The Operators Suppressor Systems (O.S.S.)

“110 year old suppression technology does not perform for modern operators. The next generation in suppression is here.” – Operators Suppressor Systems

OSS Banner

OSS-Flow-Through-Suppressor-pictures-002

An Intro to Suppressors

Since we are on the topic of suppressors, let’s shed some light on the new suppressors in the market with a quick simple introduction.

The suppressors I am talking about is the patented Generation V Flow Through Technology, made by Operators Suppressor Systems located in Murray, Utah.

Introduced at ShotShow 2016

First introduced at ShotShow 2016, the Generation V Flow-Through Technology, is a patented state of the art suppressor.  I believe this will change how suppressors will be built for the years to come.

The Elite

Right now there are two types of OSS suppressors in the market. The first type is the Elite.  The Elite is built for a fully automatic rate of fire. The Elite can withstand six cycles of 8 thirty round magazines with 5.56 ammunition on full auto. This suppressor is forged to withstand the extremes of full-auto fire.

OSS BPR and OSS SRM

 The Helix

The next suppressor in the market is the Helix.  The Helix is designed and built for tactical, professional, hunting, and sport shooters demanding the best reduction. The “plug and play” also makes it convenient for you to fit on the barrel.

5.56-Helix-Carousel-Image-4-1-1200x600

Calibers

The available calibers in Elite, and Helix are;

5.56

7.62/30 Cal.

The .338, 50 Cal. and “Machine Gun” calibers are still being tested.  These calibers are scheduled to be released later this year.

The Helix and the Elite suppressor designs are both exclusively designed with the patented Generation V Flow-Through Technology and the rights are owned to Operators Suppressor Systems.

Stay tuned on how these suppressors work!

 

Save

Save

Vlogging, Range Day, and Meeting the New Crew

Range Day Vlog

Introducing J-Man and Matt to the GEARS Crew, getting 7.5 MPG while hauling guns to the range, EPIC Drone footage and so much more!

Guns used in the video

AR-15

AK-47

Glock 30SF

H&K 45 Tactical

Mossberg Flex 12 Gauge

Colt 1911-22

MP5SD-22

#WindhamProject RMCS-4

AR-15 Pistol

Remington R1 E 1911

Kel-Tec SU-16CA

 

Our YouTube Channel

The GEARS Crew is working hard to built a YouTube channel to bring you our latest reviews. It helps us out, oh so much, if you would click here to subscribe to our channel. Thank you.

Cleaning up the Ghost Problem at the Range with the CMMG .22lr Conversion Kit

conversion kit

The GEARS CREW are back at it again, saving the world from the evils of ectoplasm and the Ghosts who cause it.
CMMG was kind enough to send us out the conversion kit to test along side the #WindhamProject.  We wanted to bring the caliber count up from the stock 4 calibers of 5.56NATO,7.62x39mm,9mm and .300BLK to a fifth caliber with the .22lr conversion kit.

Gears of Guns

Versions of the Kit

CMMG makes a few versions of this kit to handle the left handed rifles.
Just swap this drop in conversion with your bolt carrier group and you will be ready to shoot .22LR.  Ships with 25rd 22LR magazine. All Stainless Steel Construction, includes a 25rd Magazine.
[from CMMGs website]

Training|Learning|Graduating

I think this is an awesome training aid. Trying to introduce people who have a fear of guns and mainly a fear of the AR platform can be at times difficult. This can be due to the noise or the simple fear of recoil hurting them.

I like being able to start someone off with a .22lr and getting them comfortable using one gun with one set of controls and then being able to graduate them to the .223/5.56 calibers.  In other words, you can train on the gun that you will graduate to.  This makes you comfortable with all the different parts of the gun that you will shoot long term. This is a great way to watch people get over their fear and really start to enjoy the sport.

#WindhamProject Update

What:

The Windham Project is the new Windham Weaponry RMCS-4 which is a Multi Caliber System built on the AR-15 platform and designed after the MGI Hydra. The rifle is chambered in

  1. 1. 5.56×45/.223Remington Standard AR Mag)
  2. 2. .300 AAC Blackout (Standard AR mag)
  3. 3. 7.62×39 (using an AK Mag)
  4. 4. 9mm (Using a Colt SMG Mag
  5. 5. .22LR (Using the CMMG .22 Conversion kit)

The idea behind our project is to build out an AR-15 using the Windham Weaponry RMCS-4 as the base and build out the parts to make this rifle more rounded out by using various parts from the industry.

Who:

Outside of Windham Weaponry supplying the rifle, we have a few companies who have already sent us a piece for the review.

  • · CAA – Flip up iron sights
  • · CMMG – .22 Conversion with two (25) round mags
  • · AXTS – Raptor Charging Handle, Talon Ambi Safety, and QD end plate
  • · Federal Ammunition – American Eagle 9mm and American Eagle subsonic .300AAC Blackout
  • · WMD Guns – *NEW* NiB BCG
  • · Hogue Overmolded Lava Red Pistol Grip and 6 position rifle stock

Future Plans:

We will be reviewing this rifle for 1 year. We will be reviewing each additional product sent to us, on their own in an individual review, as well as part of the final overall #WindhamProject review.

We are looking for parts that fall under the RMCS-4 parts that would be considered “stock parts” i.e. the stock, pistol grip, BCGs*, products of that nature.

End Goal:

We love the idea that Windham has for this rifle and we just want to have fun and see what else we can do with it. Our end all goals are to build an AR that is chambered in as many calibers as possible through either a barrel change or full upper receiver (in a case such as a .50BMG upper or a piston based upper or pistol caliber outside of 9mm)

Windham has built a platform that we believe is great for someone who may be limited on space and would like to own more than one rifle but space permitting is just not feasible. We want to expand on that idea. IMG_0050

IMG_0006

IMG_0002 (3)

IMG_0046 (2)

A Six Sided Review Of Hexmags

Introduction

If you haven’t heard about or seen Hexmag’s by now you are missing out. For those of us who shoot AR style rifles or platforms that use AR style mags, know we have a large market when it comes to magazines. With manufacturers such as Magpul, Lancer, Surefire and X Products, we have an option, not only in companies but also in style, capacity and material.

A Six Sided Review Of Hexmags

I had seen and used a few Hexmag’s prior to requesting a few for review from Hexmag. I am fond of polymer mags for the simple reason: there are never any failures to feed due to metal on metal friction when firing steel cased ammo.

Reliability

As I said, my personal most common Failure To Feed (FTF also failure to fire) is caused because I prefer to use steel cased ammo to do my reviews. My OOW Browning 1919 hates steel cased, ironically my SUREFIRE 60 round casket mag is about as good as a paperweight when loaded with steel cased and on hot days my C Products Defense mags will stick every 100 rounds or so. My only metal mag that does not care is my X Products X-15 Drum. Being in Texas, if I want a mag to function 99% of the time, I am left with no options but to mostly use polymer mags.

Hexmag is an all polymer body and follower with a steel spring.   This means for me, that I have a mag that doesn’t care what ammo it is feeding and just wants to keep running.

In my testing, I never had a single FTF, much less a single hiccup in the 3000+ rounds we have fired using these mags.

Grip Tape, Accessories and Design

Hexmag, as you can see, has a hexagonal pattern on the body of the mag. This goes in the opposite direction of most mags, that use the “waffle” design. Damn… now I am hungry for a Belgian waffle.

Belgian Waffle FS2000

HEXMAG ORANGE

As more people are now training and using “tactical” gear, I am noticing a trend of more companies offering better grips for everything from pistols to magazines. I haven’t gotten into this trend. I have reviewed a grip tape for my Glock 21 and as I said back then it just isn’t something I care about. I do know however that to a lot of people, it does matter. Hexmag has jumped on the bandwagon early and is just straight up offering the die cut (or whatever the proper term might be for precut) grip tape that matches the hexagonal shapes on their awesome mags.

You might be sitting there thinking, what kind of accessories might they offer? I mean Magpul offers their Magpul and ranger plates so what really could Hexmag offer that is even worth talking about?  Yup I am talking about multiple colors for the follower and base plate button release.

WHAT!?! GAME CHANGER! I mean who doesn’t want “Panther Pink” AR mag parts? I know I don’t!… Wait, I do like this idea… hold up. By having my mags color coded I can identify my match grade bench ammo and my M193 ammo without worrying about getting my mags mixed up? I’m in!

 

Shut-Up-And-Take-My-Money-1024x1280

The “HexID System” is pretty smart. You are not painting your magazines but you have an easy identifier to tell you what you are shooting. Some of us might not even think we would need or use this until we have them.

I shoot mostly steel case but I know on more than one occasion, I have been testing different ammo and needed to keep my loaded mags marked, so I know what I was working on. I also have experienced a few times where I have been running .300Blackout and 5.56x45mm guns on the same table using the same mag brands. We have to keep everything separated so we never cross mags in the guns.

HEXID SYSTEM

hex-id-mags

Testing

I want to tell you about all the amazing testing that we did. I drove over the magazine. That’s it. Oh and I shot 3000+ rounds using only 2 Hexmags over the course of 5 hours.

Yeah.

HEXMAG TRUCK TEST DAMAGE

Color options

HOLY BANANAS! They have 4 different colors to choose from and each color is more exciting than the last! They offer black, a tan-ish black, a lighter hue of black (some of ya’ll less “fashion forward” as I might call “dark gray”), and amazing tint of olive black that is so olive black you might even call it an olive drab.

hexmag_cover-670x446

Conclusion

Would I recommend Hexmag? Maybe. I don’t know… let me turn it back on you! Do you like interchangeable followers and base plate buttons to help you ID your mag from a mag pouch? What about mags that can withstand a Ford F250 loaded to bear with guns and gear driving over mags while on crushed rock that will stand up to the test and not bend or break? What about four different colors of black on AWESOME mags? I am not trying to sway your opinions of Hexmag. I just personally think there is one more 30 round polymer mag on that market that can stand next to someone like Magpul.

Seriously, 3000+ rounds over the course of 5 hours and I didn’t experience a single problem. We drove over one of the mags mid way through testing and still no hiccups.  Excuse me now, I am adding some Hexmags to my Christmas wish list.

Otis Technology Elite Cleaning System Review

I have this weird need to collect cleaning kits. It isn’t because I need 7 identical  12 gauge brushes or because I am lacking in the cleaning rod or cleaning cable department. It seems everyone has their own take on what a shooter needs to help them achieve the best clean possible and I like to see what the differences are. Most companies send out their version of oil and cleaner or even just CLP. However, so far, as much as I am willing to try new types of cleaners or CLPs I do favor my M-Pro7 32oz spray for cleaning.

 FG-1000_facing_left_Large_Multi-Large

Specs

– Over 40 firearm-specific cleaning components in a nylon case
– Six (6) Memory-Flex® Cables of varying length for effective and correct Breech-to-Muzzle® cleaning
– Twenty-two (22) bronze bore brushes to remove copper deposits and other fouling
– Obstruction removal tools for jammed cases and other blockages
– Specialized precision tools for complete breakdown and fine cleaning of all critical and hard to reach areas of your firearm
– Optics cleaning gear for care and maintenance of scopes, rangefinders and more
– Removable Tactical Cleaning System (Item # FG-750) for convenient carrying in the field
– Dimensions: 15 1/4″ x 8 3/4″ x 4 1/2″

The Brushes

As you can see in the picture above the main kit comes 14 different caliber brushes for just about every caliber you might need.

  1. 22 (.204 thru .222)
  2. 25 (.223 thru 6.5)
  3. 27 (.270 thru 7mm)
  4. 30 (.30 thru 8mm)
  5. 35 (.338 thru .357)
  6. 38 (.370 thru 9.3mm)
  7. 40 (.40 thru 10.75mm)
  8. 45 (.44 thru .458)
  9. 50 .50 thru 12.9mm)
  10. .410 GA Shotgun
  11. 28 GA Shotgun
  12. 20 GA Shotgun
  13. 16 GA Shotgun
  14. 12/10 GA Shotgun (
  15. .17 caliber short brush (rifle/pistol/air rifle)
  16. .22 caliber Short brush (rifle/pistol/air rifle)

The other six brushes are found in the removable tactical cleaning system

For me, this means I can clean all of my firearms and my friends and family can use this kit to clean theirs too.

Other brushes:  It comes with a nylon brush that I like to use in addition to gun cleaning as my travel tooth brush and beard comb. I have found that a hit of rem oil really gets the teeth pearly white and the beard soft and shiny (No!  Seriously,  I promise I am NOT stupid enough to believe that I can use gun cleaning gear to brush my teeth or comb my beard! Just joking! You will harm yourself if you try this).

The Other Nougaty Stuff and Things

Otis ships this kit with carbon scrapers, 3 tubes of CLP, lens cleaners, patches for all calibers, cleaning parts for air guns and even a chamber brush for your ARs.

This kit doesn’t come with a brass cleaning rod but rather cleaning cables.  I admit to having days I like them and days I don’t.

Removable Tactical Cleaning System

– 8″, 30″ and 34″ Memory-Flex® Cables for effective and correct Breech-to-Muzzle® cleaning
– Six (6) firearm-specific bronze bore brushes to remove copper deposits and other fouling
– Lightweight soft pack case with belt loop for convenient carrying
– T-handle and obstruction removal tools for jammed cases and other blockages
– Redesigned component holder secures and protects brushes and components
– Dimensions: 4″ x 4″ x 2 1/2″

The 6 brushes that come with this kit are 12/10 Gauge, .22 cal, .27 cal, .45, .38, and .30.

I think I would rather is be a MOLLE pouch but I am sure there is a good reason it isn’t. (I’ll ask at SHOT 2016)

Overall Thoughts 

The Otis Technology Elite Cleaning System retails for $99 Amazon. This kit is really nice in the brush department but I would have liked to have seen their AR BCM cleaning tool they call the B.O.N.E.® TOOL. They make them for both 5.56 and 7.62 bolts.

As I said earlier, I use this with M-Pro 7 cleaner and oil because I find it works best for me.

The Otis Technology Elite Cleaning System is great if you are looking for an all caliber in one kit. Everyone with more than one caliber collection should have one. This kits is a must for collectors, gun ranges, firearm instructors, etc.

If you are someone who stays in the 3 or 4 caliber range ( 9mm, .45, .22 and .30 caliber or what ever it might be) this kit might be overkill but if you know you are going to be branching out and getting into the revolver or big bore game or even just into the Shotgun game this kits is GREAT!

My only two comments, or wish list about what I would like to see changed or added is the BONE tool and the removable kit upgraded to MOLLE.

Nikon Monarch 3 6-24×50 SF Matte BDC Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

I had no clue Nikon made sport optics prior to going to my first SHOT Show. I only knew Nikon as the company who had made my last 3 digital cameras and outside of that I really didn’t know anything else.

The Nikon Monarch 3 6-24×50 SF Matte BDC

Nikon Monarch 3 6 24x50 Matte BDC Review

Specs

•       Magnification: 6-24x
Objective Diameter: 50mm
Exit Pupil: 2.1-8.3mm
Field of View: 4.2-16.8 ft @ 100 yds
Tube Diameter – Other: 1 in
Eye Relief: 4in
Objective Outside Diameter: 57.3mm
Eyepiece Outside Diameter: 44mm
Weight: 20.5 oz
Overall Length: 15.5 in
Adjustment Graduation – Other: 1/8 in
Max Internal Adjustment: 30 MOA
Parallax Setting – Other: 50 yds – ∞
Side Focus: Yes
Waterproof/Fogproof: Yes
Spot On Custom Turret: Yes
Parallax Adjustment: Yes
Matte Finish: Yes
Use: Centerfire Long Range
Reticle: BDC (Bullet Drop Compensator)
 
 
 

The Rifle and Scope Combo

I am not a distance shooter, but I enjoy the time spent practicing. With that said, I do not at this time, see a reason for me to spend $10,000 on a rifle and optics because I don’t shoot farther than 400 yards.
I just need a good bolt action and clear optic that will let me see 400 yards. I have mounted this Nikon Monarch 3 6-24×50 SF Matte BDC on my Mossberg ATR .308 which came with a inexpensive optic. The scope that came with the Mossberg was okay and worked out to 200 yards but it just was not a good scope for anything past that.
I wanted a scope to replace the old one and let me ring the gong at a distance.

In the Box

Nikon does not want to just give you the normal scope and paperwork. They want make sure you, the consumer, get what I like to call: the happy meal.
Open the box and be happy to see: Monarch 6-24×50 Side Focus Matte BDC, Nikon sunshade, Nikon low-profile adjustments with caps, target-style high profile knobs with caps and tapered easy grip knobs.
This means the scope comes with the inclusion of two additional sets of turrets.  One set is a high profile (tall) turret for target and tactical shooters, (it includes the appropriate size high profile turret caps). You also get a wider style turret, which gives the shooter more real estate to make quick adjustment (the wider turrets do not come with caps).

GearsofGuns Monarch3 review

(Scope not shown due to already being mounted to the rifle)

The Testing

While I had wanted to send this scope on an Elk hunt on the Wyoming/Colorado Border. We did not have the time to do this before writing the review.
We did not put this scope through any durability testing outside of the normal bouncing it gets inside the pelican case in the bed of the trucks on the dirt roads.
The scope stayed zeroed in every time we pulled it out of the case after driving to the range.

Bullet Drop Compensator Reticle (BDC)

  Nikon-bdc-reticle-Full

I like this reticle. Shooting a .308 bolt action using this scope made it easy to shoot at multiple targets at different ranges. 
 

The Turrets

If you have not spend much time behind a tube scope, the turrets on the scope are how you adjust for windage and elevation. The benefit to a scope with turrets is that it allows the shooter to zero the rifle to a distance (We will say 100 yards for the sake the explanation) and then reset the turrets MOA markings to the zero mark so you can always return your scope back to the distance you had it zeroed in for.

imgres

The turrets are not mushy. Each 1/8 inch click is positive and audible making for very noticeable adjustments.
Price
This scope is $699.95 on Nikons’ website, but you can find it online for around $660. The price might not be what a newer shooter would want to spend for their first rifle. For someone who knows how to shoot at longer distance and is looking for a quality scope this price isn’t going to break the bank.
 

Overall Thoughts

Nikon has pleasantly surprised me with a clear, easy to use and affordable scope.
I was very impressed with how clear the glass was. I would say that it is fairly close to the Leupold clarity I have in the multiple scopes I own of theirs.    
The scope has three different style turrets for different types of shooters which is a big bonus in my book.
The quality of the scope meet the expectation set by the price.
I cannot speak to shooting past 400 yards but to that distance I can say this scope was clear and crisp.

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Before I talk about this 1919A4 belt fed firearm I have to talk about Ohio Ordnance Works. I have never met them in person but I can tell you I have the upmost respect for the men and women of this company. Normally when working with a firearm manufacturer I work with one person and if I have any problems they are the only one I can contact to get a problem resolved. This company however is not like that. When I had a problem with the 1919 on a Tuesday morning I did not speak to my contact Bob Conroy I spoke with the owner directly. I will talk more about that a little later on and help further explain why I have to open with these comments.

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

M1919A4 Specs+

Designed: 1919
Number built: 5 million
Variants: A1; A2; A3; A4; A5; A6; M37 and AN/M2
Weight: 31 lb (14 kg) (M1919A4)
Length: 37.94 in (964 mm) (M1919A4)
Barrel length: 24 in (610 mm)
Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield and 7.62×51mm NATO
Action: Recoil-operated/short-recoil operation
Rate of fire: 400–600 round/min
Feed system: 250-round belt

The OOW M1919A4 is classified as a belt fed rifle.  The machine gun classification is for full auto only, making this gun a semi auto and available without a NFA tax stamp.

The Backstory

As many of you may have already seen and heard, Ohio Ordnance Works has redesigned the BAR and made it their H.C.A.R. (Heavy Counter Assault Rifle). This is a very cool looking rifle but it honestly was not the first thing that peaked my interest when I first came to their website. While scrolling through their guns I saw the semi auto 1919A4 Bundle which is a SEMI AUTO belt fed tripod rifle. Side note: this means you cannot put the sig stabilizing brace on this and turn it into a pistol (I found this out at my FFL holders shop when I told him all the cool kids were making pistols and I wanted one too). When I saw that, the first thing that went through my head was this is AWESOME! who doesn’t want to own a belt fed gun? and that is when I saw the price. $3,997. I honestly figured they would have this priced to be closer to $7000+.   On top of all of that, the gun at the bottom of the page is a 1919A4 with a Cleaning Kit, Manual, Headspace & Timing Gage, and the .308 Trunnion Shield for $2500.

YOU ARE TELLING ME I CAN OWN A BELT FED RIFLE FOR THE SAME PRICE AS 2.5 AR-15s? Sign me up!

Let me put two images in your head.

1. You pull up to the range, get out of your truck, walk to the firing line and pull out the same plain Jane AR-15 that every other shmuck has and shoot it

or

2. You pull up to your private range, back up into your bay, unload a 1919 A4 out of your truck and not give a s**t about what anyone else thinks because you own a belt fed tripod rifle of glory?

That is what I thought.

OOW 1919A4 Bundle Specs

Bundle Includes:

· 1919A4 Semi-Auto

· Manual

· Tripod, Pintle, T&E

· Headspace & Timing Gage

· Custom Cut Pelican Case

· 1919A4 Linker

· Cleaning Kit

· 1,000 Links

· Spade Grip

· .308 Trunion Shield

· Parts to Convert Gun to .30-06

· Membership Access to Video Tutorial

The Bundle

When my gunsmith got the M1919A4 in he told me he saw the parcel service driver spending more time than normal in the back of the truck so he walked outside to see what the deal was and the driver told him he needed to get his dolly to carry this box into the shop. My gun smith told him that he didn’t need to worry he would just help him carry it in. In his words, “that was a mistake”.

1919a4_bundle_copy

The pelican case isn’t grossly over heavy but it’s a long case that is meant to be carried using the handles or rolled using the built in wheels, making it easy to move. In the cardboard box it was heavy and awkward.

Inside of the custom cut Pelican case the rifle also comes with:
Manual
Tripod, Pintle, T&E
Headspace & Timing Gage
Cleaning Kit
Spade Grip
.308 Trunion Shield
and Parts to Convert the Gun to .30-06

You also get:

1000 Links (they link .308 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield and 8mm cartridges)
Membership Access to Video Tutorials (this is very important)
and the 1919A4 Linker

2015-06-02 19.06.24

The Ammo

Our good friends over at Luckygunner.com sponsored the .308 used in this review.
We used 1000 rounds of 308 Winchester 180 Gr Sp Prvi Partizan

Be sure to check them out for all your ammo needs.

Linking

When the rifle first came in Ohio Ordnance Works was out of stock of the linker so they shipped it without one. The crew and I had plans to get this gun on the range as quick as possible because it was going to rust from all the drooling if we didn’t.

IMG_5843
[1000 links in a plastic box I purchased)

I called over one of the guys to come help me hand load 500 rounds and I can tell you from experience this is a bloody ordeal and I am thankful I never have to do that with this gun ever again. It took two people about an hour of linking to get all the belts made (we made them into 40 round belts.)  When we got the linker in a few days later, it took me 23 minutes by myself to do the same amount.

IMG_5905

Shooting

As I said, we shot 1000+ rounds of .308 through the M1919A4. It was the most fun you can have without full auto.

IMG_5860

I tried both the spade grip as well as the standard grip and both of them are fun to shoot. I think I like the standard grip more because it means I don’t have to take the M1919A4 down to put it back in its case… maybe I am just lazy.

Changing Barrels and Cleaning

This gun comes with a membership to videos on how to change the barrel and take apart the gun and they do a much better job at explaining this than I can. I will say I have watched the videos every time I have cleaned this gun and when I had to fix the gun to insure I don’t miss anything. The videos are helpful and comprehensive.

The Problem and the Solution

On the first range trip, we shot about 250 rounds before I broke the gun. Yes I admit I broke it and I am kind of happy it happened. I have no idea why the detent pin bent but the pin that rides in the channel from the extraction arm bent out of place and stopped the gun from working. Ohio Ordnance Works said, “it was probably a fluke, a wriggling out of place by the pin. We’ve made tons of these and not had an issue like that. They are new/grad A surplus, so you may have found one that just wasn’t perfect.”

IMG_5861

I am happy about breaking the gun because of the experience I had afterwards. I hate breaking guns. I know as a reviewer I can be hard on gun but normally we know their limits and where the maximum amount of safe operating abuse is and we err on the side of caution. This however was not abuse. We were still warming the M1919A4 up when it bent.

This killed the mood at the range. Since this is a review gun and it was a weekday morning I called Ohio Ordnance Works to try and figure out what had happened. I spoke with the young lady who answered the phone and she told me, Bob Conroy wasn’t in the office.  She transferred me to Mr. Landies instead. Under stress, my vocabulary resorts to almost grunting so when Mr. Landies got on the phone and started helping me he was very understanding at my lost of proper terminology and told me that a picture is worth 1000 words or in my case 3 words and a grunt. So I e-mailed a photo of the bent part and he e-mailed me back just a few minutes later asking for a shipping address.

The following day I had my whole family over for lunch. When I got a knock at my door from the shipper with the part, you might say I was very surprised. I had figured I wouldn’t get this gun fixed for a few days at a minimum, but they overnighted the part to me. This blew me away, no one does that. No one ships you the part overnight unless it is a dire emergency. To say the least, I was impressed.

About a month ago, while on Instagram, I saw that Ohio Ordnance Works had posted a picture of a gentleman holding a beautiful rifle with the caption of Happy birthday boss… Mr. Landies. As it turns out I wasn’t transferred to some shop floor guy who builds the rifles but to the owner of the company. Again… no one does that.

After fixing the gun we took it back on the range a few weeks later and the gun ran like a champ. Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 6.28.23 PM

Final Thoughts

The gun is battle tested. I never had any doubts that this was a good gun, if it wasn’t, it would not still be in service all over the world.
While owning this 1919A4 only makes me feel cooler in my head, I know that I will not be taking this out to the range every Sunday. I know that it is a special occasion gun than is very expensive to just play with.

This is a gun that has a lot of history attached to it and since Ohio Ordnance Works has made this M1919A4 to be as affordable to own as possible I think it is a very nice piece to have in anyone’s collection. Plus, when your friends are bragging that they own a Tavor or a SCAR 17 you can just look at them and say “that’s cute, I own a belt fed tripod rifle”.

I have been very impressed with this company from the first time I spoke with them on the phone. They have always been very helpful and ready to work with us. I know I say this a lot, but I truly love the gun community. There is, bar none, not a single community with more caring and awesome people.

Mecharmor Defense Systems TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review

As I discussed in the review of my Windham .308 AR, I am someone who likes to be able to get as much meat on a charging handle as possible. I want to be able to grip and rip when I am running my rifle and the milspec charging handle is just too small in my opinion. When I have to pull back a .308 bolt carrier group, I want to be able to do that without losing grip.

The old saying of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” came to mind a lot during my research phase of changing the charging handle on Windham .308 AR. My AR-15 (AWS ZA-15) came with a Mecharmor TacOps-1 charging handle.  I fell in love with it the first time I racked the bolt back. I have used the Mecharmor charging handle in my training and I have committed the feel to memory. As I said, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. It was obvious that I wanted to get the same charging handle for the Windham .308 AR as I have on my AWS ZA-15.

Gears Of Guns | Mecharmor TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review
(Left to Right: Mecharmor TacOps-1 .308, Milspec Windham .308, Mecharmor TacOps-1 5.56)

There is no doubt that the Mecharmor TacOps-1 charging handle beats the Milspec handle by a mile when it comes to size.

Gears Of Guns | Mecharmor TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review

You can see even with one hand I have a lot of real estate to grip the charging handle and pull back on the bolt

Gears Of Guns | Mecharmor TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review

Having the Leupold scope mounted where it is normally, you would have to use two fingers to rack the bolt with the milspec.

Gears Of Guns | Mecharmor TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review

Gears Of Guns | Mecharmor TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review

Gears Of Guns | Mecharmor TacOps-1 Charging Handle Review

The Mecharmor TacOps-1 is an ambi charging handle.

If you like the compact size that a milspec charging handle has to offer then the  Mecharmor TacOpst might not be for you.  It could create more snag points for when you are using the sling, but I have never had a problem with snagging, so that is just a theory.

Both of the Mecharmor TacOps-1, the .308 and the 5.56  are just under $70  which is on par with most ambi charging handles.

I am interested in doing some comparison testing with other brands of charging handles which might be something I will try to work on this year. Keep watching for any follow up.

Editorial: Standardizing vs. Proprietary

A few weeks back I reviewed a Windham Weaponry .308 AR style rifle. When I finished the review I contacted my local gunsmith as well as Windham and asked if they knew of any standardization in the .308 AR market.  I wanted to know if anyone had made a pattern for the upper and lower as well as the Bolt Carrier Group (BCG).

standard vs proprietary

The question seemed straight forward, however the answer isn’t. Long story short, no. No one has made a standard to which everyone is following.

(Note: I am using the 5.56×45 and the .223 Remington interchangeably in the article even though they are not the same cartridge.  AR stands for Armalite Rifle not Assault Rifle).

History

In 1955 and 1956 Armalite designed the first prototypes of the original AR-10 chambered in the 7.62×51 (.308 Winchester.)  By 1957, the first AR-15 using the intermediate cartridge 5.56×45 NATO was designed and then sold to Colt due to financial problems that Armalite was having.

Is Anything New Anymore?

Since the AR-10 was designed before the AR-15 it would seem we haven’t taken a step forward but a step back in time. Thanks to Government bans, such as the 1994 Assault Weapon Ban that ended in 2004 and other set backs, the modern sporting rifle world has been trying to play catch up for the past 11 years.

Intermediate vs. Rifle Cartridges

I have never really been a fan of the .223 Remington (5.56x45NATO) and I know I am not alone in this distaste. I have always liked the 7.62x39mm or the newer .300 AAC Blackout when it comes to intermediate cartridges. The .308 win is a rifle cartridge that fits more than just the distance shooting bill. The fact of the matter is that the .308 and the 5.56 have been on the battle field for almost the same amount of time and yet we chose the less ballistically versatile round for civilian and military applications.

DPMS/SR-25 Magazines vs. Proprietary

When building a new firearm platform you have to consider the way your firearm is going to hold rounds. In the the bolt action world we typically use an in-stock style magazine, for the lever actions and shotguns we use a tube and elevator (shell carrier) system, for the semi and full autos we have a choice. Belt fed (seen mainly in past in full auto only but is making it way back in semi auto versions of full auto machine guns) or magazine fed.

The .308 ARs are all based on the smaller AR-15, so you would think after seeing the success of the AR-15 magazine market it would be smarter to stick with what works. But we are still in a relearning stage in the firearm world about supply and demand. The FN SCAR 17 uses a proprietary .308 mag but the SCAR 16 uses STANAG (AR-15 style magazines). When FN released the SCAR 17 to the general population they had problems keeping magazines in stock because they were trying to keep the military contracts filled and just they couldn’t keep up with demand. That’s a problem with proprietary.

The DPMS/SR-25 style magazines are now being made by a number of different magazine manufacturers which means I can order as many as I want.

Standardizing

The AR-15 is known as the Legos for adults. Everything is changeable. If I want a nickel boron BCG I can find a company I like and replace mine in my AR-15.  If I want a new charging handle I get one. If I want to put a .50BMG bolt action upper on my lower I can. This seems to me like a great idea. However in the .308 AR world we have yet to reach an agreement as to what the specs should be.

Final thoughts

Until they all come to an agreement about standardizing, the consumer market for the .308 AR is left with fewer options.  To me, more options means more money back in the pockets of the firearm manufacturers.  More money to the manufacturers means more money can be spent on R&D, which means more advanced guns in the future.

Name this Gun 11-26: Robinson Armament XCR-M

url

Specs

Calibers: .308, .243, .260
Overall Length: 37″ (18.6″ barrel) Collapsed
Folded Length: 30″ (18.6″ barrel)
Weight Empty:9.25lbs (heavy contour barrel)
Barrel Lengths: 16″, 18.6″, 20″
Top Rail Length: 20″
Side and Bottom Rails:9.4″

Daniel Watters Correctly named this rifle.

 

I am someone who prefers the larger cartridges like the .308win. It is interesting to me to see a semi auto chambered in the .243win as it isn’t as common to see. The GEARS Crew has a bolt action .243 that we have used from time to time in testing. The design is reminiscent of the Scar and the ACR rifles. The rifle does use SR-25 style mags vs. the expensive AR-10 style, that also means it uses the .308 P-mags from Magpul.  This rifle has a left side charging handle. The rifle uses a long stroke gas piston.

What are your thoughts on this rifle?

The Pedersen Device–1903 Springfield

I typically don’t do articles about historical firearms because my knowledge on most of the subjects would not make for good info. I saw this video and since our family owns a 1903 it is something that is close to my heart. My father was given our 1903 rifle by my late grandfather.

The 1903 is an old sporterized Rock Island Armory 1903 A3 that has been used a deer rifle for years. I love the rifle as it is very accurate and just a great .30-06 rifle.

B57-03-33_thumb.jpg

This image found on the http://www.nramuseum.org. shows the similarity to a the modern AR-15 5.56 to .22lr conversion kits in how the bolt has a “shell” to extend into the barrel giving the converted caliber a new chamber.

The cartridge used was a .30-18 auto.