SHOT Show 2017: Day 1 Video

SHOT Show stands for Shooting Hunting Outdoor Trade Show, It is held at the Sands convention center at the Venetian Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas NV USA. It is a private INDUSTRY ONLY show. As media, we are invited to come out and see all the new firearms in the Industry so we may bring you the viewer new content.

Day One:

We spent the day visiting with old friends and making many new ones.  Guys, this is 630,000 square feet of AWESOMENESS!  There are over 1600 companies to see and meet with.  On top of all that, over 65,000 people are at the show with me!  We are working fast and furious to find lots of new guns to bring in this year to review.

CGI: 7.62×39 Edition

This week on Cool Guns of The Internet: Today’s post is brought to you by The 7.62×39 and the interesting a small batch of guns that shoot it. If you have a firearm you would like us to post in next weeks CGI all you have to do is send us a picture of your firearms via email, at “pictures@gearsofguns.com” and we’ll post it! But tell us what the firearm is and for more flavor, tell us a story about the gun like a funny hunting trip, or a sentimental story about the gun! Make it as detailed as possible! And let us know who you are if you want photo credit!SKSPC: GearsofGuns.comCMMG MK47 KrinkPC: GearsofGuns.comGalil-ACE-B

CV-58PC:Jan Hrdonka This is not an AK although it is very similar Ruger M77 7.62x39Sig556XI RussianPC: SIGRPDPC: AIMSurplusRAS7 ak47PTR 32PC: GunsAmerica.comAR with 7.62x39 magazine

Freedom Ordnance FM-9 Belt Fed Upper Receiver

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Having a belt fed rifle sounds awesome doesn’t it? While everyone else is having to constantly change out magazines every 30 rounds or so, you are able to just keep slinging lead down range to your hearts content. Who wouldn’t enjoy that feeling?

Who Wants to Stop?

Until recently, you would have to cough up the dough to purchase a machine gun to enjoy such pleasures. And you know the cost of firing it would add up quickly; even .223 can cost quite a bit when you are shooting a couple thousand round. Because, let’s be honest, you’re not going to want to stop after a couple of boxes.

Firearm Cost vs Ammo Cost

Recently there has been a trend of semi-auto only “machine guns” being released. We recently reviewed one here by Ohio Ordnance. And while they are cheaper and easier to purchase than their full auto counterparts, the high cost for the firearm and the cost of ammo will quickly take its toll on your wallet.

Solutions

Freedom Ordnance has released what they believe to be the solution to this problem, with their FM-9 belt fed upper receivers. You can just take any AR15 or M16 lower that you currently own, and attach their complete upper. You now have a belt fed 9mm in your hands and the world’s largest grin on your face.

Elite Model

At a much cheaper cost of entry and the relatively cheap cost of ammunition, this seems to solve all problems of purchasing and owning a belt fed firearm that previously came with owning something this unique. Additionally, if you choose to purchase the Elite model, or elect to upgrade to it at a later date, you have the ability to quickly change the barrel.

While this may not seem like it would be an important feature, it will save you a lot of time waiting on your barrel to cool off. It will also help to extend your barrel’s life if used properly.

Shoot Slow? Hell NO!

Now let’s just be honest here, you are not going to be shooting this slowly! You will get this in your hands and want to throw ammo downrange as quickly as you can. That’s whole purpose of owning a belt fed; shooting fast and not having to reload every 30 rounds.

New Trigger

If you own a M16 lower or a drop in auto sear, this will be easy. Just thrown it into full auto and enjoy. If you are not fortunate enough to own one of those, don’t worry. This is still fun to shoot in semi auto, but I would recommend looking to purchase a binary trigger or a slide fire stock to simulate the full auto experience.

Quick Linker

The other thing that you will want to look into purchasing would be a quick linker. It is not necessary for the complete firearm to function, but will save you a lot of time and is well worth the investment.

What’s the Cost?

I know what you may be thinking, “this sounds great and all, but what is the catch? There has to be something wrong with it.” Well the price is still a little higher than I would expect at about $1300, but this is still much lower than the other belt fed options. And while Freedom Ordnance website does state that only certain ammunition seems to work well, the 9mm is still a relatively cheap round to fire.

Drawbacks?

The biggest drawback that I have seen for this system, is that when it comes time to purchase a new barrel (unfortunately, shooting fast you will probably go through barrels very quickly) you will have to buy Freedom Ordnance barrels and cannot select one from another manufacturer. This is to be expected, as nobody else has anything like this available. It also ensures that what you are putting on your gun will function as designed.

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Head Turning at the Range

For anyone looking for an exciting new toy for the range that is guaranteed to turn heads, I think does the trick. If you can’t afford something like the Ohio Ordnance 1919 or the FNH M249S, I think this is a great alternative. You still get the enjoyment of running a belt fed firearm, but at a much lower cost of ownership. Just throw some form of optic on it, and enjoy.

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The Operators Suppressor Systems (O.S.S.)

“110 year old suppression technology does not perform for modern operators. The next generation in suppression is here.” – Operators Suppressor Systems

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An Intro to Suppressors

Since we are on the topic of suppressors, let’s shed some light on the new suppressors in the market with a quick simple introduction.

The suppressors I am talking about is the patented Generation V Flow Through Technology, made by Operators Suppressor Systems located in Murray, Utah.

Introduced at ShotShow 2016

First introduced at ShotShow 2016, the Generation V Flow-Through Technology, is a patented state of the art suppressor.  I believe this will change how suppressors will be built for the years to come.

The Elite

Right now there are two types of OSS suppressors in the market. The first type is the Elite.  The Elite is built for a fully automatic rate of fire. The Elite can withstand six cycles of 8 thirty round magazines with 5.56 ammunition on full auto. This suppressor is forged to withstand the extremes of full-auto fire.

OSS BPR and OSS SRM

 The Helix

The next suppressor in the market is the Helix.  The Helix is designed and built for tactical, professional, hunting, and sport shooters demanding the best reduction. The “plug and play” also makes it convenient for you to fit on the barrel.

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Calibers

The available calibers in Elite, and Helix are;

5.56

7.62/30 Cal.

The .338, 50 Cal. and “Machine Gun” calibers are still being tested.  These calibers are scheduled to be released later this year.

The Helix and the Elite suppressor designs are both exclusively designed with the patented Generation V Flow-Through Technology and the rights are owned to Operators Suppressor Systems.

Stay tuned on how these suppressors work!

 

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Cool Guns: Shot Show 2016

Here is a collection of what we thought were some of the coolest looking guns that we got photos of at the show.  Some of them we know who made them and some we just don’t know.  If you can tell us, please comment and we will update the photo.

These photos are just a few of the best photos taken.  They are meant to show the variety of what is to be seen at Shot Show and are not necessarily a reflection of our editorial support.

 

 

Chiappa Trail Gun:

Chiappa Trail Gun

Daniel Defense:Cool Guns Daniel Defense

EliteIron:

Cool Guns 434EliteIron

 

Troy:

Troy Troy

Noreen Firearms:

Noreen Firearms

Sage Ordnance Systems Group:

Sage Ordnance Systems Group

Robinson Armament:

Cool Guns Robinson Armament 1Cool Guns Robinson Armament 2Cool Guns Robinson Armament

Ohio Ordnance Works:

Ohio Ordiance Works Browning 1918

 

Ohio Ordiance Works HCar 2Ohio Ordiance Works HCAR

Cool Gun 278 RagiusCool Gun 497 Cool Gun 331Cool Gun 496Cool Gun 726Cool Guns 161FlintlockCool Guns 532Cool Guns Go from Historical to Modern

Atticus James is traveling in India for the month of February.  You can follow his adventures at AtticusJames.com.  In the meantime, he has left all of the photos from Shot Show 2016 for those of us left behind to post for him.  (This would explain any issues with photos being mislabeled.  Apologies in advance if this happens).

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Before I talk about this 1919A4 belt fed firearm I have to talk about Ohio Ordnance Works. I have never met them in person but I can tell you I have the upmost respect for the men and women of this company. Normally when working with a firearm manufacturer I work with one person and if I have any problems they are the only one I can contact to get a problem resolved. This company however is not like that. When I had a problem with the 1919 on a Tuesday morning I did not speak to my contact Bob Conroy I spoke with the owner directly. I will talk more about that a little later on and help further explain why I have to open with these comments.

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

M1919A4 Specs+

Designed: 1919
Number built: 5 million
Variants: A1; A2; A3; A4; A5; A6; M37 and AN/M2
Weight: 31 lb (14 kg) (M1919A4)
Length: 37.94 in (964 mm) (M1919A4)
Barrel length: 24 in (610 mm)
Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield and 7.62×51mm NATO
Action: Recoil-operated/short-recoil operation
Rate of fire: 400–600 round/min
Feed system: 250-round belt

The OOW M1919A4 is classified as a belt fed rifle.  The machine gun classification is for full auto only, making this gun a semi auto and available without a NFA tax stamp.

The Backstory

As many of you may have already seen and heard, Ohio Ordnance Works has redesigned the BAR and made it their H.C.A.R. (Heavy Counter Assault Rifle). This is a very cool looking rifle but it honestly was not the first thing that peaked my interest when I first came to their website. While scrolling through their guns I saw the semi auto 1919A4 Bundle which is a SEMI AUTO belt fed tripod rifle. Side note: this means you cannot put the sig stabilizing brace on this and turn it into a pistol (I found this out at my FFL holders shop when I told him all the cool kids were making pistols and I wanted one too). When I saw that, the first thing that went through my head was this is AWESOME! who doesn’t want to own a belt fed gun? and that is when I saw the price. $3,997. I honestly figured they would have this priced to be closer to $7000+.   On top of all of that, the gun at the bottom of the page is a 1919A4 with a Cleaning Kit, Manual, Headspace & Timing Gage, and the .308 Trunnion Shield for $2500.

YOU ARE TELLING ME I CAN OWN A BELT FED RIFLE FOR THE SAME PRICE AS 2.5 AR-15s? Sign me up!

Let me put two images in your head.

1. You pull up to the range, get out of your truck, walk to the firing line and pull out the same plain Jane AR-15 that every other shmuck has and shoot it

or

2. You pull up to your private range, back up into your bay, unload a 1919 A4 out of your truck and not give a s**t about what anyone else thinks because you own a belt fed tripod rifle of glory?

That is what I thought.

OOW 1919A4 Bundle Specs

Bundle Includes:

· 1919A4 Semi-Auto

· Manual

· Tripod, Pintle, T&E

· Headspace & Timing Gage

· Custom Cut Pelican Case

· 1919A4 Linker

· Cleaning Kit

· 1,000 Links

· Spade Grip

· .308 Trunion Shield

· Parts to Convert Gun to .30-06

· Membership Access to Video Tutorial

The Bundle

When my gunsmith got the M1919A4 in he told me he saw the parcel service driver spending more time than normal in the back of the truck so he walked outside to see what the deal was and the driver told him he needed to get his dolly to carry this box into the shop. My gun smith told him that he didn’t need to worry he would just help him carry it in. In his words, “that was a mistake”.

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The pelican case isn’t grossly over heavy but it’s a long case that is meant to be carried using the handles or rolled using the built in wheels, making it easy to move. In the cardboard box it was heavy and awkward.

Inside of the custom cut Pelican case the rifle also comes with:
Manual
Tripod, Pintle, T&E
Headspace & Timing Gage
Cleaning Kit
Spade Grip
.308 Trunion Shield
and Parts to Convert the Gun to .30-06

You also get:

1000 Links (they link .308 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield and 8mm cartridges)
Membership Access to Video Tutorials (this is very important)
and the 1919A4 Linker

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The Ammo

Our good friends over at Luckygunner.com sponsored the .308 used in this review.
We used 1000 rounds of 308 Winchester 180 Gr Sp Prvi Partizan

Be sure to check them out for all your ammo needs.

Linking

When the rifle first came in Ohio Ordnance Works was out of stock of the linker so they shipped it without one. The crew and I had plans to get this gun on the range as quick as possible because it was going to rust from all the drooling if we didn’t.

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[1000 links in a plastic box I purchased)

I called over one of the guys to come help me hand load 500 rounds and I can tell you from experience this is a bloody ordeal and I am thankful I never have to do that with this gun ever again. It took two people about an hour of linking to get all the belts made (we made them into 40 round belts.)  When we got the linker in a few days later, it took me 23 minutes by myself to do the same amount.

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Shooting

As I said, we shot 1000+ rounds of .308 through the M1919A4. It was the most fun you can have without full auto.

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I tried both the spade grip as well as the standard grip and both of them are fun to shoot. I think I like the standard grip more because it means I don’t have to take the M1919A4 down to put it back in its case… maybe I am just lazy.

Changing Barrels and Cleaning

This gun comes with a membership to videos on how to change the barrel and take apart the gun and they do a much better job at explaining this than I can. I will say I have watched the videos every time I have cleaned this gun and when I had to fix the gun to insure I don’t miss anything. The videos are helpful and comprehensive.

The Problem and the Solution

On the first range trip, we shot about 250 rounds before I broke the gun. Yes I admit I broke it and I am kind of happy it happened. I have no idea why the detent pin bent but the pin that rides in the channel from the extraction arm bent out of place and stopped the gun from working. Ohio Ordnance Works said, “it was probably a fluke, a wriggling out of place by the pin. We’ve made tons of these and not had an issue like that. They are new/grad A surplus, so you may have found one that just wasn’t perfect.”

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I am happy about breaking the gun because of the experience I had afterwards. I hate breaking guns. I know as a reviewer I can be hard on gun but normally we know their limits and where the maximum amount of safe operating abuse is and we err on the side of caution. This however was not abuse. We were still warming the M1919A4 up when it bent.

This killed the mood at the range. Since this is a review gun and it was a weekday morning I called Ohio Ordnance Works to try and figure out what had happened. I spoke with the young lady who answered the phone and she told me, Bob Conroy wasn’t in the office.  She transferred me to Mr. Landies instead. Under stress, my vocabulary resorts to almost grunting so when Mr. Landies got on the phone and started helping me he was very understanding at my lost of proper terminology and told me that a picture is worth 1000 words or in my case 3 words and a grunt. So I e-mailed a photo of the bent part and he e-mailed me back just a few minutes later asking for a shipping address.

The following day I had my whole family over for lunch. When I got a knock at my door from the shipper with the part, you might say I was very surprised. I had figured I wouldn’t get this gun fixed for a few days at a minimum, but they overnighted the part to me. This blew me away, no one does that. No one ships you the part overnight unless it is a dire emergency. To say the least, I was impressed.

About a month ago, while on Instagram, I saw that Ohio Ordnance Works had posted a picture of a gentleman holding a beautiful rifle with the caption of Happy birthday boss… Mr. Landies. As it turns out I wasn’t transferred to some shop floor guy who builds the rifles but to the owner of the company. Again… no one does that.

After fixing the gun we took it back on the range a few weeks later and the gun ran like a champ. Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 6.28.23 PM

Final Thoughts

The gun is battle tested. I never had any doubts that this was a good gun, if it wasn’t, it would not still be in service all over the world.
While owning this 1919A4 only makes me feel cooler in my head, I know that I will not be taking this out to the range every Sunday. I know that it is a special occasion gun than is very expensive to just play with.

This is a gun that has a lot of history attached to it and since Ohio Ordnance Works has made this M1919A4 to be as affordable to own as possible I think it is a very nice piece to have in anyone’s collection. Plus, when your friends are bragging that they own a Tavor or a SCAR 17 you can just look at them and say “that’s cute, I own a belt fed tripod rifle”.

I have been very impressed with this company from the first time I spoke with them on the phone. They have always been very helpful and ready to work with us. I know I say this a lot, but I truly love the gun community. There is, bar none, not a single community with more caring and awesome people.

Editorial: Standardizing vs. Proprietary

A few weeks back I reviewed a Windham Weaponry .308 AR style rifle. When I finished the review I contacted my local gunsmith as well as Windham and asked if they knew of any standardization in the .308 AR market.  I wanted to know if anyone had made a pattern for the upper and lower as well as the Bolt Carrier Group (BCG).

standard vs proprietary

The question seemed straight forward, however the answer isn’t. Long story short, no. No one has made a standard to which everyone is following.

(Note: I am using the 5.56×45 and the .223 Remington interchangeably in the article even though they are not the same cartridge.  AR stands for Armalite Rifle not Assault Rifle).

History

In 1955 and 1956 Armalite designed the first prototypes of the original AR-10 chambered in the 7.62×51 (.308 Winchester.)  By 1957, the first AR-15 using the intermediate cartridge 5.56×45 NATO was designed and then sold to Colt due to financial problems that Armalite was having.

Is Anything New Anymore?

Since the AR-10 was designed before the AR-15 it would seem we haven’t taken a step forward but a step back in time. Thanks to Government bans, such as the 1994 Assault Weapon Ban that ended in 2004 and other set backs, the modern sporting rifle world has been trying to play catch up for the past 11 years.

Intermediate vs. Rifle Cartridges

I have never really been a fan of the .223 Remington (5.56x45NATO) and I know I am not alone in this distaste. I have always liked the 7.62x39mm or the newer .300 AAC Blackout when it comes to intermediate cartridges. The .308 win is a rifle cartridge that fits more than just the distance shooting bill. The fact of the matter is that the .308 and the 5.56 have been on the battle field for almost the same amount of time and yet we chose the less ballistically versatile round for civilian and military applications.

DPMS/SR-25 Magazines vs. Proprietary

When building a new firearm platform you have to consider the way your firearm is going to hold rounds. In the the bolt action world we typically use an in-stock style magazine, for the lever actions and shotguns we use a tube and elevator (shell carrier) system, for the semi and full autos we have a choice. Belt fed (seen mainly in past in full auto only but is making it way back in semi auto versions of full auto machine guns) or magazine fed.

The .308 ARs are all based on the smaller AR-15, so you would think after seeing the success of the AR-15 magazine market it would be smarter to stick with what works. But we are still in a relearning stage in the firearm world about supply and demand. The FN SCAR 17 uses a proprietary .308 mag but the SCAR 16 uses STANAG (AR-15 style magazines). When FN released the SCAR 17 to the general population they had problems keeping magazines in stock because they were trying to keep the military contracts filled and just they couldn’t keep up with demand. That’s a problem with proprietary.

The DPMS/SR-25 style magazines are now being made by a number of different magazine manufacturers which means I can order as many as I want.

Standardizing

The AR-15 is known as the Legos for adults. Everything is changeable. If I want a nickel boron BCG I can find a company I like and replace mine in my AR-15.  If I want a new charging handle I get one. If I want to put a .50BMG bolt action upper on my lower I can. This seems to me like a great idea. However in the .308 AR world we have yet to reach an agreement as to what the specs should be.

Final thoughts

Until they all come to an agreement about standardizing, the consumer market for the .308 AR is left with fewer options.  To me, more options means more money back in the pockets of the firearm manufacturers.  More money to the manufacturers means more money can be spent on R&D, which means more advanced guns in the future.

Poll: What does your range offer you?

Typically there are three different types of ranges a shoot can go to. A range open to the public, a range that is members only and requires a yearly or monthly fee or land you or a friend owns that you normally shoot on.

Today we are polling about what your range offers you and your shooting experience. If you shoot on your own land or a friends land please only answer that part of the poll.

What does your range offer you polll

The polls have been split between Public and membership ranges. Please select all that apply to your range.

 

Bren Gun Cutaway

Way back in 2011 HansonROBB sent us a collection of pictures of a Colt XM15  (M-16) rifle cutaway which you can find HERE. He has sent us a new batch of pictures of a cutaway Bren Light Machine Gun.

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BREN GUN (3)

BREN GUN (4)

BREN GUN (5)

BREN GUN (6)

BREN GUN (7)

BREN GUN (8)

BREN GUN (9)

This is a very beautiful collection of photos of the Bren Gun.

–Thanks HansonROBB

Aaron – MG42

When it comes to automatic weapons many firearms comes to mind, The M2 (ma deuce), M249 SAW, M16 and other variants. But the first that comes to my mind is the German MG42.

mg42_02

The MG42 is the successor to the earlier MG34. The rifle was introduced in 1942 which is where the number 42 comes from. This machine gun was in service from 1942-1968. When they were updating to the MG42 from the MG34 they improved on the internal working components with a brand new locking mechanism. The gun was made largely from stamped parts which decreased production cost and time when the German army had a small arms shortage. The MG42 had an effective range of 1000 meters and fired a blistering 1,200-1,500 rounds per minute sounding more like tearing a piece of canvas that the allied soldiers feared. The designers made it fast and easy to change barrels, about six seconds for each change. The MG42 like the 34 was a very needy weapon system due to dirt and debris regularly jammed the weapon if unchecked. The MG42 was lighter than earlier era machine guns. The gunner could carry the gun with the front mounted bipod and his assistant gunner would carry the ammo. The MG34 and 42 threw down a storm of lead from the eastern front to the beaches of Normandy. This was a terrifyingly successful mounted or squad managed machine gun. The history of the MG42 is still going on. They may not manufacture this weapon or have it in full service in any nation but they have still made it around the world regardless of the fact. This weapon from WWII is still in people’s collection and is still spitting its fire around the world.

Close… but not the Johnson 1941

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On Monday we posted a name this gun (seen above) and we got a number of comments and  emails thinking it was the Johnson M1941 Light Machine Gun. (Seen at the bottom of this post) The answer is the Johnson M1944 LMG.

 

Caliber: .30-06 (7.62×63)
Weight: 6.48 kg
Length: 1066 mm
Barrel length:558 mm
Feed Type: magazine, 20 rounds
Rate of fire: 300 – 900 rounds per minute (variable)

The M1941 light machine gun was developed from a semi-automatic rifle designed by Melvin C. Johnson during the late 1930s. It was intended to fulfill the role of a squad automatic weapon, and possibly replace the venerable Browning M1918 BAR. Johnson’s gun was significantly lighter than the BAR, while having a quick-detachable barrel and a magazine of the same capacity. However, regardless of its merits, Johnson’s LMG shared the fate of its sister rifle, being completely rejected by US Army officials. The Dutch East Indies government placed orders for some M1941 LMG in 1941, but the East Indies were occupied by Japan before deliveries were completed, so the remaining stocks of the gun were purchased by the US Government and issued in limited numbers to Army Rangers and other special operations groups. Later in the war, Johnson developed an improved version of the LMG,known as M1944. This replaced the wooden buttstock with a tubular steel one, and the folding bipod with a telescoping monopod; it also found no luck in USA, but a copy was briefly made in Israel in the 1950s as the Dror LMG.

The M1941 LMG is short-recoil operated, air-cooled, magazine-fed weapon. The barrel is locked using a rotary bolt with multiple radial lugs that engage the barrel extension. The barrel is enclosed within a short tubular sleeve with cooling slots, and can be quickly removed for replacement if overheated, or for compact transportation. It is a selective fire weapon, firing from an open bolt in the automatic mode (for better cooling), and from a closed bolt in the semi-automatic mode (for better accuracy). The return spring runs at the top of the butt, and the gun has an adjustable buffer which allows the cyclic rate of fire to be changed according to the mission.
The feed is from detachable curved box magazines, which are inserted horizontally from the left. Quite unusually, Johnson magazines hold cartridges in a single row. Another interesting feature of the Johnson is that its magazines can be replenished while inserted in the gun, using standard 5-round clips for the M1903 rifle. In this case, cartridges are loaded through the loading port at the right side of the tubular receiver, which is situated below the ejection port. This is possible regardless of the bolt position (open or closed), due to the fact that magazine is located blow the barrel and cartridges are lifted to the loading line via special ramp, built into the receiver (the same ramp also serves as a loading port cover). Furthermore, the Johnson magazine does not have feeding lips, but it has an automatic catch which holds cartridges inside until released by projection in the magazine housing. Feed lips are integral part of the receiver, providing more reliable feed (damaged magazine feed lips often cause feed problems).
The M1941 is fitted with wooden butt and short wooden handguard. A light folding bipod is fitted to the barrel jacket in front of the handguard.

Modifications.
M1944
: a further evolution of M1941. Basic action is the same but wooden butt is replaced by metallic butt, which consists of two steel tubes with attached buttplate. Bipod is replaced by lighter folding monopod, which also can serve as a forward “assault” grip.

 

[Info from World Guns]

 

 

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Johnson M1941 Light Machine Gun

 

Thank you to everyone who guessed this weeks gun.