Matthew and the Leupold HAMR Red Dot Scope

A few years back I decided it was time to purchase some new glass. I owned a rather out dated red dot. Among my list of musts, was to keep my red dot, but have the ability to zoom or magnify.

Matt and the HAMR

The Search Begins

I started looking and found magnifiers and EOtech. I wasn’t sold yet on what I had seen in the market. Finally, after a long search, light at the end of the tunnel. I saw the HAMR.

HAMR First Impression

My first impression was that this thing looks awesome! I pulled it out of the box and looked through the lens.

Slim & Low Profile

It was crystal clear as I would expect any Leopold glass to look. The red dot was slim and low profile. I was happy with my purchase, without even mounting it.

Leupold Hamr

Key Features

Let’s focus on the key things that attracted me to buy this scope over so many other choices on the market.

First thing, it’s made for the AR platform in 5.56. Second is the combination of a scope and red dot in one. Finally, the quality and reputation Leopold has.

Detects Motion

My favorite feature has to be how the red dot turns on. It detects motion, so the minute you pick your gun up it’s ready to point, aim and shoot.

No longer do I fumble for the switch or button. The scope has an illuminated reticle, which is a very useful feature.

Rugged Design

This is overall a rugged designed and quality product. I feel sure this is something that will last me a life time.

Red Dot Leupold Hamr

Shot Show 2016 Day Two Round Up

Day Two Round Up

See the top five favs that range from a gun that breaks down into a back pack to a snuf can holder for your rifle?

We also saw ELD, extreme low drag rounds.  And of course what every man needs in his closet is a hanger that will support up to 125 pounds!

Shot Show 2016 has a bit of everything and we are looking forward to discovering more in day 3.  Stay tuned for more coverage!

 

The November Glocktoberfest Review

A Glock 30 Short Frame Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

I like the idea of not trying to be in the first wave of bloggers to review a firearm. I prefer to wait a year after a product comes out to review it because it means I have a chance to request to spend more time with a firearm. That way I get to know it more mindfully without worrying about the other reviewers waiting in the long line to test a firearm out.

I own a few Glocks and my favorite of all of them is my Gen 2 G21 .45ACP 13 round pistol. I requested the Glock 30SF for review about 5 months back, after seeing it at SHOT Show 2014. I have always been someone who loves the .45ACP over just about any other pistol cartridge, because of the size of the round.

GLOCK 30SF

I like knowing I have the power and punch that comes with the .45ACP cartridge. The old saying about carry a bigger stick comes to mind. I do not believe that this love of the .45acp  affects or deters my abilities to do my job when looking at different calibers with an objective view point. Let’s face it, they are all fun to shoot.

Glock 30SF Specs

Caliber: .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol)
Length: 6.88”
Width: 1.27”
Height: 4.80”
Barrel Length: 3.77”
Trigger Pull: 5.5 pounds
Mag Capacity: 10 rounds (standard) 13 Rounds (using Glock 21 mags)

Shooting

As I said, I requested more time with this gun to get 1 or 2 more rounds down range. This brought my round count to around 2500 rounds of ball and jacketed hollow points. I never holstered this pistol, as I use a large frame drop leg holster at the range.

When I first pulled the Glock 30 SF out of the box, the empty mags wouldn’t drop freely. I loaded the mags with 10 rounds each and fired all 20 rounds. After that, they had no problem falling free when I hit the mag release.

The Size

My groupings were better when I was running my Glock 21 mags out of the pistol because I had more real estate to grip the gun with allowing for better control. The 10 round mags just barely allowed for my pinky to be on the gun, not giving me as tight of a grip. The difference was a stray round left or right after shooting a few mags.

GLOCK SF

Cleanings

Normally I don’t worry about keeping review guns clean after every range trip. I like to see how they handle and if they slow down as they get dirtier. I didn’t do that with the Glock 30SF because I didn’t feel there was a need to test something that had been shown for years that even dirty, they work.

I cleaned the gun after every range day and the most rounds put through it at any one time was 800 rounds of Federal American Eagle Pistol .45 ACP 230 Grain FMJ which in my opinion is decently “clean” ammo compared to the Wolf and Tula Steel case. There was just really no good reason to torture test this pistol. When I opened it up, I saw exactly what I expected.

Ammo Used

One thing I have always noted with Glock is that they typically will shoot any brand or ammo type I run through them. I tested a box of brand new Tula steel case. After 5 light primer strikes without any ignition I switched the ammo to my 1911 and didn’t have any problems with the ammo. I have seen this problem before using the Wolf barrel on my Glock 21. However, when using the factory barrel, this was never an issue. I believe this was caused by the Tula primers being seated deeper than spec.

The brands I used:

· Federal (230 Grain ball)

· Wolf Polyformance (230 Grain ball)

· HPR JHP (230 Grain Jacketed hollow point)

· Monarch Brass (230 Grain ball)

· Monarch Steel (230 Grain ball)

· CCI Blazer Aluminum (230 Grain ball)

· Monarch Brass (185 Grain JHP)

· And a few other brands from people who shot the gun with ammo they brought.

In The Box

1 Glock 30SF
2 10 Round Factory Mags
2 Spent brass from the proofing department at Glock
1 “speed” Loader
1 .45 caliber nylon bore brush
1 Plastic Cleaning rod
Paperwork
1 cable lock

The “Speed” Loader

The speed loader they ship is a good thought, in theory, but in my hands it was slow and frustrating to use.  I was always faster hand loading each mag than using the speed loader provided.

Speed Loader

When trying to load the .45s into the magazine you still have to push the previous round down as the loader doesn’t offer enough room for the brass to slide in. The efforts are almost that of hand loading the mag without the use of your thumb on the round. This seems like more procedure and steps to just load one round.  

I do own a Maglula for pistols I found that I was faster using that then by hand.  The speed loader isn’t bad; it just did not work well for me. A few of the other crew members had better luck with it. Everyone did agree, in the end that the Maglula was the fastest.

My Sister and the .45

After getting out of college, my father and I figured if my sister was going to be living alone she needed a pistol to keep at her place. My sister has grown up around guns. She enjoys shooting with me every now and then.

She likes my Glock 21 and is a fairly decent shot with it. I did not want to part with my Glock 21. When I heard one of my friends was selling his Glock 22, I jumped on it and picked it up for a really great price.  I thought about giving it to her, but I just like it too much.

My sister has always lived within a 40 minute drive from my folks so we were never worried about her. Recently she has been looking for another job outside of the state. She has also been expressing more and more interest in getting her conceal carry.

I looked at a few pistols for her but it always came back to wanting the .45acp. I view conceal carry pistols as something you should WANT to shoot. If you enjoy shooting it, you are more likely to train more with it than something you just carry because you were told to.

I have taken her to the range with us a number of times to get some trigger time with this pistol and her comment is always the same “so this is my new gun right”?  “You are letting me keep this one because it fits me and I like it”

For Christmas I have ordered a Glock 30SF for her but now I am sitting here wishing I had ordered one for myself. You just can’t have too many guns, right???

Light Rail

The Glock 30SF has a rail for a light or laser mount. I don’t currently own any pistol lights or lasers due in part to the fact that I haven’t found one that has sparked my interest yet. I honestly haven’t looked that hard either. I am always open to recommendations.

The Recoil

I would equate the recoil to that of the larger Glock 21. This surprised me the first time I shot it as I was expecting a little harsher recoil. Later, I put one in each hand (the 21 and the 30SF) and I could feel that were pretty close to the same weight.  I guess I should not have been surprised.

Conceal Carry Note

At this time in my life I do not conceal carry. 90% of the time I leave the house, the place I am going will not allow me to enter with a pistol. This makes for a tough choice for me, do I carry in my truck and risk someone breaking into the truck because it is older or do I leave my gun at home and just pray I am never in a place where I need it?  I tend to keep my gun at home. One of the crew members is a police officer and I am normally within arm’s length of him. On top of that I live in a good area with very low crime.

Accuracy

I want to tell you that my shot groups looked like I only hit the target with one round. The truth is, even if the gun was that accurate I am not that skillful. The subcompact design is not meant for competition shooters, it is meant for conceal carry. In a conceal carry situation you are not going to try and engage the target at 300 yards like you see in the movies. This pistol, for me, was just as accurate as any of my other Glocks. I can hit a man size silhouette at 50 yards.

Glock 21 Mag

Final Thoughts

I have been a fan of Glocks’ for years (I know, you couldn’t tell). The subcompact Glock 30 SF is just another in a long line of quality pistols they are known for. While picking up this pistol from my FFL I was asked if I wanted to purchase their Glock 43 Single Stack 9mm. My only comment was, why mess with 9mm when you can have the power of a .45acp?

I wish I could get more range time with this pistol just because it is fun to shoot. If you get the chance to send some lead down range running this pistol I highly recommend it.

Gift Giving Suggestions

As said earlier in this article, I will be gifting this gun to my sister. That being said, she has shot many different calibers and pistols. She knows how to handle her firearm and herself. She knows she prefers Glocks. This was an easy choice for me.

As it is getting closer to the holiday season I would like to add this word of advice to anyone thinking about buying any pistol as a gift. If the person you are purchasing for owns a lot of firearms as it is and you know for fact they are comfortable with different pistols, go for it. If not, please think about taking them to a store and seeing if they like the pistol first.

I have seen too many couples at the range, where the guy bought a pistol for his significant other without letting her size the gun up first. I see them getting into situations that makes everyone uncomfortable. It can occasionally put them and others in harm’s way since they cannot handle the firearm yet. 

Buying a caliber that someone is not comfortable with shooting yet can cause people to be turned off by shooting. It can even cause them to mishandle the firearm and put themselves and other people in a dangerous situation.

Introducing someone to a firearm first is always the safer bet so they get a chance to have some hands on time. They can say whether they like the weight and if they like how the gun shoots. I know you are not always able to test first a gun before you buy it, but it is worth renting that caliber firearm first. I strongly recommend letting the gift receiver try it out at the range to see how they respond. This is always a smart idea. Firearms make a wonderful gift, just make sure it’s a wonderful experience.

Steel

    Olight M1X Striker Review

    I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

    With this being the 4th flashlight I have reviewed on GEARS you might be wondering if I really use a flashlight that often and if I need all of them. You might think a flashlight is a flashlight is a flashlight in terms of finding one you like based on your needs and how that flashlight SHOULD be your “end all”… or at least until you find a new “end all” flashlight if you use one enough.

    My Truth

    My truth is a little different; I collect flashlights because there is always a time and place for each of mine. I have a small Extremebeam 160 Lumen that I like to keep on me when I am going for lightweight or when I am wearing a suit. I have my Olight 1100 Lumen Hulk of a flashlight I keep in my bag that goes everywhere with me. Then I have my LED Lensor 1000 Lumen and my Olight M1X Striker that I use in my everyday carry because they are perfect in size and weight for my day to day work.

     

    Olight M1X Striker Review

    Specs

    Olight M1X Striker Specs

    Olight M1X Striker

    I had been looking at a different flashlight from Olight when it was suggested I check out this light as it fit the specs I was looking for.

    Olight M1X Striker Batteries, and Charger

    My Specs

    · Has to fit comfortably in the front pocket of my pants without taking up too much pocket
    · Has to use standard type batteries like CR123.
    · Has to have a heavy duty pocket clip that is reliable and replaceable.
    · Has to be bright
    · Has to fit my hand comfortably
    · Has to be a single LED

     

    Daily Use

    As I said, this is one of the flashlights I use in my daily rotation. It gets used at least a few times a week and I haven’t noticed any wear in the function of the light. Yes, there are minimal blemishes on the body from dropping the flashlight. There isn’t any wearing on the coating like you might expect from being slid in and out of my pocket or from sitting in my pocket.

    The Olight M1X Striker is made of a multi part aircraft grade aluminum body and all the parts screw together with a tight tolerance feel so you are not worried about it unscrewing on you.

    Illumination

    The 1000 Lumens is sure to illuminate any area you are looking at. The lower .5 lumens setting is so you can run your light for days without recharging. The .5 Lumens would be great for backpacking if you want to drop as much weight as possible but still have a dependable flashlight. Chances are you are not going to need the brightest light in the world if you are just fiddling around with setting up camp or just looking around the campsite at night.

    The Clip

    The clip is pretty strong and always snaps back after yanking on it. It is connected to the flashlight with just a C-loop so if you do pull it really hard it will just disconnect from the flashlight and not break the clip off.

    The Olight M1X Striker has 2 buttons on it. The top thumb on/off switch and a mode switch near the light end. This makes it easy to change the mode without doing that stupid dance that single button flashlights have when they have different modes.

    I like to be able to quickly change my mode. I try to keep my clip pointed at the mode switch so when I pull the light out and have the on/off switch at my thumb I can quickly find the mode switch with my pinky.

     

    Gun Mounts

    Olight offers a couple of mounts for their light. I have not put this on anything, I use it for my EDC.

     

    The Battery

    The batteries are a pro and con topic for me. The Olight M1X Striker does not ship with a battery and I do some what understand the reasoning behind that. The 18650 battery is not one you can just pick up at the local big box store. I am guessing the thought is; most people will want a rechargeable. Rather than hiking the cost of the flashlight by adding one of their batteries (their 2600MAH sells for $20 on their website).  Olight will just offer them to you or let you just order your own from someone else. I picked up an Ultrafire 2pcs 3.7v 18650 3000mah Rechargeable Battery plus a NiteCore-i2-I2 Universal Intelligent Charger for two batteries on Amazon for $17.

    OLIGHT REVIEW CHARGER AND BATTERIES

    As you can see in the picture above I have two CR123 batteries in a battery sleeve. As you might have guessed but now you can see, I use 2 CR123 batteries stacked on top of each other with this sleeve that comes with the flashlight instead of using the 18650. The run time has been shorter in my experiments with the light but for those of us who use sights and other lights that use CR123 batteries this makes for a nice quick change if you don’t feel the need to order a new battery.

    Final Thoughts

    The Olight M1X Striker, as the name implies, has a striking bevel. I haven’t been walking down any dark alleys and been attacked while I have had this light so can’t talk about how good or bad it is. This light is built to be solid and ready to handle whatever you might throw at it.

    Olight has a massive line up of flashlights that seem to be built with the user in mind and not just building a flashlight. Things like the mode switch, c-loop clip, 1000 lumens and the battery sleeve for CR123.

    If you are looking for an EDC that has high lumens for a great price, Olight is a good place to start.

    Poll: Tech in Shooting

    302133_227607357365691_1583359249_n

    I have noticed as I go to the range lately, I carry out about 75 pounds of gear. This doesn’t even include my guns and their respective cases.

    Range Tech in the Range Bag

    While a lot of what I carry to the range is related to reviews and just normal work equipment, I have noticed that over the past few years my distance range tech as increased and yet my range distance hasn’t.

    I have observed more people with lasers and lights and camera mounts on their $700 M&P-15. I have asked a few why they have this mounted at all times and they tell me that they just need it. Mind you this is not your SWAT officers or Texas National Guard, I am talking to, but that guy who has been in the semi-auto rifle game for 2 years.

    Constant Evolution

    Like most every other industry, we are subject to constant evolution with the tech world. I carry out my electronic spotting scope for any shots over 25yds. I wear electronic ear muffs to help me hear and still mute the shooting. I use laser trainers at home to help me with my rifle and pistol skill. Tech is replacing the old school shooting world which is helping us with our shooting skills.

    Old School

    I look back to my grandfather’s era of hunting and shooting and how the trail cameras were the tracks you saw on the ground, the e-spotting scopes were binoculars and monocular spotting scopes, the laser trainers were tin cans on a fence.

    It is interesting to me, to see the distance shooters at my local range who are much older and the worries they have are about the clarity of their glass on their high end scope and the twist rates of their bolt action rifles. Then I see the younger shooters looking for every piece of tech they can get their hands on to make them the next top shot.

    Controversy

    Personally, I love the tech. Even with how tech is changing and making some interesting splashes in the gun industry. Some tech is even controversial such as the Barrett Optical Ranging System (BORS) or the Tracking point systems giving shooter an easier time making the right calculations to hit their target out at 1000+ yards.

    Shooting World has Room for All

    Change can be scary to some people. All I know is that you can adapt to the new tech in shooting or not. Old school and new school, both have their amazing shooters who defy what we think is possible.

    POLL: What is your MAIN sight you use on your go to MSR?

    Nikki With Leupold Scope | Gearsofguns.com

    While in the gun shop this past week I overheard a conversation between a new AR-15 owner and his friend asking about what his main optic should be.

    I have been asked this question a lot over the years and I always ask them a few questions before I give them my opinion.

    1. How often do you plan to shoot this rifle?
    2. You have just dropped $1000+ on a rifle what is your optic budget? Also what other accessories do you plan to use on this rifle and what is your budget for that?
    3. What kind of shooting do you intend to do with this rifle? Bench rest (distance), short range (100yds max/ home defense) or a mix of both?
    4. Do you plan on taking any shooting classes with this rifle?

    After hearing their responses I have a better idea as to what kind of shooter they are and what they might want.

    What kind of questions do you ask yourself before you make a decision on your optic choice?

     

    Panzer – Leupold VX-3 3.5-10X40mm Reviewed

    2013-08-12 18.37.53 2013-08-12 18.38.17

    This review will start like so many of my previous in Las Vegas at the Shot Show 2013. Since I was planning an elk hunting trip that fall  and had very little knowledge about optics and sights I made it my mission to collect as much info as possible. I had done a little long-range shooting but never took the time to learn the subtle nuances of high-powered rifle optics. Five months later and the final search for a scope was on. We followed up with Leupold and spoke with Sarah Kirby who is the Marketing Communications Assistant for Leupold & Stevens, Inc. She was very eager to help us find the perfect scope for what we needed. The attention to customer detail is phenomenal at Leupold, anything we needed and even things we had not thought of Sarah was ready to help. After consulting with her scope experts at Leupold they suggested the Leupold VX-3-10X40mm with the Matte 1 in reticle. She explained it might take 6-8 weeks for the scope to arrive and within 3 weeks I had my new scope. We forgot to ask for the mounting rings but a week later she suggested the Leupold duel dovetail mounting system for my Winchester model 70.  It is possible to mount the scope yourself, but in order to ensure a perfectly aligned scope I took it to SMR firearms because my gunsmith had the right tools and expertise.

    Here is a list of the specs for the VX-3.

    Low

    High

    Actual Magnification

    3.30x

    9.70x

    Linear Field of View (ft/100 yd)

    29.80ft

    11.00ft

    Linear Field of View (m/100 m)

    9.90m

    3.70m

    Eye Relief (in)

    4.40 inches

    3.60 inches

    Eye Relief (mm)

    112.00mm

    91.00mm

    Weight (oz)

    12.60oz

    Weight (g)

    357.00 g

    Objective Clear Aperture (in)

    1.60 inches

    Objective Clear Aperture (mm)

    40.00mm

    Elevation Adjustment Range

    52.00 moa

    Windage Adjustment Range

    52.00 moa

    As I previously mentioned I had a little experience with long range shooting but never had I hunted large game in the mountains and the last thing I wanted was my scope to be the reason I missed my shot. I needed to be able to take down a large game at 300 yards with as clear of an image as possible.  The first day I tested the scope at TDSA range in Ferris TX, I learned the difference between sub par optics and superior quality.  With the help of a friend at TDSA, who was much more skilled, I sighted my rifle in at 200 yards using the non-turreted toolless finger adjustments. It was fairly easy to figure out how to dial in correct adjustments with 1 cm per click. With the generous eye box I had no problem quickly finding the sweet spot in the scope and setting up for the shot whether at 25 or 300 yards. My favorite feature is the adjustable power ring which acts like a zoom dial quickly bringing distant targets into clear view. My confidence level quickly grew as I pushed my abilities to their limits combining the dependable accuracy of my rifle with the preciseness of VX-3 optics.

    2013-08-12 18.40.18

    2013-08-21 13.58.26

    The proudest moment for me was once I put my money where my mouth was at the range in Colorado right before the hunt. My father, who accompanied me, was ready to see what I could do. After hitting a perfect bull’s-eye I proceeded to do it 3 more times at 300, 350 and then 400 yards at varying elevations. I turned around and noticed my dad with a look of satisfaction that meant “alright I think you are ready”. Thanks to all the time at the range in Texas I was very comfortable with what the Leupold VX-3 has allowed me to shoot at various elevations and distances. Most impressive was that I didn’t need to mess with the scope after a month which included a 13 hour drive and a very rough ride on the back of the ATV. I didn’t have to worry about my accuracy because the durability of the scope design protected it from bumps.

    While in the mountains the elements put my equipment to the test with rain, mud, snow and ice on the daily. I noticed my eye glasses were fogging regularly while my scope remained crystal clear. Usually Leupold uses nitrogen gas sealed inside the scope which prevents condensation on the lens but with elect scope models, as with the VX-3, uses 2nd generation Argon/Krypton Waterproofing which not only reduces the effects of thermal shock, but also works better at preventing fogging and condensation inside the scope from forming. My other concern was scratching the lens since dirt and dust were inevitable out there. What  I did not realize at the time was that my scope was treated with lens coating called DiamondCoat 2 which not only protects the lens from abrasion but greatly enhances light transmission which increase clarity.

    2nd Generation Argon/Krypton Waterproofing

    While we still waterproof other optics with bone-dry nitrogen – technology pioneered by Leupold® – Select models feature our exclusive, proprietary Argon/Krypton gas blend. Its advantages are two fold: it nearly eliminates the effects of thermal shock, and the Argon/Krypton molecules are significantly larger than nitrogen molecules, reducing the diffusion of gases sealed inside your scope even more than our proven nitrogen technology already does. We pioneered riflescope waterproofing, and now with Argon/Krypton we’re exceeding the standards we set ourselves.

    [From the Leupold.com website]

    Overall Thoughts and comments:

    After all the time I practiced for that perfect 300 yard shot my elk walked a mere 50 ft. in front of me. I truly enjoyed the opportunity to take the Leupold VX-3 with me on the hunt and have learned what superior quality optics can do when put to the test. Overall I feel the Leupold VX-3 is a reliable scope for the hunter or range shooter because it offers flexibility, durability and top of the line quality for around $600 MSRP. For middle of the road cost you get top quality glass from a company that in my experience not only goes out of their way for you, but seems to take great pride in their craftsmanship as evidenced by the life time warranty.  I was unable to find anything wrong with my scope, and  trust me I did try, but I can not wait for my next hunting trip.

    Pros and Cons:

    • Easy to use from box to sighting in.
    • Durable design meant did not have to worry about easily getting damaged and stood up to the elements.
    • The adjustable power ring for clear image at various distances
    • DiamondCoat 2 for abrasion resistance and enhanced light transmission
    • Non-turreted toolless adjustment for windage and elevation made sighting in actually fun
    • Eye box and eye relief made for easy target spotting at various distances

    Review of the Aero Precision ULTRAlight scope mount

    A few months ago I was contacted about doing a review on the Aero Precision ultralight scope 1” mount.

    DSCN1070

    This is a 6061 T6 extruded aluminum construction body with a MIL-A-Type 3 black hard-coat anodize coating. If you don’t know what that means it means it is very lightweight (2.98oz) and has a matte black hard coat finish.

    This was designed for the AR platform and I had it on both the ZA-15 and the Colt LE901 chambered in the .308 and the 5.56. With my ZA-15 we sighted in at 100yds without a rail riser but when we were using the Colt we needed a riser for our Leupold VX-2 scope.

    The price for this scope mount is $85 which is a great price for a higher end one-piece construction AR scope mount.

    The scope mount uses Cross-slot keyways to connect the rings together rather than 4 hex screws per ring. This help with recoil protection.

    DSCN1071

    Overall I like this mount with how lightweight it is. I believe that this is an excellent value for the money for it being a solid mount.

    ATI SKS Strikeforce Stock with Scorpion Recoil System review

    SKS review2013-03-09 14.39.15

    This SKS has been in my armory since I was a young boy as it was given to me by my late grandfather.

    When I got into my teens the stock was too short for me to comfortably shoot and so if I wanted to shoot prone or standing I would have to have a buttstock pad to extend my length of pull on the rifle so the scope wouldn’t come back and hit my glasses.

    Last year at shot show I talked with ATI about getting the Strikeforce Stock with Scorpion Recoil System for the SKS and they agreed to to send it out for review.

    I know some of you are asking yourself why I would take this gun out of this clean nice looking stock if my only problem was the length of pull which is easy to remedy. The easy answer is I was looking to update this rifle plain and simple.

    The SKS fires the 7.62x39mm round which is very common and cheaper than .223 and some times you want to just go to the range and blow off a little steam and feel a little more recoil than a .22lr and the SKS and AK-47 have been great for that. however I have gotten more accustom to having a pistol grip and I wanted one for this rifle too.

    The Strikeforce Stock with Scorpion Recoil System comes with three rails for the front of the stock so you can attach lasers and bipods.

    It has a 6 position AR style side folding buttstock and I haven’t found anyone who has used  over the 3rd position on this stock.

    Specs

    • Six Position Adjustable/Side Folding Stock
    • Can be Fired from Folded Position
    • Scorpion Recoil System
      • Scorpion Razorback Recoil Pad
        • Non-Slip, Removable
      • Scorpion Recoil Pistol Grip
        • Sure-Grip Texture
      • Recoil Impact is Absorbed
      • Shooting any Load Size can now be done without pain being transferred to the shooter
      • Not Affected by Chemicals
      • Remains Flexible in Extreme Temperatures
      • Eliminates the Felt Punch of the Recoil
      • Removes Limitations from Spring and Piston Type Recoil Suppression Systems
    • Military Type III Anodized, 6061 T6 Aluminum
      • One 4” Picatinny Top Rail
      • Two 2” Picatinny Rails
      • Six Position Commercial Buffer Tube
      • Buffer Tube Adapter
    • Blank Covers for When Rails are Not in Use
    • 3M Industrial Grade Self-Adhesive Soft Touch Cheekrest Pad
    • Removable/Adjustable Tactical Cheekrest
    • Slot for Tactical Sling Attachment
    • Five Sling Swivel Studs
    • DuPont® Extreme Temperature Glass Reinforced Polymer
    • Manufactured in the USA
    • Limited Lifetime Warranty

    Overall Thoughts:

    I still felt recoil both from standing and prone but it was very manageable and light.
    If you are looking to update and modernize your SKS it is hard to go wrong with this stock.

    What do you keep on your AR rifle?

    So the question I have is this what do we keep on our rifles that we have forgotten about?

    I’m sure you are sitting there thinking I have this, this and this on my rifle. what do you mean I have forgotten about something? Well what are the rail attachments that we bought and mounted to our guns because we thought we needed that micro red dot or that IR laser but 90% of the time we only hunt or shoot from the bench with our rifles so these extras don’t get used.

    My Samson forend is set up for quad rails and I have two little 2” on the left and right side of the rifle near the barrel in case I wanted to mount a camera or micro red dot or a laser but more times than not I use my main scope for all of my shots and never use that laser.

    Bare boned my rifle weighs in at 8 pounds but once I start adding the scope and the forward grip and a laser and my micro red dot my rifle gets heavy at 11-12+ pounds.

    Do we need to periodically review what we keep on our rifles and assess what we keep on them?

    Redring® Shotgun Sights

    The Redring® shotgun sight is an optical shotgun sight. It mounts to the standard ribs on a shotgun, you simply attach it like you would a normal rail attachment with the exception of using the rib of the shotgun not a rail.  Two little hex key screws lock the sight in place.

    TECH DATA

    • Battery: AAAA 1.5V, Approx 300 h life. Redring® automatically shuts off after 4 hrs
    • Weight: 134 g (4.726oz) excluding mounts, 192 g (6.773oz) including mounts
    • Length: 134 mm (5.275in), mounts included
    • Width: 44 mm (1.732in)
    • Height: 45.7 mm (1.779in)
    • Material: Anodised aluminium
    • MSRP: $899 (they have a deal going on now for $749.00)

    ctn947_260_5357_0_-3__Redring%20Pic8

    This sight is lets you keep both eyes open so when you look through the optic what ever the ring is around is where you burst is going to be.

     

    1. Spot-Metering

    Redring® has built-in intelligence, called spot metering, that reads the backlight in a diameter equivalent to more than double the ring diameter. An integrated processor momentarily adjusts the ring intensity to the prevailing light. Dark background = weaker ring. Bright background = stronger ring. The directed spot metering gives the shooter a great advantage in all types of hunting with varying lighting conditions, such as duck shooting in the sunrise. Light intensity can also be set manually

    2. The Red Ring

    Another advantage of using the Redring® is that it also is an effective rangefinder. The size of the ring on the target equals the shot diame­ter/burst at 20 meters (65 feet). This gives the shooter an instant indication if the target is within shooting range or if it’s too far away for a sure shot. When the ring looks right, pull the trigger. It surely improves the hit rate and reduces the risk of injuring the game.

    3. Low mount with recoil absorption

    Redring® is mounted free-floating directly on to the rib of the gun. It only takes a couple of minutes to mount and the sight is ready to use. No alterations or changes to the gun are necessary. As the lightweight sight is mounted low on the shotgun rib, it will not have any noticeable effect on the balance of the gun. Redring® comes complete with recoil absorbing mounts for shotguns with a rib width ranging from 5 to 11.5 mm.

    TARGET DISTANCE INDICATOR

    The ring gives the shooter perfect aim and indicates when it’s safe to shoot and when it’s not. When the targetlooks right in relation to the ring, that’s when it’s time to shoot. The result is greater accuracy, more fun and more reliable hunting. A sure hit!

    PARALLAX FREE

    Redring® enables the shooter to fire with both eyes open, irrespective of eye dominance. The open eyes principle improves the perceptual tendencies and helps the shooter to identify the target faster. Since Redring® is parallax free, what the shooter sees in the ring equals the target image, i.e., when the ring is right in relation to the target, the shot most certainly is a hit. The eye relief doesn’t matter.

    USB FUNCITION

    Redring® can be connected to your computer via a USB interface. This enables the shooter to register the equipment, log personalized statistics, select advanced settings, and receive periodic software upgrades from manufacturer. Go to USB for instructions and downloading the necessary software.

    Automatic Shut Off

    The built in energy saving “shut-off” function will automatically shut off the sight after 4 hours. The shut-off time is counted from the time the sight is turned on, or from the last time the ring intensity was manually adjusted.

    [From the Redring website]

     

     

    Sadly at SHOT 2013 I missed this booth because I was busying trying to see everything I had planned,  so I didn’t get to see this up close like I wish I had.

    More packages showed up last week

    2013-03-09 14.36.06

    Lancer LS AWM (Advanced Warfighter Magazine) (5.56NATO AR-15 Magazine) 

    2013-03-09 14.37.42

    X-Products (formerly XS-Products) 50 Round AR-15 drum magazine

    2013-03-09 14.39.15

    SKS Ultimate Professional Strikeforce Stock with Scorpion Recoil System

    2013-03-10 16.39.34

    (SKS in the new stock)

    2013-03-10 16.40.13

    2013-03-10 16.41.37

    2013-03-10 16.42.18

    Reviews coming soon.

    BATTLE MUG 2

    Revenge of the mug? I don’t know.

     

    Battle-495x660

    For those of you who thought $250 was a little much for a mug but you still thought “needed” one for your “armory”… They are now manufacturing them out of polymers to reduce the cost.

    If someone wanted to send us one we wouldn’t mind doing a range review on it.

    If you missed out on the first installment of this mug you can read about it HERE