Targetvision Short Range Wireless Spotting Scope Review

At SHOT Show 2014 I met Clay Rhoden one of the co-founders of TARGETVISION at media day at the range. Having just finished reviewing a similar short range target camera viewing system, I was interested in seeing what TARGETVISION had done differently. Two of the most noticeable things I first saw was that it was a self contained camera and wireless transmitter housed in a plastic tube vs. the tool box the other company uses. The other thing was the HD camera that they use.

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There were three items total that were shipped to me. The camera system, the charging cord and a small tripod that the camera screws into. This means there isn’t much to misplace. This is a big thing for me since I carry a large amount of gear to the range.

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When I first used the camera, the picture (seen below) was blurry. I called the company from the range and spoke with Clay at TARGETVISION. He, at first, thought it might have been a defective camera. After a couple of conversations, he wanted me to try some different things before we shipped it back. In the meantime, for whatever reason, the camera recalibrated itself when we got home and the next week we had a very clear and crisp video.

At the range
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A week later.

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I am a red blooded male and I admit I do not like to read manuals. As a reviewer, I admit, I should know better. TARGETVISION sent not one, but TWO guides. The 19 page manual and birthday card size quick start guide. Again, I did not read either of them and I thought more was wrong with the camera than really was. The camera tube is meant to be 10-15 feet away from the target and off to the side so you do not shoot it. We were use to my other system, which sits about 6 feet away from the target. Don’t be like me and skip reading the important information TARGETVISION sends you. It is not because they want to send you one more booklet for you to lose but so you know how to use your $595 targeting system.

Setting the System

As you can see in the pictures, there are no wires you have to mess with. The TARGETVISION System is pretty much turn the device on, connect to the devices to wifi, open the app and shoot.

App

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I used the system on my iPhone 4s, 6 and my android (don’t judge me) tablet. The system worked great across all three devices. I do prefer to use the tablet over the phones simply because of the larger screen.

Overall Thoughts

I am a big tech fan and I like seeing how new technology is helping me become a better reviewer and better shooter as we have more and more things to assist in giving us instant data to get the round on target better and faster.

I have to note that when the TARGETVISION system is sitting in a 100 yard long wind tunnel with 12 foot high walls of steel belted radial tires the camera does not always connect quickly or stay connected. I don’t spend much time in them so it wasn’t really a problem but it was worth noting. This has to do with how wifi signal carries and not the device.

A feature I would like to see is integration of a ballistic calculator in the app. Also on that note, I would like to see more community involvement so integration can be like the health app on the iPhone which allows you to better track your health with different devices all in one app.  The more data we can share all in one place the better and safer shooters we all become.

TARGETVISION is one of the companies who first had a product like this. I liked the camera for 3 reasons: It was easy to set up, easy to use, and all self contained. Being able to mark your shots is important but it is a feature on the other cameras so it doesn’t play as much of a factor into my review as that is the norm.

Leupold Mark AR MOD 1 1.5-4x20mm Firedot-G SPR Review

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I suck at shooting. There I have admitted it, they always say the first step to recovery is to admit you have a problem. Now I could bore you with all kinds of completely legitimate excuses reasons why I suck. I could tell you it is because the ammo we use is cheap and doesn’t have the correct tracking software installed for the paper targets we use. I could also tell you it is because the large hadron collider causes abnormal parallaxes in the scope making me see the bullseye 6 inch low. Maybe I could tell you it is because my parents told me from a young age that if I didn’t eat all my brussel sprouts I would grow up to be a poor shot. All of these excuses reasons are one hundred and seven percent accurate and my reason for my lousy groupings.

But today I want to talk about what has helped my shooting when the large hadron collider is on.  LEUPOLD & STEVENS.
All joking aside, to say I like Leupold scopes would be an understatement. They are one of my favorite companies to work with because they are just good people making great products.  Over the past few years the GEARS Crew has purchased a number of scopes from them, the latest being the Leupold Mark AR MOD 1 1.5-4x20mm with Firedot-G SPR Reticle.

I reviewed this scope for a member of the GEARS Crew who we haven’t introduced yet, due to timing issues, but will be working behind the scenes in a number of future projects.

I had this scope on the Windham .308 AR we reviewed a few months back. After shooting with this scope for a month I almost went out and purchased a second scope for myself for this rifle, that is how much I loved it.

Normally for my AR platforms I like red dots. I don’t really care to spend much time behind a tube scope shooting unless I am shooting farther than 100 yards. I prefer to use my bolt action rifles on anything past 100 yards because I like the feel of the action more than the semi auto recoil. To all rules, there is always an exception, this combo is my exception. With this scope and rifle combo I was having fun ringing steel at 300 yards and almost ran 150 rounds just doing that. To say that the rifle with this scope paired together made for a match(grade) made in heaven might just RING true.

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I really didn’t care much about the illuminated reticle as I never shot in anything but bright day light.
The Firedot-G SPR reticle is Mil Dot and makes for quick changes when engaging targets at different distances.

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I really don’t have much to say on this scope other than how much I liked it. This scope made for great shooting at everything from 7 feet to 300 yards (max range we used it at).

At the price of a magnifier and red dot, this scope comes under by half (if not more) in most cases, at $564.99 for the illuminated and $374.99 for the Duplex. (below)

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After years of uses I have found that my Leupold’s have always held up from trips to the range and being jostled around in the backseat of my pickup on old dirt roads.

Time and time again they have showed me that they know how to make quality and dependable scopes and make you want to return for more.

Editorial: Modernizing the Wheel vs. Newly Invented

I was talking with someone the other night about guns (Yes, I do talk about other things than guns… sometimes) when they asked what I thought was the 5 top new innovations were in the industry. This is a topic I have been wanting to write about for a while, I just have never had the words.

M1 vs SCAR

When it comes to the gun industry we have cycles we go through. The inventing and learning cycle and what I call the modernizing of the wheel. In the inventing and learning cycle we have invented things like the tube sights for long distance shooting and learned things like rifling. With the modernizing the wheel cycle, which we are currently in, we are just finding ways to make these older designs fit the 21 century.

In the 1950s and 1960s the .308 Winchester and the .223 Remington made their debut in the in the shooting world and we are still using them as a our standard calibers. The FN-H SCAR is a modernized version of the FAL. The target cameras are the updated version of a spotting scope.

Don’t get me wrong, I am happy with the advancements we have made. However, I want to see something new. I want to live in a time like my grandfathers era when a lot of new things were introduced.  He saw the explosion of “modern guns with the invention of the  “plastic gun” or “black gun”, He also saw the invention of the standardized 30 round magazines as well as being able to control the muzzle climb with an intermediate cartridge.

I am not saying we don’t live in a time without people like Eugene Stoner and Mikhail Kalashnikov.  I am just saying we haven’t really seen something that has made a small arms like the M16 or M14 go almost obsolete. We saw the M16 quickly replace the M14 as the US service rifle in the 1960s.

As strange as it might seem, history shows us that the government is the main reason for innovation and invention in this industry. Until a government demands a new product to suit their new need, we do not see new creations. A government contract can be in the price range of billions which goes towards R&D and eventual release to the general public.

While some might think with the increased use of drones, it may be a long time before we see anything new.  I am a believer that we will always need boots on the ground, if for no other reason than for intelligence gathering, for aid and for maintaining goodwill.  I am excited and hopeful for the future of our industry.

Poll: Tech in Shooting

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I have noticed as I go to the range lately, I carry out about 75 pounds of gear. This doesn’t even include my guns and their respective cases.

Range Tech in the Range Bag

While a lot of what I carry to the range is related to reviews and just normal work equipment, I have noticed that over the past few years my distance range tech as increased and yet my range distance hasn’t.

I have observed more people with lasers and lights and camera mounts on their $700 M&P-15. I have asked a few why they have this mounted at all times and they tell me that they just need it. Mind you this is not your SWAT officers or Texas National Guard, I am talking to, but that guy who has been in the semi-auto rifle game for 2 years.

Constant Evolution

Like most every other industry, we are subject to constant evolution with the tech world. I carry out my electronic spotting scope for any shots over 25yds. I wear electronic ear muffs to help me hear and still mute the shooting. I use laser trainers at home to help me with my rifle and pistol skill. Tech is replacing the old school shooting world which is helping us with our shooting skills.

Old School

I look back to my grandfather’s era of hunting and shooting and how the trail cameras were the tracks you saw on the ground, the e-spotting scopes were binoculars and monocular spotting scopes, the laser trainers were tin cans on a fence.

It is interesting to me, to see the distance shooters at my local range who are much older and the worries they have are about the clarity of their glass on their high end scope and the twist rates of their bolt action rifles. Then I see the younger shooters looking for every piece of tech they can get their hands on to make them the next top shot.

Controversy

Personally, I love the tech. Even with how tech is changing and making some interesting splashes in the gun industry. Some tech is even controversial such as the Barrett Optical Ranging System (BORS) or the Tracking point systems giving shooter an easier time making the right calculations to hit their target out at 1000+ yards.

Shooting World has Room for All

Change can be scary to some people. All I know is that you can adapt to the new tech in shooting or not. Old school and new school, both have their amazing shooters who defy what we think is possible.

Mossberg ATR™ NIGHT TRAIN™ 27204 .308 Bolt Action Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Normally I don’t put the model number in the title but with the number of different options Mossberg offers  for the rifle I want to be specific on which rifle I reviewed.

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Specs

Caliber: .308 WIN
Capacity: 5
Barrel: 22” Fluted
Rail: 6” Picatinny Rail
Scope: UTG 6-24x50MM w/ Illuminated Reticle, Sun Shade and Lens Protectors
Twist: 1:10
Length Of Pull: 13.25″
Finish: Matte Blue
Stock: Synthetic (Multi-Cam Camo)
Weight: 9.5 lb
Overall Length: 42″
MSRP: $891

Features:

LBA Lightning Bolt Action Adjustable Trigger
Free-Floating Button-Rifled Fluted Barrel
Scope and Bipod Included
4+1 Capacity, Top Load Magazine
Free Gun Lock/2-Year Limited Warranty

First Impressions

Growing up in the Boy Scouts, I knew Mossberg for two reasons. They made the Mossberg .22 bolt action rifles my troop owned for shooting sports and we had a Mossberg 500 12 Gauge shotgun we would use. When I was in the market for a new 12 Gauge I contacted Mossberg because they make the Mossberg 500 Flex which lets you customize your shotgun for your shooting needs.

You can pick up a wide range of different parts to make your gun more tactical or more home defense. If you want to keep it a normal bird gun, you can change the length of pull with different recoil/length of pull pads that snap in and out of the buttstock.  After a year of shooting the Mossberg 500 Flex 12 gauge, I wanted to do more work with Mossberg.

I requested the Mossberg ATR™ NIGHT TRAIN™ 27204 .308 Bolt Action Rifle for review. The gun, out of the box, makes you feel like you were just handed a sniper rifle and you are going to be able to take down all the bad guys from 4 miles* away. The scope is over a foot and a half long (w/ sun shade) and it has a the multi-cam stock fluted barrel and bipod.

Man, this Mossberg ATR looks like it can hit a dime from miles away*. (* The GEARs Crew understands that the max effective range of a .308 Win is 800-1000 meters. The distances named are for this writers dramatic impact only and should not be the expected results.)

Shooting and Feel

After getting the Mossberg ATR sighted and realigned I started out shooting 20 rounds at the 100 yard range getting the rounds to go through the same hole. When I felt comfortable, I moved on to the 300 yard range and noticed that the optic was fuzzy in the beginning. I had expected this, since it is not a very high end scope.

I had the steel gong as my target which I figured I would hand load each round and do a rapid engagement of 10 (3-5 seconds per shot to reload) back to the 300 yard target, even with my speed the rifle maintained about a 6 inch grouping. After about 80 rounds my shoulder was not fatigued. The rifle had the right length of pull for my size, making this rifle rather enjoyable to shoot with all day.

The barrel is threaded into the action and not one solid piece. This is normal, however the chamber is not as forgiving to someone who is hand loading each round vs. using the magazine to load the rounds. I would have liked to have seen a feed ramp on this, but for the price of the Mossberg ATR, it still feeds like it should.

The bolt does have good play and good flow when manipulating the bolt to load rounds.

The recoil as mentioned above is not overwhelming so if you shot more than 100 rounds you shouldn’t be running for the ice pack.

Scope

The UTG scope is good if you are not planning to shoot past 100 yards. The scope that Mossberg mounted on this rifle was fuzzy until we shot about 20+ rounds. The scope prisms must have moved to the correct spot and cleared up enough to shoot the 200 yard range. It was still fuzzy and hazy at 300 to the point you could not see your hits on high visible targets.

When we first took the rifle to the range the scope had not been zeroed and it took about 20 rounds to zero in. I never used the Illuminated Reticle since it was a bright sunny day every day we went to shoot.

With this being said, if I am able to continue reviewing this rifle, I would look at a relatively inexpensive scope upgrade to a Redfield Revenge 6-18x44mm scope with an MSRP of $314.  This upgrade keeps the look of the rifle and scope package with a better optic.

Bipod and Rail

The Caldwell bipod is “adjustable” however, when I tried adjusting the height, the legs never matched up enough to give a stable shooting platform. Thankfully, I did most of my shooting off the bench and not from prone, so the short legs were at the correct height.   I personally feel that Mossberg would have been better suited to have the bipod attached by picatinny rail verses the “permanently” mounted Caldwell. In keeping with how I would upgrade this rifle, I would unmount the bipod and have a gunsmith mount a 3” picatinny rail on the flat bottom of the stock allowing for a bipod and other types of sling mounts.

The scope rail is a 5” picatinny rail. This is nice, but in terms of upgrading this rifle I would change to Leupold dovetail scope rings and so I would have to change the rail. Mossberg does make this possible as the rail is not wielded to the action.

Modularity

Mossberg introduced the Mossberg flex line of shotguns and MVP rifles. Although this rifle doesn’t need to be changed into a pistol grip rifle, I would have liked to have seen the buttstock length of pull modularity added into the design of the of the ATR™ NIGHT TRAIN line of centerfire rifles.

I think Mossberg is really onto the next gen of designs by adding features like the modularity they have already introduced. It would be great if companies like MAGPUL who already make stocks for Mossberg shotguns started adding new stocks and parts to Mossberg Flex line of modular rifles and shotguns.

Trigger

For those of us who are trigger snobs, you should like the Mossberg’s no gunsmith needed adjustable trigger. I didn’t mess with this trigger adjustment as I was having issues with the scope and my review focus changed.

Final Thoughts

The Mossberg ATR was designed for someone getting into the art of distance shooting. This gun is for someone who doesn’t want to spend $800 on a bolt action rifle that won’t have a long life and then drop another $400 or $500 on scopes and rings and bipods just to get your first shot down range. This gun has it all for $891 MSRP.

Out of the box, this rifle is ready to be sighted in and taken on a hunting trip or just to the distance range. The upgrades I have talked about are not something you will have to get if you are starting out and learning how to shoot. As a shooter gets more proficient at shooting longer and longer ranges that is the time to start thinking about upgrading.

I have loved shooting the Mossberg ATR. As a proficient distance shooter, I would love to be able to report back with my findings after some simple upgrades to an already extremely well built bolt action.

POLL: What is your MAIN sight you use on your go to MSR?

Nikki With Leupold Scope | Gearsofguns.com

While in the gun shop this past week I overheard a conversation between a new AR-15 owner and his friend asking about what his main optic should be.

I have been asked this question a lot over the years and I always ask them a few questions before I give them my opinion.

  1. How often do you plan to shoot this rifle?
  2. You have just dropped $1000+ on a rifle what is your optic budget? Also what other accessories do you plan to use on this rifle and what is your budget for that?
  3. What kind of shooting do you intend to do with this rifle? Bench rest (distance), short range (100yds max/ home defense) or a mix of both?
  4. Do you plan on taking any shooting classes with this rifle?

After hearing their responses I have a better idea as to what kind of shooter they are and what they might want.

What kind of questions do you ask yourself before you make a decision on your optic choice?

 

Panzer – Leupold VX-3 3.5-10X40mm Reviewed

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This review will start like so many of my previous in Las Vegas at the Shot Show 2013. Since I was planning an elk hunting trip that fall  and had very little knowledge about optics and sights I made it my mission to collect as much info as possible. I had done a little long-range shooting but never took the time to learn the subtle nuances of high-powered rifle optics. Five months later and the final search for a scope was on. We followed up with Leupold and spoke with Sarah Kirby who is the Marketing Communications Assistant for Leupold & Stevens, Inc. She was very eager to help us find the perfect scope for what we needed. The attention to customer detail is phenomenal at Leupold, anything we needed and even things we had not thought of Sarah was ready to help. After consulting with her scope experts at Leupold they suggested the Leupold VX-3-10X40mm with the Matte 1 in reticle. She explained it might take 6-8 weeks for the scope to arrive and within 3 weeks I had my new scope. We forgot to ask for the mounting rings but a week later she suggested the Leupold duel dovetail mounting system for my Winchester model 70.  It is possible to mount the scope yourself, but in order to ensure a perfectly aligned scope I took it to SMR firearms because my gunsmith had the right tools and expertise.

Here is a list of the specs for the VX-3.

Low

High

Actual Magnification

3.30x

9.70x

Linear Field of View (ft/100 yd)

29.80ft

11.00ft

Linear Field of View (m/100 m)

9.90m

3.70m

Eye Relief (in)

4.40 inches

3.60 inches

Eye Relief (mm)

112.00mm

91.00mm

Weight (oz)

12.60oz

Weight (g)

357.00 g

Objective Clear Aperture (in)

1.60 inches

Objective Clear Aperture (mm)

40.00mm

Elevation Adjustment Range

52.00 moa

Windage Adjustment Range

52.00 moa

As I previously mentioned I had a little experience with long range shooting but never had I hunted large game in the mountains and the last thing I wanted was my scope to be the reason I missed my shot. I needed to be able to take down a large game at 300 yards with as clear of an image as possible.  The first day I tested the scope at TDSA range in Ferris TX, I learned the difference between sub par optics and superior quality.  With the help of a friend at TDSA, who was much more skilled, I sighted my rifle in at 200 yards using the non-turreted toolless finger adjustments. It was fairly easy to figure out how to dial in correct adjustments with 1 cm per click. With the generous eye box I had no problem quickly finding the sweet spot in the scope and setting up for the shot whether at 25 or 300 yards. My favorite feature is the adjustable power ring which acts like a zoom dial quickly bringing distant targets into clear view. My confidence level quickly grew as I pushed my abilities to their limits combining the dependable accuracy of my rifle with the preciseness of VX-3 optics.

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The proudest moment for me was once I put my money where my mouth was at the range in Colorado right before the hunt. My father, who accompanied me, was ready to see what I could do. After hitting a perfect bull’s-eye I proceeded to do it 3 more times at 300, 350 and then 400 yards at varying elevations. I turned around and noticed my dad with a look of satisfaction that meant “alright I think you are ready”. Thanks to all the time at the range in Texas I was very comfortable with what the Leupold VX-3 has allowed me to shoot at various elevations and distances. Most impressive was that I didn’t need to mess with the scope after a month which included a 13 hour drive and a very rough ride on the back of the ATV. I didn’t have to worry about my accuracy because the durability of the scope design protected it from bumps.

While in the mountains the elements put my equipment to the test with rain, mud, snow and ice on the daily. I noticed my eye glasses were fogging regularly while my scope remained crystal clear. Usually Leupold uses nitrogen gas sealed inside the scope which prevents condensation on the lens but with elect scope models, as with the VX-3, uses 2nd generation Argon/Krypton Waterproofing which not only reduces the effects of thermal shock, but also works better at preventing fogging and condensation inside the scope from forming. My other concern was scratching the lens since dirt and dust were inevitable out there. What  I did not realize at the time was that my scope was treated with lens coating called DiamondCoat 2 which not only protects the lens from abrasion but greatly enhances light transmission which increase clarity.

2nd Generation Argon/Krypton Waterproofing

While we still waterproof other optics with bone-dry nitrogen – technology pioneered by Leupold® – Select models feature our exclusive, proprietary Argon/Krypton gas blend. Its advantages are two fold: it nearly eliminates the effects of thermal shock, and the Argon/Krypton molecules are significantly larger than nitrogen molecules, reducing the diffusion of gases sealed inside your scope even more than our proven nitrogen technology already does. We pioneered riflescope waterproofing, and now with Argon/Krypton we’re exceeding the standards we set ourselves.

[From the Leupold.com website]

Overall Thoughts and comments:

After all the time I practiced for that perfect 300 yard shot my elk walked a mere 50 ft. in front of me. I truly enjoyed the opportunity to take the Leupold VX-3 with me on the hunt and have learned what superior quality optics can do when put to the test. Overall I feel the Leupold VX-3 is a reliable scope for the hunter or range shooter because it offers flexibility, durability and top of the line quality for around $600 MSRP. For middle of the road cost you get top quality glass from a company that in my experience not only goes out of their way for you, but seems to take great pride in their craftsmanship as evidenced by the life time warranty.  I was unable to find anything wrong with my scope, and  trust me I did try, but I can not wait for my next hunting trip.

Pros and Cons:

  • Easy to use from box to sighting in.
  • Durable design meant did not have to worry about easily getting damaged and stood up to the elements.
  • The adjustable power ring for clear image at various distances
  • DiamondCoat 2 for abrasion resistance and enhanced light transmission
  • Non-turreted toolless adjustment for windage and elevation made sighting in actually fun
  • Eye box and eye relief made for easy target spotting at various distances

Redring Shotgun Sight Review

A few months back I was contacted by Redring Shotgun Sights to see if we would be interested in reviewing their sight.

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Of course I said yes since shotguns are one of my favorite firearms. They relate so well with one of my favorite quotes by Ashleigh Brilliant “To be sure of hitting the target, shoot first, and call whatever you hit the target.” With the shotgun I just pull the trigger and tell everyone that I wasn’t aiming for that clay pigeon but that there was a fly that I hit with extreme accuracy. Now that I have the Redring shotgun sight I have been refining my clay pigeon hitting abilities since they can be a trickier target to hit than that fly I mentioned earlier…

All joking aside, this sight has been a nice addition to my two shotguns. The sight compliments the Browning BPS and gives a look of tacti-cool when I have it on my Mossberg 500 Flex.

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The sight is, in my opinion, over priced at this time at about $749. Since you can buy an EO Tech for $300 for an AR tactical platform that is battle proven with higher accuracy, for the consumer market this just seems high to me. Let’s face it, the sight can cost more than the shotgun it is attached to. However don’t take that comment as saying the sight is not worth having if you like shooting your shotgun for hunting or sport. The Redring shotgun sight quickly improved my accuracy and even helped retrain me back to using the bead when the sight was turned off.

After about the third trip with the Redring I was hitting about 9/10 or 10/10 and I was able to teach someone who had never shot clays before to hit 5/10 in about 15 minutes of shooting. I believe that says a lot for the product.

A few changes I personally would like to see:

If they would make the sight a quick detach since it takes a few minutes to change the sight from one gun to another.

A lower price would open the market to all classes of shooters.

Overall Thoughts:

I have enjoy using this sight and I keep it on my Mossberg because I am almost always hitting my intended target with it on. Flies no longer have to be on the lookout for me!

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Bullseye Camera Systems 500 Yard Edition review

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I contacted  Bullseye Camera Systems a few months back to review their Bullseye Camera Systems 500 Yard Edition.

The company was founded in 2012 and I rate it as one of the best new pieces of shooting gear for 2013.

While Panzer was prepping for an elk hunt this past October, we spent day after day at the rifle range to hone his distance shooting skills with his new rifle. Before starting to talk with Bullseye Camera Systems, we were utilizing every binocular, scope and spotting scope we had, to judge each shot taken. Every 10 or so shots we had to walk the 200-300 yards to cover previous shots with stickers to get clean readings.  The back and forth trips down the range kills a good 15% to 50% of your day at the range.

The Bullseye Camera Systems is just that… a target viewing system that sits near your target.

“No more walking back and forth to the target! Spend more time shooting!” – Bullseye Camera System Facebook page.

The system comes with:
– Weatherproof camera w/night vision
– 5-hour rechargeable battery
– Router and antenna
– Tripod and connectors
– Secure carrying case
– Bullseye Target Manager Software on a flash drive
Works with any laptop running Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 or 8.

I know a few “purists” who believe that when it comes to shooting, old school is best and not use any tech. The two “purists” that I showed this system to, both thought this was a great for young and old alike since most people can’t see a .22 caliber hole in a paper at 200+ yards away.

The system is practically no maintenance  other than keeping the batteries charged and periodic free software updates.

During use, twice the system battery lasted longer than the laptop, so we just had to make a quick change of laptops by simply switching the flash drive. No download needed.

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After every shot you make, by hitting the spacebar on the laptop, the Bullseye Target Manager Software takes a still shot of the target. The software then flashes between the two most recent still shots comparing them. 

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The set up is as easy as setting up the tripod, mounting the camera, plugging the two USB cables into the battery pack, connecting the flash drive to your laptop and running the program.

Bullseye Camera Systems has two options:  500 yard or 1000 yard with an upgrade option for 1 mile. Both systems are similar, aside from the antenna which boosts the Wi-Fi range on the camera.

The base systems (without laptops) are $449 for the 500 yard and $549 for the 1000 yard system. Both are more an affordable option than some of the higher end spotting scopes that have clear glass to see at ranges like that.

The software lets you record all the data regarding each individual target; allowing for comparisons between days at the range. You can set different profiles for different shooters so everyone can use the same program to track their shots.  The software has a mark shot button that lets you cover your shots with a colored mark on the screen so you can use a target that has a few holes already in it.

Overall Thoughts:

This system is amazing! The company is still young so I expect to see them really starting to make waves in the next few years as they grow. The long range shooting part of the industry has needed something like this for years and as the tech becomes better and better so will this system.

Walther Arms H&K MP5SD Review PT:2

Last year I came across the replica MP5SD that was made by Carl Walther of Germany and I read up on my reviews to see what others thought on the product and I saw pretty much the same thing from post to post, this was a GREAT replica and that no matter what you fed the gun it worked.

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As you can see on our Product Review page we had this gun back in 2012. Both Panzer and Gun Bunny gave a short review on how they loved the gun. I ran out of time with the gun and had to send it back to Walther before I got to write a review.  

The ammo we have found to run through the gun was:

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Federal .22 LR 40 Grains (100 rounds no misfires or jams)
Remington Thunderbolt High Velocity .22LR 40 Grains (50 rounds no misfires or jams)
Remington 22 Target Standard Velocity .22LR 40 Grains (100 rounds no misfires or jams)
Winchester Wildcat 22 .22LR HV 40 Grains (1000 rounds no misfire or jams)
Blazer 22 Long Rifle 40 Grains (50 rounds no misfires or jams)
CCI Mini Mag 22 LR 40 Grains Copper Plated round nose (100 rounds no misfires or jams)
Winchester Super X .22 LR super speed round nose (100 rounds no misfires or jams)
Remington Golden Bullet HV Plated Round nose 40 Grains (1000 rounds no misfires or jams)
Eley Target .22 LR (200 rounds no misfires or jams)

For a total of 2700 rounds. We shot over 2000 before the gun was ever cleaned.

I said that there were not misfires or problems with the ammo but I have had one operator error that I would like to note. When shooting I forget to keep my fingers out of the magazine speed loader channel which stops the follower from pushing up the rounds so it feels like a misfire. The spent brass is ejected but the bolt and follower cannot push the next round into the the chamber since my finger is stopping it. I am the only gears crew that has had this issue. 

 

Specs:

Caliber: .22 L.R.
Capacity: 10 or 25 rounds
Mode of Fire: Semi-Auto
Barrel Length: 16.2 in (412 mm)
Barrel Twist: 1 in 13-3/4 in
Rifling Grooves: 6
Rifling Length: 13.78 in (350 mm)
Front Sight: Interchangeable Posts
Rear Sight: Adjustable – Windage & Elevation
Overall Length: 26.5–32.5 in (675-825 mm)
Overall Height w/Mag:10.6 in (270 mm)
Overall Width: 2.2 in (55 mm)
Stock Style: Single Point Adjustable Telestock
Trigger Type: Single-stage
Trigger Pull: 6.6-8.8lbs
Safety Type: Manual
Principal of Operation: Blowback
Muzzle Thread: M8x.75
Length of Pull: 6.5 – 12.375 in
Sight Radius: 13.2 in (335 mm)
Diameter Rear Sight Aperture: .24 /.13 / 0.11 / 0.1 in
Front Sight Width: .07 in (1.8 mm)
Weight w/out Mag: 7.45 lbs (3400 g)
Weight of empty Mag-25: 2.5 oz (70 g)
Features:
Metal Receiver and Compensator

Safety and Magazine:

The MP5sd has a large ambidextrous safety selector.

The gun has both a magazine release button similar to the AR platform and the ambidextrous paddle release like that of an AK platform.

Suppressor:

The suppressor is just a weighted tube on the end of the gun to help mimic the weight of the real 9mm MP5SD.

Sights:

The iron sights out of the box were dead on at 50 yds. The rifle does not come with a picatinny rail for the top but you can pick one up for about $100 from HKparts.net.

Trigger:

The trigger is one of my cons for this gun. The trigger is plastic and feels like a toy. This rifle is a .22lr and with that in mind it isn’t really a problem but for the sake of a balanced and unbiased review I have to make a note of that. 

Looks:

It is a replica of the real H&K MP5SD. I like the looks and think it has a cool factor that says to everyone at the range “Yeah, I’m the bees knees”. (as to why your gun is talking to people and telling them you are the knees of a bee I have yet to figure out). All joking aside the MP5 is a very iconic gun that has been around since the mid 1960’s and has been on many peoples wish list since they first laid eyes on one.

.22 Caliber

For those of us who like the look of the real H&K MP5 (from $5,000 to $30,000), Walther has made one chambered .22LR that is more affordable to the everyday shooter.

With the gun chambered in the cheaper .22LR you can spend all day at the range without needing a bank loan for the 9mm.

.22 LR is one of my favorite rounds since I can shoot it without the recoil pains the next day or guilt that I shot 100 rounds in under 2 minutes.

Stock:

It is a single position adjustable stock meaning it is in pistol form with the stock retracted or in rifle mode with the stock at it farthest point for a length of pull around 12.3 inches.

Shooting:

There were no malfunctions outside of the operator errors which I was the only one of the crew to have.
We ran over 5000 total rounds between the two guns  (this time out and the previous review period) and both of the guns did better than expected with no malfunctions.

Price:

The MSRP is $549.99 but can typically found online for around $500.  This is a higher end .22 LR. I believe that  this is a case of you get what you pay for; quality.

Overall thoughts: 

I love this gun and in the next few months we will have a follow up review out on our 5000th round.

 

 

Review of the Aero Precision ULTRAlight scope mount

A few months ago I was contacted about doing a review on the Aero Precision ultralight scope 1” mount.

DSCN1070

This is a 6061 T6 extruded aluminum construction body with a MIL-A-Type 3 black hard-coat anodize coating. If you don’t know what that means it means it is very lightweight (2.98oz) and has a matte black hard coat finish.

This was designed for the AR platform and I had it on both the ZA-15 and the Colt LE901 chambered in the .308 and the 5.56. With my ZA-15 we sighted in at 100yds without a rail riser but when we were using the Colt we needed a riser for our Leupold VX-2 scope.

The price for this scope mount is $85 which is a great price for a higher end one-piece construction AR scope mount.

The scope mount uses Cross-slot keyways to connect the rings together rather than 4 hex screws per ring. This help with recoil protection.

DSCN1071

Overall I like this mount with how lightweight it is. I believe that this is an excellent value for the money for it being a solid mount.

The Redring® shotgun sight

RedRing

TECH DATA
Battery: AAAA 1.5V, Approx. 300 h life.
Redring® automatically shuts off after 4 hrs.
Weight: 134 g (4.726oz) excluding mounts, 192 g (6.773oz) including mounts
Length: 134 mm (5.275in), mounts included
Width: 44 mm (1.732in)
Height: 45.7 mm (1.779in)
Material: Anodized aluminum
MSRP: $899 (they have a deal going on now for $749.00)

The Redring® shotgun sight is not your typical sight with a red dot showing you where your round should hit. With a shotgun your shot will spread unless shooting a slug. With this sight you can keep both eyes open no matter which eye is dominant which improves the situational perception. The sight has built-in intelligence, called spot metering. The Redring® has an integrated processor that adjusts the brightness to the prevailing light. With a darker background it dims the ring and with it brighter, brightens the ring. It works well for hunting at all hours.

The size of the ring acts as a range-finder. The size of the ring is what the shot spread will look like at 20 meters(65 feet). It let’s the shooter know when it is safe to shoot or not so it lowers the chance of just injuring the game.

This sight dramatically increases the hit rate of what is being shot at.
The Redring® is mounted not on a rail but mounted free-floating onto the rib of the shotgun. It takes just a few minutes to mount without any changes to the gun and without messing with the balance of the shotgun. Redring® can be connected via USB to your computer and let’s you register your equipment, log personal stats, select advanced settings, and receive software updates from the manufacturer online. The Redring® has an energy-saving feature that will turn off the sight after 4 hours. The shut off time is counted down from the point the sight is turned on or from the last time the sight was intensity was manually adjusted.

What do you keep on your AR rifle?

So the question I have is this what do we keep on our rifles that we have forgotten about?

I’m sure you are sitting there thinking I have this, this and this on my rifle. what do you mean I have forgotten about something? Well what are the rail attachments that we bought and mounted to our guns because we thought we needed that micro red dot or that IR laser but 90% of the time we only hunt or shoot from the bench with our rifles so these extras don’t get used.

My Samson forend is set up for quad rails and I have two little 2” on the left and right side of the rifle near the barrel in case I wanted to mount a camera or micro red dot or a laser but more times than not I use my main scope for all of my shots and never use that laser.

Bare boned my rifle weighs in at 8 pounds but once I start adding the scope and the forward grip and a laser and my micro red dot my rifle gets heavy at 11-12+ pounds.

Do we need to periodically review what we keep on our rifles and assess what we keep on them?