more guns since I was a youth. As I have matured and become a reviewer, I know that my tastes and knowledge has grown with me. I have been on the hunt for a 1911 that I could put the Atticus James stamp of approval on for about 2 years now, and I can say I have finally found it.

    Remington R1 Enhanced 1911 Review

    Side Story 

    Before I get to reviewing this gun I wanted to share a story with you. As some of you know, I name my guns like they are my children and each firearm has a name that relates to a part of the gun and how it came to be mine.

    On Valentine’s Day 2015, I picked up the Remington R1 1911 and the OOW 1919 (it was my month of ordering firearms designed in the 1900s). I opened the Remington pistols’ hard case and saw the gun for the first time. I instantly knew her name. Cupids Bow (Cupid for short). Because if Cupid was real it wouldn’t carry bow and arrows, it would carry this .45ACP, so when you get hit with love it feels like a Mac truck just hit you. This is how I felt when I first held the Remington R1 Enhanced and again when I first shot this pistol. Love hitting me like a Mac truck.

    2015-05-11 17.33.12

    Specs

    ACTION: Short recoil operation
    CALIBER: .45 ACP
    MAGAZINE CAPACITY: 8+1 (comes with two mags)
    BARREL: 5 in.
    OVERALL LENGTH: 8.5 in.
    OVERALL HEIGHT: 5.5 in.
    GRIPS: Enhanced Wood Laminate
    TRIGGER PULL: 3.5-5 lb.
    WEIGHT: 39.5 oz.
    Price: $940

    First Impressions

    I am not a good shot with pistols at anything farther than maybe 10 feet. I am working at getting my accuracy better but it has taken time. When we first took the Remington R1 Enhanced out to the range we were working in our back bay that goes out to 182 yards. We had been shooting our OOW 1919 out to the 50 yard line. We had to take a break from the 1919 and moved over to pistols for a bit. After shooting about 250 rounds down at the 7 yard with the Remington R1 Enhanced I decided to ring steel at 10y and 25 yards. I felt super confident after ringing in the silhouette at 25 yards. I wanted to try my hand at 50. After about 3 shots of walking up I rang the steel. For some of you this is nothing and I understand that, but for me this was AWESOME!

    Shooting

    When I moved over to the knockdown plate rack I was averaging about 90% hit rate at 10 yards. I let my sister try this pistol out and she noted it was heavy when she first picked it up but after shooting the gun and seeing how the weight helped her follow up shots I think the heaviness didn’t bother her after that. The crew got some time behind the gun and I heard things like “they can take this from my cold dead hands” “dibs” “do you think Atticus would notice it missing if I sneak it under my shirt and take it home”.

    Grips

    I don’t like the prickliness of the grips. I understand the reason being that it adds more slip resistance, but I am not a fan. I found that the screws were loose on the grips when I got the gun. After tightening them they haven’t backed out once.

     2015-05-11 17.28.30

    500 Round Cleaning

    After the first day of shooting, the muzzle was very caked with carbon and powder. I always use M Pro 7 cleaner on my guns and after taking the Remington R1 down and spraying everything with cleaner all the carbon just wipes off and returned the gun to a shiny new-ish gun.

    2000 Round Cleaning

    When shooting the next 1500 round (maybe 200 rounds in) is when we had our first and only failure to fire. I was being bad and using an old box of Tula and I believe the round was just bad. After cleaning the gun it is still shiny and looks new. The fiber optic front sight needed to be cleaned with a q-tip but still is red and very visible .

    Ammo Used

    I have been using Blazer 230 Gr FMJ .45 Auto ammo in my .45s for years now and I have never really had any problems with it. I used 1600 round of Blazer, 50 rounds of Tula Ammo 45 ACP 230 Gr. FMJ Steel Case, 50 rounds of HPR .45 AUTO 230 JHP (the round I used to hit steel at 50 yards) and the last 300 rounds was Monarch brass .45 ACP FMJ.

    Take Down

    Remington ships a plastic barrel bushing wrench with the pistol making the take down easier. The gun takes down just like any other 1911.

    Trigger

    I have a Geissele Super Semi-Automatic Enhanced (SSA-E) Trigger in my AR-15. I have been complimented on this trigger more times than I can remember. The Remington R1 Enhanced Trigger is very similar. The trigger had a little more play left and right then I like but the pull and the reset are crisp and clean. It is like drinking a nice cold glass of water on a hot summer day. This trigger quenches that thirst like very few can.

    2015-05-11 17.28.22

    The Sights

    The adjustable rear sight and fiber-optic front sight (red) make for an easy to see and quick to draw sight picture. Out of the box the pistol was dead on at 25 yards. When holstering this pistol in my drop leg holster I never had any problems with it snagging on the front sight. I never carried this pistol concealed because I do not have a holster to fit this gun.

    2015-05-11 17.31.07

    2015-05-11 17.26.34

    The Hard Case

    In the case, it has a cut out that I could not figure out for the life of me what went there. 2015-05-11 17.37.28

    As it turns out Remington sells a 1911 Multi-tool that fits in that spot

    1911-Multitool_closed

    1911-Multitool

    As to why anyone would store this in the hard case is beyond me but I guess if you are wanting to give this as a gift with the tool included it would make for a nice one piece gift.


    Overall Thoughts

    The Remington R1 Enhanced is a custom factory made gun. Fit and finish on this pistol makes that apparent.

    I loved this gun. I have never shot Remington’s other 1911s but my gunsmith said he has never been happy with them and that he only liked what Remington had done with the R1 Enhanced.

    2000 Rounds and only one issue is good odds. Especially if that was only due to bad ammo.

    At $940 MSRP it is hard to beat the price for a custom gun. While this gun would make for a nice piece to display it is also a firearm you could can shoot day in and day out.

    Editorial: Standardizing vs. Proprietary

    A few weeks back I reviewed a Windham Weaponry .308 AR style rifle. When I finished the review I contacted my local gunsmith as well as Windham and asked if they knew of any standardization in the .308 AR market.  I wanted to know if anyone had made a pattern for the upper and lower as well as the Bolt Carrier Group (BCG).

    standard vs proprietary

    The question seemed straight forward, however the answer isn’t. Long story short, no. No one has made a standard to which everyone is following.

    (Note: I am using the 5.56×45 and the .223 Remington interchangeably in the article even though they are not the same cartridge.  AR stands for Armalite Rifle not Assault Rifle).

    History

    In 1955 and 1956 Armalite designed the first prototypes of the original AR-10 chambered in the 7.62×51 (.308 Winchester.)  By 1957, the first AR-15 using the intermediate cartridge 5.56×45 NATO was designed and then sold to Colt due to financial problems that Armalite was having.

    Is Anything New Anymore?

    Since the AR-10 was designed before the AR-15 it would seem we haven’t taken a step forward but a step back in time. Thanks to Government bans, such as the 1994 Assault Weapon Ban that ended in 2004 and other set backs, the modern sporting rifle world has been trying to play catch up for the past 11 years.

    Intermediate vs. Rifle Cartridges

    I have never really been a fan of the .223 Remington (5.56x45NATO) and I know I am not alone in this distaste. I have always liked the 7.62x39mm or the newer .300 AAC Blackout when it comes to intermediate cartridges. The .308 win is a rifle cartridge that fits more than just the distance shooting bill. The fact of the matter is that the .308 and the 5.56 have been on the battle field for almost the same amount of time and yet we chose the less ballistically versatile round for civilian and military applications.

    DPMS/SR-25 Magazines vs. Proprietary

    When building a new firearm platform you have to consider the way your firearm is going to hold rounds. In the the bolt action world we typically use an in-stock style magazine, for the lever actions and shotguns we use a tube and elevator (shell carrier) system, for the semi and full autos we have a choice. Belt fed (seen mainly in past in full auto only but is making it way back in semi auto versions of full auto machine guns) or magazine fed.

    The .308 ARs are all based on the smaller AR-15, so you would think after seeing the success of the AR-15 magazine market it would be smarter to stick with what works. But we are still in a relearning stage in the firearm world about supply and demand. The FN SCAR 17 uses a proprietary .308 mag but the SCAR 16 uses STANAG (AR-15 style magazines). When FN released the SCAR 17 to the general population they had problems keeping magazines in stock because they were trying to keep the military contracts filled and just they couldn’t keep up with demand. That’s a problem with proprietary.

    The DPMS/SR-25 style magazines are now being made by a number of different magazine manufacturers which means I can order as many as I want.

    Standardizing

    The AR-15 is known as the Legos for adults. Everything is changeable. If I want a nickel boron BCG I can find a company I like and replace mine in my AR-15.  If I want a new charging handle I get one. If I want to put a .50BMG bolt action upper on my lower I can. This seems to me like a great idea. However in the .308 AR world we have yet to reach an agreement as to what the specs should be.

    Final thoughts

    Until they all come to an agreement about standardizing, the consumer market for the .308 AR is left with fewer options.  To me, more options means more money back in the pockets of the firearm manufacturers.  More money to the manufacturers means more money can be spent on R&D, which means more advanced guns in the future.

    Editorial: Modernizing the Wheel vs. Newly Invented

    I was talking with someone the other night about guns (Yes, I do talk about other things than guns… sometimes) when they asked what I thought was the 5 top new innovations were in the industry. This is a topic I have been wanting to write about for a while, I just have never had the words.

    M1 vs SCAR

    When it comes to the gun industry we have cycles we go through. The inventing and learning cycle and what I call the modernizing of the wheel. In the inventing and learning cycle we have invented things like the tube sights for long distance shooting and learned things like rifling. With the modernizing the wheel cycle, which we are currently in, we are just finding ways to make these older designs fit the 21 century.

    In the 1950s and 1960s the .308 Winchester and the .223 Remington made their debut in the in the shooting world and we are still using them as a our standard calibers. The FN-H SCAR is a modernized version of the FAL. The target cameras are the updated version of a spotting scope.

    Don’t get me wrong, I am happy with the advancements we have made. However, I want to see something new. I want to live in a time like my grandfathers era when a lot of new things were introduced.  He saw the explosion of “modern guns with the invention of the  “plastic gun” or “black gun”, He also saw the invention of the standardized 30 round magazines as well as being able to control the muzzle climb with an intermediate cartridge.

    I am not saying we don’t live in a time without people like Eugene Stoner and Mikhail Kalashnikov.  I am just saying we haven’t really seen something that has made a small arms like the M16 or M14 go almost obsolete. We saw the M16 quickly replace the M14 as the US service rifle in the 1960s.

    As strange as it might seem, history shows us that the government is the main reason for innovation and invention in this industry. Until a government demands a new product to suit their new need, we do not see new creations. A government contract can be in the price range of billions which goes towards R&D and eventual release to the general public.

    While some might think with the increased use of drones, it may be a long time before we see anything new.  I am a believer that we will always need boots on the ground, if for no other reason than for intelligence gathering, for aid and for maintaining goodwill.  I am excited and hopeful for the future of our industry.

    Windham Weaponry R16FSFST-308 Review

    For those of you not familiar with Windham Weaponry and would like more history on them, you should visit  The Windham Weaponry Story…

    Windham Weaponry R16FSFST-308 Review

    Introduction to the .308 AR Style Rifle

    I have always preferred the larger .30 caliber round over the 5.56×45. While the military finds the 5.56 round “adequate” it leaves much to be desired for more applications in the civilian market. For everyday plinking the 5.56×45 (.223 Remington) is fine but if I want to take that caliber for other hunting type purposes I might not legally be able.

    The AR-15 style rifle is Legos for the adult world. You can customize it to make some really interesting firearms. With thousands of different products designed for this platform, the possibilities are endless. As each year passes, people are inventing better and better products for the AR.

    The issue that I have with the AR platform is the caliber. While it is true that you can build an AR in every caliber known to man, the staple calibers are the ones we want more of.

    While the AR-10 style rifles have been year for years, The magazines use to be outrageously expensive until the DPMS/SR-25 style mags started getting manufactured by companies who knew how to make great magazines. This was part of what I saw as the awakening of the .308 AR rifles.

    Specs   

    Windham Weaponry R16FSFST-308
    Rifle 16 Shaved Front Site (SIC) w/Telestock (found on the invoice shipped with the rifle) R16SFST-308 L

    Caliber: .308 Win. / 7.62x51mm
    Action: Semi-Automatic, Gas Impingement System
    Capacity:  20 + 1- Ships with one 20 Rd Magpul Magazine (accepts all std. sizes)
    Safety:  Manual Lever with Indicator Markings on Both Sides of Receiver
    Receiver: Flat Top Type Upper w. Mil Std 1913 Rail / QD Sling Sockets in Lower
    Receiver Material: Forged 7075 T6 Aircraft Aluminum with Integral Trigger Guard
    Receiver Finish: Hardcoat Black Anodize Finish
    Bolt Material:  Carpenter 158 Steel
    Barrel: 16.5” Medium Profile, Chrome Lined with A2 Flash Suppressor
    Barrel Material: 4150M Chrome Moly Vanadium 11595E Steel
    Rifling: 1 in 10” – Right Hand Twist – 6 Lands & Grooves
    Stock: 6 Position Telescoping Buttstock with Windham Weaponry Logo
    Forend:  Midwest Industries 15” SS Key Mod Free Float Handguard w. Rail Segment
    Pistol Grip: Hogue Beavertail Overmolded Grip
    Rear Sight:   None – Ready for optics or other type accessory sights
    Front Sight: None
    Weight / Length:  8.0 lbs. (without magazine) / 38” (34.1875” with Telestock collapsed)

    Packaging: Hard Plastic Gun Case with Black Web Sling, Operators Manual. Transferable Lifetime Warranty.

    The Quick Detach Points and Keymod

    The lower on this rifle comes with two QD sling attachment points located below the charging handle. The Midwest Industries Keymod handguard has 5 QD points located on the left and right hand sides of the handguard as well as one at the muzzle end of the handguard. This gives the user multiple points and configurations for their needed sling setup. I personally only like single point slings so this was right for that setup.

    This was the first time using the keymod rail system and overall I really like the design. It is simple and easy to install the rail pieces where you want and need them in a very short amount of time.

    2015-02-03 16.33.20

    The Trigger

    The trigger is built by Windham Weaponry. The say they take great pains to make the trigger as smooth and crisp as possible but if you are unhappy with their trigger they do offer other replacement triggers from companies like CMC, POF and Geissele.

    The trigger pull is a bit heavier than I like, but I never found myself jerking the trigger or having any other trigger related accuracy problems with the installed trigger.

    The Pistol Grip

    At first when I saw the Hogue overmolded grip I wasn’t sure how much I would like it. After getting some heavy range time in all kinds of temperatures, this is now my second favorite grip of all time. With gloves on, this grip wasn’t tacky but when I had sweaty hands in the heat it was.

    The Stock

    The stock is the standard 6 position stock with the Windham Weaponry logo. The stock is nothing to write home about. But I like the fact that using a stock like this helps keep the rifle at a very consumer friendly price. 

    The Barrel

    The 16.5 inch barrel is the perfect length for shooting from the bench, to run and gun, or stalk hunting.

    This length is my ideal length for a .308 semi auto rifle. It keeps the weight down so the rifle is more versatile.

    The Bolt Catch

    This was my only “problem” with the gun. When the bolt was locked to the rear just tapping the barrel against the rifle rest would send the bolt forward.

    The Charging Handle

    I have trained on the stock charging handles and all I have to say is real estate, real estate, real estate! I like my charging handles to have as much real estate as possible. The more grip I can get on the charging handle the better in my mind. If I have to rack the gun back, I want to go with as little effort as possible. The small stock charging handle is something I would change if I owned this rifle.

    2015-02-03 16.33.30

    Sights

    This rifle does not come with any sights.

    Shooting

    This gun looks like a tank and is built like one too. It can take a beating and still come back for seconds.

    In the 500+ rounds we shot through this gun, we never had a hiccup or anything. It just kept begging to be fed.

    We had this rifle on the 25 yard bay out to the 300 yard bay and I always kept 1-3 inch groupings. This is not necessarily an accurate portrayal of what the gun can produce but more of a mark on my shooting abilities.

    Cleaning

    This rifle is like any other AR style when it comes to cleaning. The 500+ rounds had very little carbon build up. The barrel stayed relatively clean. I would bet we could have shot another 1000+rounds  before it even started slowing down.

    Overall Thoughts

    For the price I have not seen a better .308 AR. Flat out, Windham Weaponry knows their sh*t. They know how to build quality rifles at a great consumer price point. They don’t focus on the bells and whistles because they know you are going to want your own bells which is where can see your savings. 

    Out of the box, the only thing you need to add is a sight. You can buy .308 rifles for the same price and you are going to end up wanting to replace the other companies “quality” parts. Windham Weaponry, from what I have shot and seen are not like that. You might find something you want to change, like the stock or the charging handle. But let’s face it, if you are working on a budget, the Windham Weaponry .308 line, as is, will impress you with their quality.

    The firearm industry is made up of a lot of really great people who are just trying to make the best and toughest products in the world. I have met the people at Windham Weaponry a few times at SHOT Show and was impressed by the great people. I believe that they are always trying to make something that is going to stand the test of time. .

    The Obligatory after SHOT Show List

    As you may have figured out or had read earlier this month we did not go to SHOT Show 2015 but we did watch as much coverage as we had time for.

    Our top 5 things we are excited for in 2015 is (in no order)

    Magpuls release of AK furniture  and the D60 AR style drum mag

    Magpul AK

    GetImage

     

    Geissele and their release of an ever needed AK trigger.

     

    The Leupold DEVO

    The Leatherman Tread

    GLOCK MOS

     

    I am very excited about the reviews planned for the GEARS Crew this year.

    We are working to bring more long range and pistols into the mix this year.  We want to really balance out all of our firearm reviews with more shooting gear reviews along side.

    For those of you who followed the coverage of the shot on other sites, what are some of the things you are looking forward to in 2015?