Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Before I talk about this 1919A4 belt fed firearm I have to talk about Ohio Ordnance Works. I have never met them in person but I can tell you I have the upmost respect for the men and women of this company. Normally when working with a firearm manufacturer I work with one person and if I have any problems they are the only one I can contact to get a problem resolved. This company however is not like that. When I had a problem with the 1919 on a Tuesday morning I did not speak to my contact Bob Conroy I spoke with the owner directly. I will talk more about that a little later on and help further explain why I have to open with these comments.

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

M1919A4 Specs+

Designed: 1919
Number built: 5 million
Variants: A1; A2; A3; A4; A5; A6; M37 and AN/M2
Weight: 31 lb (14 kg) (M1919A4)
Length: 37.94 in (964 mm) (M1919A4)
Barrel length: 24 in (610 mm)
Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield and 7.62×51mm NATO
Action: Recoil-operated/short-recoil operation
Rate of fire: 400–600 round/min
Feed system: 250-round belt

The OOW M1919A4 is classified as a belt fed rifle.  The machine gun classification is for full auto only, making this gun a semi auto and available without a NFA tax stamp.

The Backstory

As many of you may have already seen and heard, Ohio Ordnance Works has redesigned the BAR and made it their H.C.A.R. (Heavy Counter Assault Rifle). This is a very cool looking rifle but it honestly was not the first thing that peaked my interest when I first came to their website. While scrolling through their guns I saw the semi auto 1919A4 Bundle which is a SEMI AUTO belt fed tripod rifle. Side note: this means you cannot put the sig stabilizing brace on this and turn it into a pistol (I found this out at my FFL holders shop when I told him all the cool kids were making pistols and I wanted one too). When I saw that, the first thing that went through my head was this is AWESOME! who doesn’t want to own a belt fed gun? and that is when I saw the price. $3,997. I honestly figured they would have this priced to be closer to $7000+.   On top of all of that, the gun at the bottom of the page is a 1919A4 with a Cleaning Kit, Manual, Headspace & Timing Gage, and the .308 Trunnion Shield for $2500.

YOU ARE TELLING ME I CAN OWN A BELT FED RIFLE FOR THE SAME PRICE AS 2.5 AR-15s? Sign me up!

Let me put two images in your head.

1. You pull up to the range, get out of your truck, walk to the firing line and pull out the same plain Jane AR-15 that every other shmuck has and shoot it

or

2. You pull up to your private range, back up into your bay, unload a 1919 A4 out of your truck and not give a s**t about what anyone else thinks because you own a belt fed tripod rifle of glory?

That is what I thought.

OOW 1919A4 Bundle Specs

Bundle Includes:

· 1919A4 Semi-Auto

· Manual

· Tripod, Pintle, T&E

· Headspace & Timing Gage

· Custom Cut Pelican Case

· 1919A4 Linker

· Cleaning Kit

· 1,000 Links

· Spade Grip

· .308 Trunion Shield

· Parts to Convert Gun to .30-06

· Membership Access to Video Tutorial

The Bundle

When my gunsmith got the M1919A4 in he told me he saw the parcel service driver spending more time than normal in the back of the truck so he walked outside to see what the deal was and the driver told him he needed to get his dolly to carry this box into the shop. My gun smith told him that he didn’t need to worry he would just help him carry it in. In his words, “that was a mistake”.

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The pelican case isn’t grossly over heavy but it’s a long case that is meant to be carried using the handles or rolled using the built in wheels, making it easy to move. In the cardboard box it was heavy and awkward.

Inside of the custom cut Pelican case the rifle also comes with:
Manual
Tripod, Pintle, T&E
Headspace & Timing Gage
Cleaning Kit
Spade Grip
.308 Trunion Shield
and Parts to Convert the Gun to .30-06

You also get:

1000 Links (they link .308 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield and 8mm cartridges)
Membership Access to Video Tutorials (this is very important)
and the 1919A4 Linker

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The Ammo

Our good friends over at Luckygunner.com sponsored the .308 used in this review.
We used 1000 rounds of 308 Winchester 180 Gr Sp Prvi Partizan

Be sure to check them out for all your ammo needs.

Linking

When the rifle first came in Ohio Ordnance Works was out of stock of the linker so they shipped it without one. The crew and I had plans to get this gun on the range as quick as possible because it was going to rust from all the drooling if we didn’t.

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[1000 links in a plastic box I purchased)

I called over one of the guys to come help me hand load 500 rounds and I can tell you from experience this is a bloody ordeal and I am thankful I never have to do that with this gun ever again. It took two people about an hour of linking to get all the belts made (we made them into 40 round belts.)  When we got the linker in a few days later, it took me 23 minutes by myself to do the same amount.

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Shooting

As I said, we shot 1000+ rounds of .308 through the M1919A4. It was the most fun you can have without full auto.

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I tried both the spade grip as well as the standard grip and both of them are fun to shoot. I think I like the standard grip more because it means I don’t have to take the M1919A4 down to put it back in its case… maybe I am just lazy.

Changing Barrels and Cleaning

This gun comes with a membership to videos on how to change the barrel and take apart the gun and they do a much better job at explaining this than I can. I will say I have watched the videos every time I have cleaned this gun and when I had to fix the gun to insure I don’t miss anything. The videos are helpful and comprehensive.

The Problem and the Solution

On the first range trip, we shot about 250 rounds before I broke the gun. Yes I admit I broke it and I am kind of happy it happened. I have no idea why the detent pin bent but the pin that rides in the channel from the extraction arm bent out of place and stopped the gun from working. Ohio Ordnance Works said, “it was probably a fluke, a wriggling out of place by the pin. We’ve made tons of these and not had an issue like that. They are new/grad A surplus, so you may have found one that just wasn’t perfect.”

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I am happy about breaking the gun because of the experience I had afterwards. I hate breaking guns. I know as a reviewer I can be hard on gun but normally we know their limits and where the maximum amount of safe operating abuse is and we err on the side of caution. This however was not abuse. We were still warming the M1919A4 up when it bent.

This killed the mood at the range. Since this is a review gun and it was a weekday morning I called Ohio Ordnance Works to try and figure out what had happened. I spoke with the young lady who answered the phone and she told me, Bob Conroy wasn’t in the office.  She transferred me to Mr. Landies instead. Under stress, my vocabulary resorts to almost grunting so when Mr. Landies got on the phone and started helping me he was very understanding at my lost of proper terminology and told me that a picture is worth 1000 words or in my case 3 words and a grunt. So I e-mailed a photo of the bent part and he e-mailed me back just a few minutes later asking for a shipping address.

The following day I had my whole family over for lunch. When I got a knock at my door from the shipper with the part, you might say I was very surprised. I had figured I wouldn’t get this gun fixed for a few days at a minimum, but they overnighted the part to me. This blew me away, no one does that. No one ships you the part overnight unless it is a dire emergency. To say the least, I was impressed.

About a month ago, while on Instagram, I saw that Ohio Ordnance Works had posted a picture of a gentleman holding a beautiful rifle with the caption of Happy birthday boss… Mr. Landies. As it turns out I wasn’t transferred to some shop floor guy who builds the rifles but to the owner of the company. Again… no one does that.

After fixing the gun we took it back on the range a few weeks later and the gun ran like a champ. Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 6.28.23 PM

Final Thoughts

The gun is battle tested. I never had any doubts that this was a good gun, if it wasn’t, it would not still be in service all over the world.
While owning this 1919A4 only makes me feel cooler in my head, I know that I will not be taking this out to the range every Sunday. I know that it is a special occasion gun than is very expensive to just play with.

This is a gun that has a lot of history attached to it and since Ohio Ordnance Works has made this M1919A4 to be as affordable to own as possible I think it is a very nice piece to have in anyone’s collection. Plus, when your friends are bragging that they own a Tavor or a SCAR 17 you can just look at them and say “that’s cute, I own a belt fed tripod rifle”.

I have been very impressed with this company from the first time I spoke with them on the phone. They have always been very helpful and ready to work with us. I know I say this a lot, but I truly love the gun community. There is, bar none, not a single community with more caring and awesome people.

Editorial: Standardizing vs. Proprietary

A few weeks back I reviewed a Windham Weaponry .308 AR style rifle. When I finished the review I contacted my local gunsmith as well as Windham and asked if they knew of any standardization in the .308 AR market.  I wanted to know if anyone had made a pattern for the upper and lower as well as the Bolt Carrier Group (BCG).

standard vs proprietary

The question seemed straight forward, however the answer isn’t. Long story short, no. No one has made a standard to which everyone is following.

(Note: I am using the 5.56×45 and the .223 Remington interchangeably in the article even though they are not the same cartridge.  AR stands for Armalite Rifle not Assault Rifle).

History

In 1955 and 1956 Armalite designed the first prototypes of the original AR-10 chambered in the 7.62×51 (.308 Winchester.)  By 1957, the first AR-15 using the intermediate cartridge 5.56×45 NATO was designed and then sold to Colt due to financial problems that Armalite was having.

Is Anything New Anymore?

Since the AR-10 was designed before the AR-15 it would seem we haven’t taken a step forward but a step back in time. Thanks to Government bans, such as the 1994 Assault Weapon Ban that ended in 2004 and other set backs, the modern sporting rifle world has been trying to play catch up for the past 11 years.

Intermediate vs. Rifle Cartridges

I have never really been a fan of the .223 Remington (5.56x45NATO) and I know I am not alone in this distaste. I have always liked the 7.62x39mm or the newer .300 AAC Blackout when it comes to intermediate cartridges. The .308 win is a rifle cartridge that fits more than just the distance shooting bill. The fact of the matter is that the .308 and the 5.56 have been on the battle field for almost the same amount of time and yet we chose the less ballistically versatile round for civilian and military applications.

DPMS/SR-25 Magazines vs. Proprietary

When building a new firearm platform you have to consider the way your firearm is going to hold rounds. In the the bolt action world we typically use an in-stock style magazine, for the lever actions and shotguns we use a tube and elevator (shell carrier) system, for the semi and full autos we have a choice. Belt fed (seen mainly in past in full auto only but is making it way back in semi auto versions of full auto machine guns) or magazine fed.

The .308 ARs are all based on the smaller AR-15, so you would think after seeing the success of the AR-15 magazine market it would be smarter to stick with what works. But we are still in a relearning stage in the firearm world about supply and demand. The FN SCAR 17 uses a proprietary .308 mag but the SCAR 16 uses STANAG (AR-15 style magazines). When FN released the SCAR 17 to the general population they had problems keeping magazines in stock because they were trying to keep the military contracts filled and just they couldn’t keep up with demand. That’s a problem with proprietary.

The DPMS/SR-25 style magazines are now being made by a number of different magazine manufacturers which means I can order as many as I want.

Standardizing

The AR-15 is known as the Legos for adults. Everything is changeable. If I want a nickel boron BCG I can find a company I like and replace mine in my AR-15.  If I want a new charging handle I get one. If I want to put a .50BMG bolt action upper on my lower I can. This seems to me like a great idea. However in the .308 AR world we have yet to reach an agreement as to what the specs should be.

Final thoughts

Until they all come to an agreement about standardizing, the consumer market for the .308 AR is left with fewer options.  To me, more options means more money back in the pockets of the firearm manufacturers.  More money to the manufacturers means more money can be spent on R&D, which means more advanced guns in the future.

Winchester back at it with the 1911 .45acp

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Phil over at Thefirearmblog.com  showing off the new wooden box of Winchester “1911 .45 ACP”.

I published the Press release about the new line of Winchester ammo a few months back. I think Winchester is doing well by branding it with the WIN 1911.  I still hear from people less familiar with firearms, telling me they need to go buy 1911 rounds or AR rounds like somehow that means something with so many variants chambered in different calibers. Yes, there are plenty of reasons to assume that the firearm in question is its standard caliber, but I met a gentlemen out at the range one day who was very new to firearms and was very excited to shoot his new 1911 and when he went to load the rounds the bullets were too big, He had purchased a 9mm 1911 and when we went into the store he asked for 1911 ammo and was sold 5 boxes of .45acp.

Phil talks about it being a nice Christmas gift and I can see that, however at $140 for the kit I don’t see that the wooden box is worth $60 (based on a $20 50 round  box of .45acp). I like the box and it would be nice to look at, but the ammo inside is overly pricy for my taste.

If you would like to see more pictures check out Thefirearmblog.com

VIDEO TUESDAY!!! TAOFLEDERMAUS Experimental Shotgun Rounds

 

TAOFLEDERMAUS back at it working with his experimental 12G shotgun shells. I do not advocate that ANYONE mimics or tries what he does with testing these experimental rounds but I do think it is an interesting thing to watch. Something I would personally love to see is the inside of that Mossberg barrel. He has shot some rather strange items through it and I am curious how it has stood up to that.

On average, how many rounds do you PERSONALLY shoot on a normal range day?

Reblog from TheFirearmblog: Ammo Subscription Service

ammo-ready

“A new service promises to deliver uninterrupted, regular supplies of ammunition to subscribers starting in July 2014.  The new service, AmmoReady.com, will initially offer ammo subscriptions for popular handgun calibers”. – See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com

I think this is a rather interesting idea. I know personally, if the price is right, this could be something the GEARs Crew would look at later down the road.  I don’t enjoy having to hunting out the best price for the ammo, I want and need, when I want it.

If they can find a way to keep the prices competitive I am sure a lot of people will be looking into joining this kind of program.

On the flip side of that coin,  because of the hunting season, the newest and latest toys on the market and even the weather, my ammo needs change on a regular basis.

Press Release: LEHIGH DEFENSE ANNOUNCES CONTROLLED CHAOS AMMUNITION & PROJECTILES

We are pleased to announce that we are releasing two new products for 2014.

LehighDefenseControlledChaos

The first is our Controlled Chaos Ammunition and Projectiles. The second is our line of Controlled Fracturing Bullets.

Our Controlled Chaos Technology

Our Controlled Chaos bullet is designed to penetrate to a specific depth and then fracture. This fracturing is initiated when the internal hydraulic pressure exceeds the hoop strength of the nose design.

At the time of fracture, a massive energy spike is released as the particles break away and radiate outward from the initial trajectory path.

This energy spike and the resulting temporary cavity send a shock wave through the animal’s circulatory and nervous systems, immediately shutting down the functioning of these systems.

LehighDefenseControlledFracturing

Our Controlled Fracturing Technology (The originator of CF Technology)

Our Controlled Fracturing bullet is designed to deliver maximum terminal performance. This is made possible by pre-stressing the solid copper or solid brass bullets at specific points so that, after a predetermined penetration depth, the razor-edge petals deploy, releasing an energy spike, separating and radiating outward from the primary path of the bullet.

The bullet shank, now back to bore diameter, continues penetrating straight and deep along the initial impact path.

ABOUT LEHIGH DEFENSE

Lehigh Defense is driven by a desire to transform. Throughout our 20+ year history, we’ve designed, tested, redesigned and perfected many new firearm and ammunition technologies, all in the name of advancing the industry. As our reputation has grown, Lehigh has continued to investigate and improve upon our most revolutionary ammunition. Building on the predictability of our Controlled Fracture technology, we now produce personal defense ammunition with exceptional terminal and barrier performance. As a result, this revolutionary projectile has earned a reputation for outstanding bystander safety with law enforcement officials and military personnel. Visit: www.lehighdefense.com

Lehigh-Defense-Logo (1)

Colt LE901 Modular Multi-Caliber Rifle Review

I have been wanting to get my hands on the LE901 since Colt first debuted it at SHOT Show 2012. After 2 years of waiting, I finally got the chance to shoot this AWESOME rifle.

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In the caliber war debates, I have always stood with the .308 WIN as my favorite AR caliber. There is something about sending 150 grains of lead down range without killing your shoulder that always makes me happy.

Colt LE901 specs

I had this rifle for 3 months and we shot roughly 500 rounds down range without one problem. I asked Colt to send the mag well adapter, 5.56 spring and buffer and a LE6940 5.56 upper with the LE901. I shot mostly Liberty Silverado .223 ammo using the Colt LE6940 and found that the combo worked well at keeping the barrel clean.

Thoughts about the multi-caliber system

I hate spending money twice on the same part for two guns like a trigger or butt stock. I know what I like, so typically I am going to replace the parts that don’t feel right, with ones that do. This rifle makes that problem go away. You only have to own one lower, one trigger group, one pistol grip and one buttstock that is your personal preference.  Then you have different uppers for the different needs. This way you can have a .308 win for the bench and a .223 for run and gun.

 

 

Caliber change

To change the gun just takes just a few seconds. All you need to change is the buffer and spring. Have your mag well adapter block on the 5.56 upper and that just drops in the mag well and using the same pins for the .308 win upper.  This is quick and easy to do on the fly, making this gun a breeze to use in either caliber.

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Other Calibers

Since the .300 blackout was designed for the .223 AR platform you could also use it for this rifle.

The LE901’s .308 upper is propriety and only used on this rifle. This means you don’t have the option yet, to change to the other heavy calibers like other AR-10 style rifles, namely .243 win.

When that day comes, this rifle truly will start exceeding anything else in its class. The AR-15 already has so many different uppers from .22 conversions to .50BMG bolt action to crossbows. The introduction into the .308 mag well calibers truly unlocks it full potential.

Shooting from the bench

This rifle has the stock Colt trigger which I really have never been a fan of, but it still does a good job of not being sloppy and hard breaking.

On the bench at 300 yards I was shooting a 2 inch group which is more a comment on my lack of distance skills than the rifle itself.

Run and Gun

We took this gun and set up a few shooting courses at the range for fun and found we like the heavier .308 more for the course than we did with the lighter hitting 5.56. We kept forgetting the .308 Magpul P-mag Colt shipped with the rifle, was 20 rounds and that our 5.56 P-mag is 30.  We would run the course like we had 30 rounds vs. the 20 we really had loaded.

Cleaning

This rifle is like any other AR style when it comes to cleaning.

Ambidextrous controls

Since I am right handed, I mostly used the bolt release on the right hand side of the rifle which was nice. However, I would have also liked the ability to lock the bolt on the same side.

Owning this rifle

I do plan to buy one of these rifles someday, for the simple fact that it is one lower for multiple uppers.

Overall thoughts

I loved this rifle and I do plan on trying to get another one for review and maybe purchase in the future.

As a stock Colt rifle this is built to be used and abused and takes it. The Colt tradition of making great firearms is very much alive and well in this rifle.

PRODUCT RECALL OF WINCHESTER 22 LONG RIFLE RIMFIRE AMMUNITION

Olin Corporation, through its Winchester Division, is recalling two (2) lots of M*22™ 22 Long Rifle 40 Grain Black Copper Plated Round Nose rimfire ammunition.

Symbol Number: S22LRT

Lot Numbers: GD42L and GD52L

Winchester has determined the above lots of 22 Long Rifle rimfire ammunition may contain double powder charges. Ammunition with double powder charges may subject the shooter or bystanders to a risk of serious personal injury and/or death, or cause firearm damage, rendering the firearm inoperable.

DO NOT USE WINCHESTER® M*22™ 22 Long Rifle RIMFIRE AMMUNITION WITH LOT NUMBERS GD42L or GD52L. The ammunition Lot Number is imprinted (stamped without ink) on the left tuck flap of the 500-round carton as indicated here. The 1000-round intermediate carton does not have a Lot Number.

To determine if your ammunition is subject to this notice, review the Symbol Number and Lot Number. If it is Symbol Number S22LRT with a Lot Number containing GD42L or GD52L immediately discontinue use and contact Winchester toll-free at 866-423-5224 or visit http://www.winchester.com/Product-Service/Pages/Contact-Us.aspx for free UPS pick-up of the recalled ammunition.

This notice applies only to Symbol Number S22LRT with Lot Numbers GD42L and GD52L. Other Symbol Numbers or Lot Numbers are not subject to this recall.

If you have any questions concerning this 22 Long Rifle rimfire ammunition recall please call toll-free 866-423-5224, write to Winchester (600 Powder Mill Road, East Alton, IL 62024 Attn: S22LRT Recall), or contact Winchester Customer Support online.

We apologize for this inconvenience.

WINCHESTER

Ammo cans and desiccants

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When you get into shooting one of the things you have to think about is ammo storage and ammo transport. Before I started shooting more than once or twice a year on my own I would just head to the store buy the ammo I wanted to shoot and keep it in the store bag until I got to the range.

LEFTOVER LOOSE AMMO

If I didn’t shoot up all my ammo, the leftover loose ammo would just get thrown in my range bag and I’d be on my merry way.  Now that I shoot more, I have bulk ammo that I buy months before a range day and keep it locked up in storage until I need it.

I have seen people use everything from plastic bags to cardboard boxes to ammo cans to 10 gallon Rubbermaid containers filled with loose .223 as storage.   But in my opinion, one of the best and most common loose ammo containers is the ammo can.

ARMY SURPLUS STORES

Army surplus stores use to sell them on the cheap for under $5 for a .50 BMG can. Not to depress anyone reading this but 10 years ago when wolf ammo was $45 for 500 rounds of 7.62x39mm they even sold them to you in .30 caliber ammo cans.

Now we are seeing them for about $10-$20 per can for metal or plastic cans.

mtm

PROS AND CONS

There are two types of cans.  The metal “Army Surplus” cans and the plastic ammo storage cans. Both have their place but they also have their own downfalls. When I started Gearsofguns.com I was using the plastic cans which worked fine for a few months but the weight would get to them and break the handles. I switched over to the metal cans which are clearly harder to “break”. I like the plastics for the simple reason that they can’t rust or corrode and destroy the ammo. So, as I said each have their pros and cons.

MOISTURE CONTROL

If you are looking at ammo storage and thinking about ammo cans something you need of be mindful of is moisture. I have parents who take vitamins and most of the vitamins come with little desiccant packs.  I have asked them to save them for me.  I just fill my ammo cans with about 1 or 2 boxes of ammo and throw in one or two desiccant packs between the layers of ammo to keep my ammo dry and fresh.

If you are more of the hobby type you can go to your local hobby store and pick up silica gel beads used for drying flowers.  Fill coffee filters with the silica gel with just enough to be able to close and staple the filler shut.  Just keep one on top of your ammo under the sealed lid.


Written for Ammoforsale.com – Which caliber is best?

For the full Ammoforsale.com article click here

(Atticus James) I was asked which caliber I think is best out of the 9mm, .40 S&W and the .45 ACP.

This is not an easy question for me to just flat out say one is better than the other as I own and love all three calibers. Sure the 9mm is cheap to shoot and has low felt recoil so it is fun for most all shooters. The .45 acp has that manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feel. The .40 S&W is a middle of the road round as it was designed to have as much of the best of both the 9mm and the .45 acp.

Before I get to what I feel is the best of the three calibers I would like to give my view points on all three

.45 ACP Review

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The first caliber of the three I ever owned was a Glock 21 chambered in the .45 acp and I have shot so many rounds of .45 acp  that I am very comfortable with the weight and felt recoil.

When I think of the .45acp I think of the Colt 1911 as they are both very iconic together.

Just some of my thoughts on the .45 acp

· In the middle of the cost range between the .40 and 9mm

· Heavy on the felt recoil. After firing the first shot your arms may move so much that it will take longer to get back on target for the follow up shot.

· The ammo is very common and when not in an ammo shortage very easy to find the ammo at competitive prices.

· An all around good caliber to carry as a secondary when hunting.

· Not all shooters are comfortable with the size and felt recoil of the .45.

The sizes of a lot of .45 handguns are large so they are not as easy to conceal. Not that there are not small frame .45s but when you are shooting a .45 you want to have as much grip on that firearm as possible.

9mm Review

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The 9mm is a good all around caliber. The round is not a clear winner to me in any one category so I believe the round should be looked at overall rather than broken down.

The round can have improved ballistics in some categories with a change in bullet weight or bullet type (ball to Hollow-point) depending on what your end goal for the round is.

When moving up in the caliber world from .22lr, one of the next steps to the general shooter might be to the 9mm.

· The ammo (Target or non defensive rounds) tends to be less expensive than the .40 or .45.

· The small round generally means less felt recoil (means better follow up shots)

· The market is flooded with different brands and models of 9mm so the average handgun is not going to be as expensive.

· More rounds can fit into a magazine.

.40 S&W Review

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As I said before, this round was designed with the thought of trying to take the best of the 9mm and the .45 acp and build a new round altogether.

The .40 S&W has become one of the more popular conceal carry rounds only surpassed by the 9mm (in a recent poll conducted buy gearsofguns.com) and followed by the .45 ACP.

Even with the popularity the .40 it is still the most expensive (per factory) round of the three.

· Slightly lower to equal to the 9mm when looking at magazine capacity

· Similar ballistics of the .45

· Less felt recoil than the .45

· Larger round (to the 9mm) means bigger hole.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, when people compare the 9mm to the .40 to the .45 acp they are comparing gun to gun to gun vs. ammo to ammo to ammo. When you factor out the gun and solely look at the ammo your opinion may change based on the type of shooting you plan to use the ammo for.

I love that the 9mm is inexpensive to shoot and still has felt recoil (unlike the .22lr)

I love the .45 ACP because of the manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feeling.

And I love the popularity and ballistics of the .40 S&W.

Written by Atticus James
Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Gearsofguns.com

About GearsofGuns:
Gears of Guns is a gun blog dedicated to bring information about everything in the Firearm industry. Gears of Guns strives to post the newest guns and latest gun related info we can. We personally try and test as many guns and products as we can. We talk to manufacturer’s representatives and ask the questions that you want answered. We spend many hours researching the information that we present here on the Gears of Guns blog so that you know that the information is true, tried and trustworthy. Visit: www.gearsofguns.com