Winchester back at it with the 1911 .45acp

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Phil over at Thefirearmblog.com  showing off the new wooden box of Winchester “1911 .45 ACP”.

I published the Press release about the new line of Winchester ammo a few months back. I think Winchester is doing well by branding it with the WIN 1911.  I still hear from people less familiar with firearms, telling me they need to go buy 1911 rounds or AR rounds like somehow that means something with so many variants chambered in different calibers. Yes, there are plenty of reasons to assume that the firearm in question is its standard caliber, but I met a gentlemen out at the range one day who was very new to firearms and was very excited to shoot his new 1911 and when he went to load the rounds the bullets were too big, He had purchased a 9mm 1911 and when we went into the store he asked for 1911 ammo and was sold 5 boxes of .45acp.

Phil talks about it being a nice Christmas gift and I can see that, however at $140 for the kit I don’t see that the wooden box is worth $60 (based on a $20 50 round  box of .45acp). I like the box and it would be nice to look at, but the ammo inside is overly pricy for my taste.

If you would like to see more pictures check out Thefirearmblog.com

Poll: What type of firearm do you shoot the most at the range?

How Does Plywood Compare to a Bulletsafe Vest?

BulletSafe Bullet Proof Vest has started a new series called How Bulletproof? I have seen quite a few videos like this one, of people trying to determine what is “bulletproof” or not, using common items like the plywood. I think if BulletSafe will spend more time on researching legitimate items, like what the Discovery Channel did with Mythbusters, they could produce a great web series that many people would find enjoyable.

How Does Plywood compare to a Bulletsafe Vest?

POLL – How often do you train with your conceal carry pistol?

 

Written for Ammoforsale.com – Which caliber is best?

For the full Ammoforsale.com article click here

(Atticus James) I was asked which caliber I think is best out of the 9mm, .40 S&W and the .45 ACP.

This is not an easy question for me to just flat out say one is better than the other as I own and love all three calibers. Sure the 9mm is cheap to shoot and has low felt recoil so it is fun for most all shooters. The .45 acp has that manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feel. The .40 S&W is a middle of the road round as it was designed to have as much of the best of both the 9mm and the .45 acp.

Before I get to what I feel is the best of the three calibers I would like to give my view points on all three

.45 ACP Review

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The first caliber of the three I ever owned was a Glock 21 chambered in the .45 acp and I have shot so many rounds of .45 acp  that I am very comfortable with the weight and felt recoil.

When I think of the .45acp I think of the Colt 1911 as they are both very iconic together.

Just some of my thoughts on the .45 acp

· In the middle of the cost range between the .40 and 9mm

· Heavy on the felt recoil. After firing the first shot your arms may move so much that it will take longer to get back on target for the follow up shot.

· The ammo is very common and when not in an ammo shortage very easy to find the ammo at competitive prices.

· An all around good caliber to carry as a secondary when hunting.

· Not all shooters are comfortable with the size and felt recoil of the .45.

The sizes of a lot of .45 handguns are large so they are not as easy to conceal. Not that there are not small frame .45s but when you are shooting a .45 you want to have as much grip on that firearm as possible.

9mm Review

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The 9mm is a good all around caliber. The round is not a clear winner to me in any one category so I believe the round should be looked at overall rather than broken down.

The round can have improved ballistics in some categories with a change in bullet weight or bullet type (ball to Hollow-point) depending on what your end goal for the round is.

When moving up in the caliber world from .22lr, one of the next steps to the general shooter might be to the 9mm.

· The ammo (Target or non defensive rounds) tends to be less expensive than the .40 or .45.

· The small round generally means less felt recoil (means better follow up shots)

· The market is flooded with different brands and models of 9mm so the average handgun is not going to be as expensive.

· More rounds can fit into a magazine.

.40 S&W Review

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As I said before, this round was designed with the thought of trying to take the best of the 9mm and the .45 acp and build a new round altogether.

The .40 S&W has become one of the more popular conceal carry rounds only surpassed by the 9mm (in a recent poll conducted buy gearsofguns.com) and followed by the .45 ACP.

Even with the popularity the .40 it is still the most expensive (per factory) round of the three.

· Slightly lower to equal to the 9mm when looking at magazine capacity

· Similar ballistics of the .45

· Less felt recoil than the .45

· Larger round (to the 9mm) means bigger hole.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, when people compare the 9mm to the .40 to the .45 acp they are comparing gun to gun to gun vs. ammo to ammo to ammo. When you factor out the gun and solely look at the ammo your opinion may change based on the type of shooting you plan to use the ammo for.

I love that the 9mm is inexpensive to shoot and still has felt recoil (unlike the .22lr)

I love the .45 ACP because of the manly “I eat my steak bloody and get into boxing matches with bears” feeling.

And I love the popularity and ballistics of the .40 S&W.

Written by Atticus James
Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Gearsofguns.com

About GearsofGuns:
Gears of Guns is a gun blog dedicated to bring information about everything in the Firearm industry. Gears of Guns strives to post the newest guns and latest gun related info we can. We personally try and test as many guns and products as we can. We talk to manufacturer’s representatives and ask the questions that you want answered. We spend many hours researching the information that we present here on the Gears of Guns blog so that you know that the information is true, tried and trustworthy. Visit: www.gearsofguns.com

Name this gun: BCM Europearms CM4 Storm

 

SPECS:

Calibers available: 9mm Luger, 9×21 IMI, .40 S&W
Barrel Length : 6.8inches including muzzle device (175mm)
Overall length: 15.5 inches (395mm)
Weight: 5.2 Pounds (2400g)

Versions available:
CM4 (Carbine)
PM4 (Pistol)

The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm semi-automatic carbine is designed in Italy and has its roots based in the Spectre M4 which was developed by the Italian company SITES in 1980s. This firearm was designed by the same people who designed the Spectre M4 (seen below).

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SITES (Società Italiana Tecnologie Speciali S.p.A.) Spectre M4

The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm was designed for the civilian and security markets. The availability outside of Italy is unclear to Gearsofguns.com at this time.

The platform does not have a manual safety since the firearm uses its own proprietary  SA/DA trigger group. The first trigger pull will always be double action only and each subsequent trigger pull will be single action similar to that of a revolvers SA/DA trigger.

MSRP for the pistol is 1200 euro and 1400 euro for the carbine. 

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Walther Arms– Colt Government 1911 A1 Rail Gun .22lr Review

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Caliber:   .22 Long Rifle
Mag Capacity:    10 or 12 rounds
Weight w/out Mag:    2.25 lbs
Overall Length:    8.6 in
Barrel Length:    5 in
Barrel Twist:    1 in 13-3/4 in
Grooves:    6
Operation:    Blowback
Trigger:    Single Action, 5.5 lbs
Rear Sight:    Drift Adjustable
Front Sight:    Removable, Drift Adjustable
Safety:    Manual Thumb Safety, Grip Safety, Disconnector
Extractor:    Internal + Pinned Ejector
Muzzle Thread:    M8x.75mm

 

Last year I reviewed the Colt Government 1911 A1 .22lr that was made by Carl Walther and distributed by Walther Arms (distributed by Umerex when the review was written). At SHOT 2013 Walther introduced the FDE 1911 Rail gun.

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I wanted to get my hands on one to review so I contacted Walther a few months back to see if we could review the FDE (Flat Dark Earth) but due to a shipping error we got the black rail gun instead (same gun just different paint jobs).

Short history of the name:

The Colt 1911 as suggested by the name was formally adopted by the US Army March of 1911 and given the designation M1911.

Looks:

Since this is a replica of the real 1911, Walther made this gun to look and feel like a full .45 ACP 1911 straight down to the weight which matches the the real colt rail gun.

I think the 1911 is a work of art that has clearly passed the test of time.

Feel:

The gun is not made of plastic so it doesn’t feel like a toy in your hand. This feels like a real Colt 1911 because it is one. 

Price:

The Colt 1911 Rail Gun chambered in .45ACP retails for around $1,200 where as the Walther Colt Rail Gun chambered in .22LR MSRP is $449.99 for the black and $499.99 for the flat dark earth.

.22 Caliber:

The .22 caliber 1911 has a few benefits really worth talking about.

1. You can train with the .22 version at the range if you plan to carry a full frame 1911 and not worry about spending the $18 for a box of 50 .45acps

2. You can train with use of a new laser or flashlight that you plan to attach to your full frame 1911 rail gun.

3. Smaller children can shoot this gun without worrying that the recoil is going to hurt them.

4. .22 LR is a fun round to shoot all day without worrying about how much it is costing you.

Shooting:

This gun shot every type of .22LR rounds that we could find without malfunction.  I really enjoy going to the range with this gun.  It feels like a real Colt 1911. 

Overall Thoughts:

The 1911 is one of my favorite pistols of all time.

The Walther Colt 1911-22 is a great addition to anyone’s collection who is looking for a quality .22 version of the iconic 1911.

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Aaron – Steyr M9A1 first impression review:

This is my first impression on the Steyr M9A1

Technical Specs
Caliber: 9mm
Capacity: 10,14, 15 or 17
Barrel Length: 4 inch
Method of Operation: Short recoil, locked breech
Sights: Fixed iron sights, trapezoid notch and triangular front blade
Overall Length: 6.9 in
Overall Width: 1.2 in
Overall Height: 5.4 in
Safety Type: Multi-stage safety system consisting of two automatic internal safeties, two external trigger safeties and a manual lock safety.
Weight w/out Mag: 26.3 oz (1.6lbs)
Trigger and Tigger pull weight: Double Action trigger – 5.6lbs

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The first thing I noticed with this handgun was it was just beautiful. It has the lowest bore axis of any polymer handgun, which helps with follow up shots and bring the gun back on target.

This is a medium frame pistol which fits my hand nicely.

When I first held this gun it was love.To me it felt like a Tempur-Pedic mattress that conforms to you. It was like the grip was custom made for my hand.

The front sight is a triangle while the rear is an inward facing trapezoid notch. I got used to them

very quickly and I almost prefer these to any sights out there.

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The trigger pull is fairly light at 5.6 lbs and breaks very cleanly.
The takedown of the M9A1 is very quick and easy without any tools.

(Note: this is a random youtube video and was not made by the GEARS crew)

Personally I’ve never got the point of a trigger safety and having no manual one. Since owning this pistol I have fired 200 rounds through it and still love every shot. Muzzle climb is very minimal with the firearm being muzzle heavy and allows for quicker follow up shots.
The shell ejection is mostly uniform launching up and back to the right. Shooting at 6 to 10 yards away I’d say this is one of the more accurate pistols I have shot. A Steyr fan for sure.

Check back for more reviews on this gun in the coming months.