Henry Repeating Arms – Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition Rifle Review

Some of you may already know I received the rank of Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America, in 2004. This is the highest rank one can receive and it must be earned and is never just given. My father was a big part as to why I made it to Eagle because he cared enough to be a part of the program and help make scouting worth what it should be. A place for boys to grown into men.

History in a Rifle

Henry Repeating Arms has been reproducing the Henry lever action since 1997 based on the 1860s rifle designed by Benjamin Tyler Henry. Henry Repeating Arms makes a very large variety of different lever action rifles all based on the original design.

Henry makes a large number of tribute edition rifles such as the BSA, the EMS, the Military and Law enforcement, just to name a few. They make 5 different “Scouting Special Edition” rifles.

 

Big Boy “Order of the Arrow Centennial Edition” (.44 mag)

Big Boy Eagle Scout Centennial Rifle (.44 Mag)

Celebrating 100 Years of Eagle Scouts

Boy Scouts of America® Centennial Edition Tribute Rifle (.22 Short/Long/LR)

Celebrate 100 years of Scouting

Special Edition Philmont Scout Ranch Rifle (.22 Short/Long/LR)

Celebrating the oldest BSA adventure camp

Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition Rifle (.22 Short/Long/LR)

Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle

Tribute Edition Rifles

While all of the scouting edition rifles are beautiful works of pure art the Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition Rifle just my hands down favorite of the 5 and why I wanted to review this particular rifle. The detail work on this rifle is incredible.

I would love to own all of Boy Scout rifle editions and keep them as a predominate display in my office  but if I could only choose one I believe I chose correctly.

Smooth Shooting

If you have never shot a Henry Lever Action Rifle there is really only one word to describe the overall feeling…. Smooth. When I first picked up this rifle and held it in my hands it felt special and different. It felt like the night I received my Eagle Scout but in a rifle. The first time I pulled the trigger I remembered the night of my Eagle board of review and when they told me I had passed. It feels special.

Honor of Owning a Henry

If you were never involved in this program I am sorry if you do not understand completely what I am talking about. I know that most people feel a different way based on the rifle and special editions they may own. Owning a Henry is like being in an exclusive club. It is that nod at the range when you see someone with one or when someone walks up to you and asks if that is a Henry and how they have always wanted one.

I am a Brotherhood member of the Order of the Arrow and I have even hiked to the top of the Tooth of Time, but I am most proud of my Eagle Scout. I would not be the man I am today if it wasn’t for my time spent in the program. I am honored to have a such a special fire arm to honor that moment in my life.

Eagle Scout or Scout Master Gifts

I have to take a moment a say that this would be hands down be the best Eagle Scout gift to give a scout who enjoys shooting. A Henry Boy Scout edition would also be a great way to honor an outstanding Boy Scout Leader, Scout Master or Eagle Advisor. If you have a hero returning home from overseas who enjoys shooting, any Henry rifle would make an awesome welcome home gift. I am pretty sure you can look and see what other Henry gifts are perfect for the special men and women in your life.

Specifications

Eagle Scout Tribute Edition

Model Number: H004ES
Action Type: Lever Action
Caliber: .22 S/L/LR
Capacity: 16 rounds .22 LR 21 rounds .22 Short
Length: 38.5″
Barrel Length: 20″
Weight: 6.75 lbs.
Stock: American Walnut
Sights: Marbles fully adjustable Semi-Buckhorn rear, with reversible white diamond insert and brass beaded front sight
Finish: Brasslite receiver, brass buttplate and blued barrel and and metal barrel band
M.S.R.P.: $1,095.00

The Pedersen Device–1903 Springfield

I typically don’t do articles about historical firearms because my knowledge on most of the subjects would not make for good info. I saw this video and since our family owns a 1903 it is something that is close to my heart. My father was given our 1903 rifle by my late grandfather.

The 1903 is an old sporterized Rock Island Armory 1903 A3 that has been used a deer rifle for years. I love the rifle as it is very accurate and just a great .30-06 rifle.

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This image found on the http://www.nramuseum.org. shows the similarity to a the modern AR-15 5.56 to .22lr conversion kits in how the bolt has a “shell” to extend into the barrel giving the converted caliber a new chamber.

The cartridge used was a .30-18 auto.

Winchester back at it with the 1911 .45acp

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Phil over at Thefirearmblog.com  showing off the new wooden box of Winchester “1911 .45 ACP”.

I published the Press release about the new line of Winchester ammo a few months back. I think Winchester is doing well by branding it with the WIN 1911.  I still hear from people less familiar with firearms, telling me they need to go buy 1911 rounds or AR rounds like somehow that means something with so many variants chambered in different calibers. Yes, there are plenty of reasons to assume that the firearm in question is its standard caliber, but I met a gentlemen out at the range one day who was very new to firearms and was very excited to shoot his new 1911 and when he went to load the rounds the bullets were too big, He had purchased a 9mm 1911 and when we went into the store he asked for 1911 ammo and was sold 5 boxes of .45acp.

Phil talks about it being a nice Christmas gift and I can see that, however at $140 for the kit I don’t see that the wooden box is worth $60 (based on a $20 50 round  box of .45acp). I like the box and it would be nice to look at, but the ammo inside is overly pricy for my taste.

If you would like to see more pictures check out Thefirearmblog.com

Reblog: Gun Review: CMMG Mk9 Pistol/Upper Group, 9mm PDW

A friend of the GEARs Crew has been interested in ARs chambered pistol calibers and I thought this review posted over at Thefirearmblog.com was worth the read.

 

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Specifications:

The Mk9 upper is made of forged 7075-T6 aluminum, and is chambered in 9mm, with a 9″ barrel made of nitrided 4140 chrome-moly steel in a 1:10″ twist.  It is a simple, pure blowback operating system. Those who plan to use suppressors or muzzle devices on the Mk9 should be advised that the barrel is threaded in 1/2″-36 – this is the case with almost all 9mm AR-style carbines, perhaps due to the significant risk that a user might accidentally install a .223 muzzle device with 1/2″x28 threads onto a 9mm upper, which could be dangerous. Accordingly, if you plan to use a suppressor, you may have to obtain a thread adapter (I recommend a 1/2″x36 to tri-lug adapter, if you can locate it) or get a new piston/sleeve for your suppressor if it has interchangeable pistons (and be sure to install a fixed barrel adapter if your suppressor has a Nielsen device).

See more here

Walther IWI UZI Rifle .22lr Review

I am a big fan of the replica .22lr firearms that Walther produces. I have been since I first shot the H&K MP5SD .22lr back in 2013.
I have shot other replicas and I can tell you Walther makes the highest quality .22 replicas.  They just cannot be matched in my opinion.

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Specs

Caliber: .22 Long Rifle
Mag Capacity: 10, 20 rounds
Weight w/out Mag: 7.5 lbs..
Overall Length: 26.1 – 33.3 in
Barrel Length: 16.1 in
Barrel Twist: 1 in 13-3/4 in
Grooves: 6
Operation: Blowback

The Rifle

Using IWI specs, Walther manufacturers  the .22lr firearms to mimic the weight and feel of the firearms they are based on. This gives the gun a realistic feel and look that keeps the gun from feeling like a toy.  It insures, that even if you put them to the test and run them dirty like we do, they will still function.

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The Misfire

In the Gears of Guns armory we try to stock as many off the shelf .22lr rounds as we can.  That way, when testing, we can find out what the guns like and dislike.

During our last trip to the range we found a box that was labeled “Winchester .22lr Copper Plated.” We figured the rounds are about 15 years old. I loaded a full mag of the ammo and found I was getting about every third round to be a misfire, full primer strike without ignition. Since we didn’t have the problem with any other rounds, I chalk that up to age of the round and not the firearm itself.

The Looks

The first day I had this rifle at the range I walked into the office to talk with the owner of TDSA and show him the new test gun. Before I had the chance to explain what I had, he was in complete shock. He thought what I had was an IWI 9mm UZI SMG with suppressor. In reality, I was holding the .22 replica.

If you are looking to own a rifle that looks like the real thing, it is hard to go wrong with the Walther UZI rifle.

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Accuracy

Out of the box the rifle was dead on at 25yd. Since we reviewed this rifle as a plinker we never tested it beyond 25yds.

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Price

The MSRP is $599.00. which might seem steep for a .22lr Plinker rifle but with how well built Walther makes their .22lr firearms you are paying for quality.

Overall Thoughts

This is an UZI chambered in .22lr. Plain and simple. The gun looks and feels real, it shoots with nail driving accuracy at 25 yards. This is a wonderful firearm to add to any collection.

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POLL – How often do you train with your conceal carry pistol?

 

Written for Ammoforsale.com – Which caliber is best?

For the full Ammoforsale.com article click here

(Atticus James) I was asked which caliber I think is best out of the 9mm, .40 S&W and the .45 ACP.

This is not an easy question for me to just flat out say one is better than the other as I own and love all three calibers. Sure the 9mm is cheap to shoot and has low felt recoil so it is fun for most all shooters. The .45 acp has that manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feel. The .40 S&W is a middle of the road round as it was designed to have as much of the best of both the 9mm and the .45 acp.

Before I get to what I feel is the best of the three calibers I would like to give my view points on all three

.45 ACP Review

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The first caliber of the three I ever owned was a Glock 21 chambered in the .45 acp and I have shot so many rounds of .45 acp  that I am very comfortable with the weight and felt recoil.

When I think of the .45acp I think of the Colt 1911 as they are both very iconic together.

Just some of my thoughts on the .45 acp

· In the middle of the cost range between the .40 and 9mm

· Heavy on the felt recoil. After firing the first shot your arms may move so much that it will take longer to get back on target for the follow up shot.

· The ammo is very common and when not in an ammo shortage very easy to find the ammo at competitive prices.

· An all around good caliber to carry as a secondary when hunting.

· Not all shooters are comfortable with the size and felt recoil of the .45.

The sizes of a lot of .45 handguns are large so they are not as easy to conceal. Not that there are not small frame .45s but when you are shooting a .45 you want to have as much grip on that firearm as possible.

9mm Review

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The 9mm is a good all around caliber. The round is not a clear winner to me in any one category so I believe the round should be looked at overall rather than broken down.

The round can have improved ballistics in some categories with a change in bullet weight or bullet type (ball to Hollow-point) depending on what your end goal for the round is.

When moving up in the caliber world from .22lr, one of the next steps to the general shooter might be to the 9mm.

· The ammo (Target or non defensive rounds) tends to be less expensive than the .40 or .45.

· The small round generally means less felt recoil (means better follow up shots)

· The market is flooded with different brands and models of 9mm so the average handgun is not going to be as expensive.

· More rounds can fit into a magazine.

.40 S&W Review

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As I said before, this round was designed with the thought of trying to take the best of the 9mm and the .45 acp and build a new round altogether.

The .40 S&W has become one of the more popular conceal carry rounds only surpassed by the 9mm (in a recent poll conducted buy gearsofguns.com) and followed by the .45 ACP.

Even with the popularity the .40 it is still the most expensive (per factory) round of the three.

· Slightly lower to equal to the 9mm when looking at magazine capacity

· Similar ballistics of the .45

· Less felt recoil than the .45

· Larger round (to the 9mm) means bigger hole.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, when people compare the 9mm to the .40 to the .45 acp they are comparing gun to gun to gun vs. ammo to ammo to ammo. When you factor out the gun and solely look at the ammo your opinion may change based on the type of shooting you plan to use the ammo for.

I love that the 9mm is inexpensive to shoot and still has felt recoil (unlike the .22lr)

I love the .45 ACP because of the manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feeling.

And I love the popularity and ballistics of the .40 S&W.

Written by Atticus James
Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Gearsofguns.com

About GearsofGuns:
Gears of Guns is a gun blog dedicated to bring information about everything in the Firearm industry. Gears of Guns strives to post the newest guns and latest gun related info we can. We personally try and test as many guns and products as we can. We talk to manufacturer’s representatives and ask the questions that you want answered. We spend many hours researching the information that we present here on the Gears of Guns blog so that you know that the information is true, tried and trustworthy. Visit: www.gearsofguns.com

Name this gun: BCM Europearms CM4 Storm

 

SPECS:

Calibers available: 9mm Luger, 9×21 IMI, .40 S&W
Barrel Length : 6.8inches including muzzle device (175mm)
Overall length: 15.5 inches (395mm)
Weight: 5.2 Pounds (2400g)

Versions available:
CM4 (Carbine)
PM4 (Pistol)

The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm semi-automatic carbine is designed in Italy and has its roots based in the Spectre M4 which was developed by the Italian company SITES in 1980s. This firearm was designed by the same people who designed the Spectre M4 (seen below).

1-italian-spectre-m4-submachine-gun-andrew-chittock
SITES (Società Italiana Tecnologie Speciali S.p.A.) Spectre M4

The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm was designed for the civilian and security markets. The availability outside of Italy is unclear to Gearsofguns.com at this time.

The platform does not have a manual safety since the firearm uses its own proprietary  SA/DA trigger group. The first trigger pull will always be double action only and each subsequent trigger pull will be single action similar to that of a revolvers SA/DA trigger.

MSRP for the pistol is 1200 euro and 1400 euro for the carbine. 

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