Video Tuesday!!! Vltor: The True Stock Options

Today we look at 6 Vltor stocks in Black, FDE/Tan and Foliage Green. Vltor sent the IMOD and the EMOD stocks for us to test on the #WindhamProject.

I love the fact that the EMOD stock has the battery compartment for my CR123s. 

The IMOD stock is smaller so it has less of a foot print in your safe or hard case but still has the beastliness of the EMOD to handle anything you throw at them.  

The #WindhamProject is a Windham Weaponry RMCS-4 AR which is chamber in 5.56, .300BLK, 7.62x39mm, 9mm and .22lr. We have grabbed some of the most awesome parts of the gun industry to help us better customize this rifle and show you how to can turn this rifle from something awesome to something EPIC and drool worthy at the range.

Vltor EMOD and IMOD Stocks in Tan

The November Glocktoberfest Review

A Glock 30 Short Frame Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

I like the idea of not trying to be in the first wave of bloggers to review a firearm. I prefer to wait a year after a product comes out to review it because it means I have a chance to request to spend more time with a firearm. That way I get to know it more mindfully without worrying about the other reviewers waiting in the long line to test a firearm out.

I own a few Glocks and my favorite of all of them is my Gen 2 G21 .45ACP 13 round pistol. I requested the Glock 30SF for review about 5 months back, after seeing it at SHOT Show 2014. I have always been someone who loves the .45ACP over just about any other pistol cartridge, because of the size of the round.

GLOCK 30SF

I like knowing I have the power and punch that comes with the .45ACP cartridge. The old saying about carry a bigger stick comes to mind. I do not believe that this love of the .45acp  affects or deters my abilities to do my job when looking at different calibers with an objective view point. Let’s face it, they are all fun to shoot.

Glock 30SF Specs

Caliber: .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol)
Length: 6.88”
Width: 1.27”
Height: 4.80”
Barrel Length: 3.77”
Trigger Pull: 5.5 pounds
Mag Capacity: 10 rounds (standard) 13 Rounds (using Glock 21 mags)

Shooting

As I said, I requested more time with this gun to get 1 or 2 more rounds down range. This brought my round count to around 2500 rounds of ball and jacketed hollow points. I never holstered this pistol, as I use a large frame drop leg holster at the range.

When I first pulled the Glock 30 SF out of the box, the empty mags wouldn’t drop freely. I loaded the mags with 10 rounds each and fired all 20 rounds. After that, they had no problem falling free when I hit the mag release.

The Size

My groupings were better when I was running my Glock 21 mags out of the pistol because I had more real estate to grip the gun with allowing for better control. The 10 round mags just barely allowed for my pinky to be on the gun, not giving me as tight of a grip. The difference was a stray round left or right after shooting a few mags.

GLOCK SF

Cleanings

Normally I don’t worry about keeping review guns clean after every range trip. I like to see how they handle and if they slow down as they get dirtier. I didn’t do that with the Glock 30SF because I didn’t feel there was a need to test something that had been shown for years that even dirty, they work.

I cleaned the gun after every range day and the most rounds put through it at any one time was 800 rounds of Federal American Eagle Pistol .45 ACP 230 Grain FMJ which in my opinion is decently “clean” ammo compared to the Wolf and Tula Steel case. There was just really no good reason to torture test this pistol. When I opened it up, I saw exactly what I expected.

Ammo Used

One thing I have always noted with Glock is that they typically will shoot any brand or ammo type I run through them. I tested a box of brand new Tula steel case. After 5 light primer strikes without any ignition I switched the ammo to my 1911 and didn’t have any problems with the ammo. I have seen this problem before using the Wolf barrel on my Glock 21. However, when using the factory barrel, this was never an issue. I believe this was caused by the Tula primers being seated deeper than spec.

The brands I used:

· Federal (230 Grain ball)

· Wolf Polyformance (230 Grain ball)

· HPR JHP (230 Grain Jacketed hollow point)

· Monarch Brass (230 Grain ball)

· Monarch Steel (230 Grain ball)

· CCI Blazer Aluminum (230 Grain ball)

· Monarch Brass (185 Grain JHP)

· And a few other brands from people who shot the gun with ammo they brought.

In The Box

1 Glock 30SF
2 10 Round Factory Mags
2 Spent brass from the proofing department at Glock
1 “speed” Loader
1 .45 caliber nylon bore brush
1 Plastic Cleaning rod
Paperwork
1 cable lock

The “Speed” Loader

The speed loader they ship is a good thought, in theory, but in my hands it was slow and frustrating to use.  I was always faster hand loading each mag than using the speed loader provided.

Speed Loader

When trying to load the .45s into the magazine you still have to push the previous round down as the loader doesn’t offer enough room for the brass to slide in. The efforts are almost that of hand loading the mag without the use of your thumb on the round. This seems like more procedure and steps to just load one round.  

I do own a Maglula for pistols I found that I was faster using that then by hand.  The speed loader isn’t bad; it just did not work well for me. A few of the other crew members had better luck with it. Everyone did agree, in the end that the Maglula was the fastest.

My Sister and the .45

After getting out of college, my father and I figured if my sister was going to be living alone she needed a pistol to keep at her place. My sister has grown up around guns. She enjoys shooting with me every now and then.

She likes my Glock 21 and is a fairly decent shot with it. I did not want to part with my Glock 21. When I heard one of my friends was selling his Glock 22, I jumped on it and picked it up for a really great price.  I thought about giving it to her, but I just like it too much.

My sister has always lived within a 40 minute drive from my folks so we were never worried about her. Recently she has been looking for another job outside of the state. She has also been expressing more and more interest in getting her conceal carry.

I looked at a few pistols for her but it always came back to wanting the .45acp. I view conceal carry pistols as something you should WANT to shoot. If you enjoy shooting it, you are more likely to train more with it than something you just carry because you were told to.

I have taken her to the range with us a number of times to get some trigger time with this pistol and her comment is always the same “so this is my new gun right”?  “You are letting me keep this one because it fits me and I like it”

For Christmas I have ordered a Glock 30SF for her but now I am sitting here wishing I had ordered one for myself. You just can’t have too many guns, right???

Light Rail

The Glock 30SF has a rail for a light or laser mount. I don’t currently own any pistol lights or lasers due in part to the fact that I haven’t found one that has sparked my interest yet. I honestly haven’t looked that hard either. I am always open to recommendations.

The Recoil

I would equate the recoil to that of the larger Glock 21. This surprised me the first time I shot it as I was expecting a little harsher recoil. Later, I put one in each hand (the 21 and the 30SF) and I could feel that were pretty close to the same weight.  I guess I should not have been surprised.

Conceal Carry Note

At this time in my life I do not conceal carry. 90% of the time I leave the house, the place I am going will not allow me to enter with a pistol. This makes for a tough choice for me, do I carry in my truck and risk someone breaking into the truck because it is older or do I leave my gun at home and just pray I am never in a place where I need it?  I tend to keep my gun at home. One of the crew members is a police officer and I am normally within arm’s length of him. On top of that I live in a good area with very low crime.

Accuracy

I want to tell you that my shot groups looked like I only hit the target with one round. The truth is, even if the gun was that accurate I am not that skillful. The subcompact design is not meant for competition shooters, it is meant for conceal carry. In a conceal carry situation you are not going to try and engage the target at 300 yards like you see in the movies. This pistol, for me, was just as accurate as any of my other Glocks. I can hit a man size silhouette at 50 yards.

Glock 21 Mag

Final Thoughts

I have been a fan of Glocks’ for years (I know, you couldn’t tell). The subcompact Glock 30 SF is just another in a long line of quality pistols they are known for. While picking up this pistol from my FFL I was asked if I wanted to purchase their Glock 43 Single Stack 9mm. My only comment was, why mess with 9mm when you can have the power of a .45acp?

I wish I could get more range time with this pistol just because it is fun to shoot. If you get the chance to send some lead down range running this pistol I highly recommend it.

Gift Giving Suggestions

As said earlier in this article, I will be gifting this gun to my sister. That being said, she has shot many different calibers and pistols. She knows how to handle her firearm and herself. She knows she prefers Glocks. This was an easy choice for me.

As it is getting closer to the holiday season I would like to add this word of advice to anyone thinking about buying any pistol as a gift. If the person you are purchasing for owns a lot of firearms as it is and you know for fact they are comfortable with different pistols, go for it. If not, please think about taking them to a store and seeing if they like the pistol first.

I have seen too many couples at the range, where the guy bought a pistol for his significant other without letting her size the gun up first. I see them getting into situations that makes everyone uncomfortable. It can occasionally put them and others in harm’s way since they cannot handle the firearm yet. 

Buying a caliber that someone is not comfortable with shooting yet can cause people to be turned off by shooting. It can even cause them to mishandle the firearm and put themselves and other people in a dangerous situation.

Introducing someone to a firearm first is always the safer bet so they get a chance to have some hands on time. They can say whether they like the weight and if they like how the gun shoots. I know you are not always able to test first a gun before you buy it, but it is worth renting that caliber firearm first. I strongly recommend letting the gift receiver try it out at the range to see how they respond. This is always a smart idea. Firearms make a wonderful gift, just make sure it’s a wonderful experience.

Steel

    Otis Technology Elite Cleaning System Review

    I have this weird need to collect cleaning kits. It isn’t because I need 7 identical  12 gauge brushes or because I am lacking in the cleaning rod or cleaning cable department. It seems everyone has their own take on what a shooter needs to help them achieve the best clean possible and I like to see what the differences are. Most companies send out their version of oil and cleaner or even just CLP. However, so far, as much as I am willing to try new types of cleaners or CLPs I do favor my M-Pro7 32oz spray for cleaning.

     FG-1000_facing_left_Large_Multi-Large

    Specs

    – Over 40 firearm-specific cleaning components in a nylon case
    – Six (6) Memory-Flex® Cables of varying length for effective and correct Breech-to-Muzzle® cleaning
    – Twenty-two (22) bronze bore brushes to remove copper deposits and other fouling
    – Obstruction removal tools for jammed cases and other blockages
    – Specialized precision tools for complete breakdown and fine cleaning of all critical and hard to reach areas of your firearm
    – Optics cleaning gear for care and maintenance of scopes, rangefinders and more
    – Removable Tactical Cleaning System (Item # FG-750) for convenient carrying in the field
    – Dimensions: 15 1/4″ x 8 3/4″ x 4 1/2″

    The Brushes

    As you can see in the picture above the main kit comes 14 different caliber brushes for just about every caliber you might need.

    1. 22 (.204 thru .222)
    2. 25 (.223 thru 6.5)
    3. 27 (.270 thru 7mm)
    4. 30 (.30 thru 8mm)
    5. 35 (.338 thru .357)
    6. 38 (.370 thru 9.3mm)
    7. 40 (.40 thru 10.75mm)
    8. 45 (.44 thru .458)
    9. 50 .50 thru 12.9mm)
    10. .410 GA Shotgun
    11. 28 GA Shotgun
    12. 20 GA Shotgun
    13. 16 GA Shotgun
    14. 12/10 GA Shotgun (
    15. .17 caliber short brush (rifle/pistol/air rifle)
    16. .22 caliber Short brush (rifle/pistol/air rifle)

    The other six brushes are found in the removable tactical cleaning system

    For me, this means I can clean all of my firearms and my friends and family can use this kit to clean theirs too.

    Other brushes:  It comes with a nylon brush that I like to use in addition to gun cleaning as my travel tooth brush and beard comb. I have found that a hit of rem oil really gets the teeth pearly white and the beard soft and shiny (No!  Seriously,  I promise I am NOT stupid enough to believe that I can use gun cleaning gear to brush my teeth or comb my beard! Just joking! You will harm yourself if you try this).

    The Other Nougaty Stuff and Things

    Otis ships this kit with carbon scrapers, 3 tubes of CLP, lens cleaners, patches for all calibers, cleaning parts for air guns and even a chamber brush for your ARs.

    This kit doesn’t come with a brass cleaning rod but rather cleaning cables.  I admit to having days I like them and days I don’t.

    Removable Tactical Cleaning System

    – 8″, 30″ and 34″ Memory-Flex® Cables for effective and correct Breech-to-Muzzle® cleaning
    – Six (6) firearm-specific bronze bore brushes to remove copper deposits and other fouling
    – Lightweight soft pack case with belt loop for convenient carrying
    – T-handle and obstruction removal tools for jammed cases and other blockages
    – Redesigned component holder secures and protects brushes and components
    – Dimensions: 4″ x 4″ x 2 1/2″

    The 6 brushes that come with this kit are 12/10 Gauge, .22 cal, .27 cal, .45, .38, and .30.

    I think I would rather is be a MOLLE pouch but I am sure there is a good reason it isn’t. (I’ll ask at SHOT 2016)

    Overall Thoughts 

    The Otis Technology Elite Cleaning System retails for $99 Amazon. This kit is really nice in the brush department but I would have liked to have seen their AR BCM cleaning tool they call the B.O.N.E.® TOOL. They make them for both 5.56 and 7.62 bolts.

    As I said earlier, I use this with M-Pro 7 cleaner and oil because I find it works best for me.

    The Otis Technology Elite Cleaning System is great if you are looking for an all caliber in one kit. Everyone with more than one caliber collection should have one. This kits is a must for collectors, gun ranges, firearm instructors, etc.

    If you are someone who stays in the 3 or 4 caliber range ( 9mm, .45, .22 and .30 caliber or what ever it might be) this kit might be overkill but if you know you are going to be branching out and getting into the revolver or big bore game or even just into the Shotgun game this kits is GREAT!

    My only two comments, or wish list about what I would like to see changed or added is the BONE tool and the removable kit upgraded to MOLLE.

    Henry Repeating Arms – Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition Rifle Review

    Some of you may already know I received the rank of Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts of America, in 2004. This is the highest rank one can receive and it must be earned and is never just given. My father was a big part as to why I made it to Eagle because he cared enough to be a part of the program and help make scouting worth what it should be. A place for boys to grown into men.

    History in a Rifle

    Henry Repeating Arms has been reproducing the Henry lever action since 1997 based on the 1860s rifle designed by Benjamin Tyler Henry. Henry Repeating Arms makes a very large variety of different lever action rifles all based on the original design.

    Henry makes a large number of tribute edition rifles such as the BSA, the EMS, the Military and Law enforcement, just to name a few. They make 5 different “Scouting Special Edition” rifles.

     

    Big Boy “Order of the Arrow Centennial Edition” (.44 mag)

    Big Boy Eagle Scout Centennial Rifle (.44 Mag)

    Celebrating 100 Years of Eagle Scouts

    Boy Scouts of America® Centennial Edition Tribute Rifle (.22 Short/Long/LR)

    Celebrate 100 years of Scouting

    Special Edition Philmont Scout Ranch Rifle (.22 Short/Long/LR)

    Celebrating the oldest BSA adventure camp

    Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition Rifle (.22 Short/Long/LR)

    Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle

    Tribute Edition Rifles

    While all of the scouting edition rifles are beautiful works of pure art the Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition Rifle just my hands down favorite of the 5 and why I wanted to review this particular rifle. The detail work on this rifle is incredible.

    I would love to own all of Boy Scout rifle editions and keep them as a predominate display in my office  but if I could only choose one I believe I chose correctly.

    Smooth Shooting

    If you have never shot a Henry Lever Action Rifle there is really only one word to describe the overall feeling…. Smooth. When I first picked up this rifle and held it in my hands it felt special and different. It felt like the night I received my Eagle Scout but in a rifle. The first time I pulled the trigger I remembered the night of my Eagle board of review and when they told me I had passed. It feels special.

    Honor of Owning a Henry

    If you were never involved in this program I am sorry if you do not understand completely what I am talking about. I know that most people feel a different way based on the rifle and special editions they may own. Owning a Henry is like being in an exclusive club. It is that nod at the range when you see someone with one or when someone walks up to you and asks if that is a Henry and how they have always wanted one.

    I am a Brotherhood member of the Order of the Arrow and I have even hiked to the top of the Tooth of Time, but I am most proud of my Eagle Scout. I would not be the man I am today if it wasn’t for my time spent in the program. I am honored to have a such a special fire arm to honor that moment in my life.

    Eagle Scout or Scout Master Gifts

    I have to take a moment a say that this would be hands down be the best Eagle Scout gift to give a scout who enjoys shooting. A Henry Boy Scout edition would also be a great way to honor an outstanding Boy Scout Leader, Scout Master or Eagle Advisor. If you have a hero returning home from overseas who enjoys shooting, any Henry rifle would make an awesome welcome home gift. I am pretty sure you can look and see what other Henry gifts are perfect for the special men and women in your life.

    Specifications

    Eagle Scout Tribute Edition

    Model Number: H004ES
    Action Type: Lever Action
    Caliber: .22 S/L/LR
    Capacity: 16 rounds .22 LR 21 rounds .22 Short
    Length: 38.5″
    Barrel Length: 20″
    Weight: 6.75 lbs.
    Stock: American Walnut
    Sights: Marbles fully adjustable Semi-Buckhorn rear, with reversible white diamond insert and brass beaded front sight
    Finish: Brasslite receiver, brass buttplate and blued barrel and and metal barrel band
    M.S.R.P.: $1,095.00

    The Pedersen Device–1903 Springfield

    I typically don’t do articles about historical firearms because my knowledge on most of the subjects would not make for good info. I saw this video and since our family owns a 1903 it is something that is close to my heart. My father was given our 1903 rifle by my late grandfather.

    The 1903 is an old sporterized Rock Island Armory 1903 A3 that has been used a deer rifle for years. I love the rifle as it is very accurate and just a great .30-06 rifle.

    B57-03-33_thumb.jpg

    This image found on the http://www.nramuseum.org. shows the similarity to a the modern AR-15 5.56 to .22lr conversion kits in how the bolt has a “shell” to extend into the barrel giving the converted caliber a new chamber.

    The cartridge used was a .30-18 auto.

    Winchester back at it with the 1911 .45acp

    BF-Win1911.5

    Phil over at Thefirearmblog.com  showing off the new wooden box of Winchester “1911 .45 ACP”.

    I published the Press release about the new line of Winchester ammo a few months back. I think Winchester is doing well by branding it with the WIN 1911.  I still hear from people less familiar with firearms, telling me they need to go buy 1911 rounds or AR rounds like somehow that means something with so many variants chambered in different calibers. Yes, there are plenty of reasons to assume that the firearm in question is its standard caliber, but I met a gentlemen out at the range one day who was very new to firearms and was very excited to shoot his new 1911 and when he went to load the rounds the bullets were too big, He had purchased a 9mm 1911 and when we went into the store he asked for 1911 ammo and was sold 5 boxes of .45acp.

    Phil talks about it being a nice Christmas gift and I can see that, however at $140 for the kit I don’t see that the wooden box is worth $60 (based on a $20 50 round  box of .45acp). I like the box and it would be nice to look at, but the ammo inside is overly pricy for my taste.

    If you would like to see more pictures check out Thefirearmblog.com

    Reblog: Gun Review: CMMG Mk9 Pistol/Upper Group, 9mm PDW

    A friend of the GEARs Crew has been interested in ARs chambered pistol calibers and I thought this review posted over at Thefirearmblog.com was worth the read.

     

    Wordpress

    Specifications:

    The Mk9 upper is made of forged 7075-T6 aluminum, and is chambered in 9mm, with a 9″ barrel made of nitrided 4140 chrome-moly steel in a 1:10″ twist.  It is a simple, pure blowback operating system. Those who plan to use suppressors or muzzle devices on the Mk9 should be advised that the barrel is threaded in 1/2″-36 – this is the case with almost all 9mm AR-style carbines, perhaps due to the significant risk that a user might accidentally install a .223 muzzle device with 1/2″x28 threads onto a 9mm upper, which could be dangerous. Accordingly, if you plan to use a suppressor, you may have to obtain a thread adapter (I recommend a 1/2″x36 to tri-lug adapter, if you can locate it) or get a new piston/sleeve for your suppressor if it has interchangeable pistons (and be sure to install a fixed barrel adapter if your suppressor has a Nielsen device).

    See more here

    Walther IWI UZI Rifle .22lr Review

    I am a big fan of the replica .22lr firearms that Walther produces. I have been since I first shot the H&K MP5SD .22lr back in 2013.
    I have shot other replicas and I can tell you Walther makes the highest quality .22 replicas.  They just cannot be matched in my opinion.

    DSCN3135

    Specs

    Caliber: .22 Long Rifle
    Mag Capacity: 10, 20 rounds
    Weight w/out Mag: 7.5 lbs..
    Overall Length: 26.1 – 33.3 in
    Barrel Length: 16.1 in
    Barrel Twist: 1 in 13-3/4 in
    Grooves: 6
    Operation: Blowback

    The Rifle

    Using IWI specs, Walther manufacturers  the .22lr firearms to mimic the weight and feel of the firearms they are based on. This gives the gun a realistic feel and look that keeps the gun from feeling like a toy.  It insures, that even if you put them to the test and run them dirty like we do, they will still function.

    DSCN3137

    The Misfire

    In the Gears of Guns armory we try to stock as many off the shelf .22lr rounds as we can.  That way, when testing, we can find out what the guns like and dislike.

    During our last trip to the range we found a box that was labeled “Winchester .22lr Copper Plated.” We figured the rounds are about 15 years old. I loaded a full mag of the ammo and found I was getting about every third round to be a misfire, full primer strike without ignition. Since we didn’t have the problem with any other rounds, I chalk that up to age of the round and not the firearm itself.

    The Looks

    The first day I had this rifle at the range I walked into the office to talk with the owner of TDSA and show him the new test gun. Before I had the chance to explain what I had, he was in complete shock. He thought what I had was an IWI 9mm UZI SMG with suppressor. In reality, I was holding the .22 replica.

    If you are looking to own a rifle that looks like the real thing, it is hard to go wrong with the Walther UZI rifle.

    DSCN3136

    Accuracy

    Out of the box the rifle was dead on at 25yd. Since we reviewed this rifle as a plinker we never tested it beyond 25yds.

    DSCN3139

    Price

    The MSRP is $599.00. which might seem steep for a .22lr Plinker rifle but with how well built Walther makes their .22lr firearms you are paying for quality.

    Overall Thoughts

    This is an UZI chambered in .22lr. Plain and simple. The gun looks and feels real, it shoots with nail driving accuracy at 25 yards. This is a wonderful firearm to add to any collection.

     DSCN3146

    POLL – How often do you train with your conceal carry pistol?

     

    Written for Ammoforsale.com – Which caliber is best?

    For the full Ammoforsale.com article click here

    (Atticus James) I was asked which caliber I think is best out of the 9mm, .40 S&W and the .45 ACP.

    This is not an easy question for me to just flat out say one is better than the other as I own and love all three calibers. Sure the 9mm is cheap to shoot and has low felt recoil so it is fun for most all shooters. The .45 acp has that manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feel. The .40 S&W is a middle of the road round as it was designed to have as much of the best of both the 9mm and the .45 acp.

    Before I get to what I feel is the best of the three calibers I would like to give my view points on all three

    .45 ACP Review

    clip_image002

    The first caliber of the three I ever owned was a Glock 21 chambered in the .45 acp and I have shot so many rounds of .45 acp  that I am very comfortable with the weight and felt recoil.

    When I think of the .45acp I think of the Colt 1911 as they are both very iconic together.

    Just some of my thoughts on the .45 acp

    · In the middle of the cost range between the .40 and 9mm

    · Heavy on the felt recoil. After firing the first shot your arms may move so much that it will take longer to get back on target for the follow up shot.

    · The ammo is very common and when not in an ammo shortage very easy to find the ammo at competitive prices.

    · An all around good caliber to carry as a secondary when hunting.

    · Not all shooters are comfortable with the size and felt recoil of the .45.

    The sizes of a lot of .45 handguns are large so they are not as easy to conceal. Not that there are not small frame .45s but when you are shooting a .45 you want to have as much grip on that firearm as possible.

    9mm Review

    clip_image004

    The 9mm is a good all around caliber. The round is not a clear winner to me in any one category so I believe the round should be looked at overall rather than broken down.

    The round can have improved ballistics in some categories with a change in bullet weight or bullet type (ball to Hollow-point) depending on what your end goal for the round is.

    When moving up in the caliber world from .22lr, one of the next steps to the general shooter might be to the 9mm.

    · The ammo (Target or non defensive rounds) tends to be less expensive than the .40 or .45.

    · The small round generally means less felt recoil (means better follow up shots)

    · The market is flooded with different brands and models of 9mm so the average handgun is not going to be as expensive.

    · More rounds can fit into a magazine.

    .40 S&W Review

    clip_image006

    As I said before, this round was designed with the thought of trying to take the best of the 9mm and the .45 acp and build a new round altogether.

    The .40 S&W has become one of the more popular conceal carry rounds only surpassed by the 9mm (in a recent poll conducted buy gearsofguns.com) and followed by the .45 ACP.

    Even with the popularity the .40 it is still the most expensive (per factory) round of the three.

    · Slightly lower to equal to the 9mm when looking at magazine capacity

    · Similar ballistics of the .45

    · Less felt recoil than the .45

    · Larger round (to the 9mm) means bigger hole.

    Conclusion

    Generally speaking, when people compare the 9mm to the .40 to the .45 acp they are comparing gun to gun to gun vs. ammo to ammo to ammo. When you factor out the gun and solely look at the ammo your opinion may change based on the type of shooting you plan to use the ammo for.

    I love that the 9mm is inexpensive to shoot and still has felt recoil (unlike the .22lr)

    I love the .45 ACP because of the manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feeling.

    And I love the popularity and ballistics of the .40 S&W.

    Written by Atticus James
    Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Gearsofguns.com

    About GearsofGuns:
    Gears of Guns is a gun blog dedicated to bring information about everything in the Firearm industry. Gears of Guns strives to post the newest guns and latest gun related info we can. We personally try and test as many guns and products as we can. We talk to manufacturer’s representatives and ask the questions that you want answered. We spend many hours researching the information that we present here on the Gears of Guns blog so that you know that the information is true, tried and trustworthy. Visit: www.gearsofguns.com

    Name this gun: BCM Europearms CM4 Storm

     

    SPECS:

    Calibers available: 9mm Luger, 9×21 IMI, .40 S&W
    Barrel Length : 6.8inches including muzzle device (175mm)
    Overall length: 15.5 inches (395mm)
    Weight: 5.2 Pounds (2400g)

    Versions available:
    CM4 (Carbine)
    PM4 (Pistol)

    The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm semi-automatic carbine is designed in Italy and has its roots based in the Spectre M4 which was developed by the Italian company SITES in 1980s. This firearm was designed by the same people who designed the Spectre M4 (seen below).

    1-italian-spectre-m4-submachine-gun-andrew-chittock
    SITES (Società Italiana Tecnologie Speciali S.p.A.) Spectre M4

    The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm was designed for the civilian and security markets. The availability outside of Italy is unclear to Gearsofguns.com at this time.

    The platform does not have a manual safety since the firearm uses its own proprietary  SA/DA trigger group. The first trigger pull will always be double action only and each subsequent trigger pull will be single action similar to that of a revolvers SA/DA trigger.

    MSRP for the pistol is 1200 euro and 1400 euro for the carbine. 

    1085336_1000