Freedom Ordnance FM-9 Belt Fed Upper Receiver

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Having a belt fed rifle sounds awesome doesn’t it? While everyone else is having to constantly change out magazines every 30 rounds or so, you are able to just keep slinging lead down range to your hearts content. Who wouldn’t enjoy that feeling?

Who Wants to Stop?

Until recently, you would have to cough up the dough to purchase a machine gun to enjoy such pleasures. And you know the cost of firing it would add up quickly; even .223 can cost quite a bit when you are shooting a couple thousand round. Because, let’s be honest, you’re not going to want to stop after a couple of boxes.

Firearm Cost vs Ammo Cost

Recently there has been a trend of semi-auto only “machine guns” being released. We recently reviewed one here by Ohio Ordnance. And while they are cheaper and easier to purchase than their full auto counterparts, the high cost for the firearm and the cost of ammo will quickly take its toll on your wallet.

Solutions

Freedom Ordnance has released what they believe to be the solution to this problem, with their FM-9 belt fed upper receivers. You can just take any AR15 or M16 lower that you currently own, and attach their complete upper. You now have a belt fed 9mm in your hands and the world’s largest grin on your face.

Elite Model

At a much cheaper cost of entry and the relatively cheap cost of ammunition, this seems to solve all problems of purchasing and owning a belt fed firearm that previously came with owning something this unique. Additionally, if you choose to purchase the Elite model, or elect to upgrade to it at a later date, you have the ability to quickly change the barrel.

While this may not seem like it would be an important feature, it will save you a lot of time waiting on your barrel to cool off. It will also help to extend your barrel’s life if used properly.

Shoot Slow? Hell NO!

Now let’s just be honest here, you are not going to be shooting this slowly! You will get this in your hands and want to throw ammo downrange as quickly as you can. That’s whole purpose of owning a belt fed; shooting fast and not having to reload every 30 rounds.

New Trigger

If you own a M16 lower or a drop in auto sear, this will be easy. Just thrown it into full auto and enjoy. If you are not fortunate enough to own one of those, don’t worry. This is still fun to shoot in semi auto, but I would recommend looking to purchase a binary trigger or a slide fire stock to simulate the full auto experience.

Quick Linker

The other thing that you will want to look into purchasing would be a quick linker. It is not necessary for the complete firearm to function, but will save you a lot of time and is well worth the investment.

What’s the Cost?

I know what you may be thinking, “this sounds great and all, but what is the catch? There has to be something wrong with it.” Well the price is still a little higher than I would expect at about $1300, but this is still much lower than the other belt fed options. And while Freedom Ordnance website does state that only certain ammunition seems to work well, the 9mm is still a relatively cheap round to fire.

Drawbacks?

The biggest drawback that I have seen for this system, is that when it comes time to purchase a new barrel (unfortunately, shooting fast you will probably go through barrels very quickly) you will have to buy Freedom Ordnance barrels and cannot select one from another manufacturer. This is to be expected, as nobody else has anything like this available. It also ensures that what you are putting on your gun will function as designed.

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Head Turning at the Range

For anyone looking for an exciting new toy for the range that is guaranteed to turn heads, I think does the trick. If you can’t afford something like the Ohio Ordnance 1919 or the FNH M249S, I think this is a great alternative. You still get the enjoyment of running a belt fed firearm, but at a much lower cost of ownership. Just throw some form of optic on it, and enjoy.

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My Brightest Review Yet!

The LED Lenser X21R.2 Review

 

If you think you can handle a review half as powerful as the SUN, click here to see the video review of this monster flashlight.

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I did finally figure out the answer to why… BECAUSE.

 

 

Shot Show 2016 Day Two Round Up

Day Two Round Up

See the top five favs that range from a gun that breaks down into a back pack to a snuf can holder for your rifle?

We also saw ELD, extreme low drag rounds.  And of course what every man needs in his closet is a hanger that will support up to 125 pounds!

Shot Show 2016 has a bit of everything and we are looking forward to discovering more in day 3.  Stay tuned for more coverage!

 

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Before I talk about this 1919A4 belt fed firearm I have to talk about Ohio Ordnance Works. I have never met them in person but I can tell you I have the upmost respect for the men and women of this company. Normally when working with a firearm manufacturer I work with one person and if I have any problems they are the only one I can contact to get a problem resolved. This company however is not like that. When I had a problem with the 1919 on a Tuesday morning I did not speak to my contact Bob Conroy I spoke with the owner directly. I will talk more about that a little later on and help further explain why I have to open with these comments.

Ohio Ordnance Works 1919A4 Bundle Review

M1919A4 Specs+

Designed: 1919
Number built: 5 million
Variants: A1; A2; A3; A4; A5; A6; M37 and AN/M2
Weight: 31 lb (14 kg) (M1919A4)
Length: 37.94 in (964 mm) (M1919A4)
Barrel length: 24 in (610 mm)
Cartridge: .30-06 Springfield and 7.62×51mm NATO
Action: Recoil-operated/short-recoil operation
Rate of fire: 400–600 round/min
Feed system: 250-round belt

The OOW M1919A4 is classified as a belt fed rifle.  The machine gun classification is for full auto only, making this gun a semi auto and available without a NFA tax stamp.

The Backstory

As many of you may have already seen and heard, Ohio Ordnance Works has redesigned the BAR and made it their H.C.A.R. (Heavy Counter Assault Rifle). This is a very cool looking rifle but it honestly was not the first thing that peaked my interest when I first came to their website. While scrolling through their guns I saw the semi auto 1919A4 Bundle which is a SEMI AUTO belt fed tripod rifle. Side note: this means you cannot put the sig stabilizing brace on this and turn it into a pistol (I found this out at my FFL holders shop when I told him all the cool kids were making pistols and I wanted one too). When I saw that, the first thing that went through my head was this is AWESOME! who doesn’t want to own a belt fed gun? and that is when I saw the price. $3,997. I honestly figured they would have this priced to be closer to $7000+.   On top of all of that, the gun at the bottom of the page is a 1919A4 with a Cleaning Kit, Manual, Headspace & Timing Gage, and the .308 Trunnion Shield for $2500.

YOU ARE TELLING ME I CAN OWN A BELT FED RIFLE FOR THE SAME PRICE AS 2.5 AR-15s? Sign me up!

Let me put two images in your head.

1. You pull up to the range, get out of your truck, walk to the firing line and pull out the same plain Jane AR-15 that every other shmuck has and shoot it

or

2. You pull up to your private range, back up into your bay, unload a 1919 A4 out of your truck and not give a s**t about what anyone else thinks because you own a belt fed tripod rifle of glory?

That is what I thought.

OOW 1919A4 Bundle Specs

Bundle Includes:

· 1919A4 Semi-Auto

· Manual

· Tripod, Pintle, T&E

· Headspace & Timing Gage

· Custom Cut Pelican Case

· 1919A4 Linker

· Cleaning Kit

· 1,000 Links

· Spade Grip

· .308 Trunion Shield

· Parts to Convert Gun to .30-06

· Membership Access to Video Tutorial

The Bundle

When my gunsmith got the M1919A4 in he told me he saw the parcel service driver spending more time than normal in the back of the truck so he walked outside to see what the deal was and the driver told him he needed to get his dolly to carry this box into the shop. My gun smith told him that he didn’t need to worry he would just help him carry it in. In his words, “that was a mistake”.

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The pelican case isn’t grossly over heavy but it’s a long case that is meant to be carried using the handles or rolled using the built in wheels, making it easy to move. In the cardboard box it was heavy and awkward.

Inside of the custom cut Pelican case the rifle also comes with:
Manual
Tripod, Pintle, T&E
Headspace & Timing Gage
Cleaning Kit
Spade Grip
.308 Trunion Shield
and Parts to Convert the Gun to .30-06

You also get:

1000 Links (they link .308 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield and 8mm cartridges)
Membership Access to Video Tutorials (this is very important)
and the 1919A4 Linker

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The Ammo

Our good friends over at Luckygunner.com sponsored the .308 used in this review.
We used 1000 rounds of 308 Winchester 180 Gr Sp Prvi Partizan

Be sure to check them out for all your ammo needs.

Linking

When the rifle first came in Ohio Ordnance Works was out of stock of the linker so they shipped it without one. The crew and I had plans to get this gun on the range as quick as possible because it was going to rust from all the drooling if we didn’t.

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[1000 links in a plastic box I purchased)

I called over one of the guys to come help me hand load 500 rounds and I can tell you from experience this is a bloody ordeal and I am thankful I never have to do that with this gun ever again. It took two people about an hour of linking to get all the belts made (we made them into 40 round belts.)  When we got the linker in a few days later, it took me 23 minutes by myself to do the same amount.

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Shooting

As I said, we shot 1000+ rounds of .308 through the M1919A4. It was the most fun you can have without full auto.

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I tried both the spade grip as well as the standard grip and both of them are fun to shoot. I think I like the standard grip more because it means I don’t have to take the M1919A4 down to put it back in its case… maybe I am just lazy.

Changing Barrels and Cleaning

This gun comes with a membership to videos on how to change the barrel and take apart the gun and they do a much better job at explaining this than I can. I will say I have watched the videos every time I have cleaned this gun and when I had to fix the gun to insure I don’t miss anything. The videos are helpful and comprehensive.

The Problem and the Solution

On the first range trip, we shot about 250 rounds before I broke the gun. Yes I admit I broke it and I am kind of happy it happened. I have no idea why the detent pin bent but the pin that rides in the channel from the extraction arm bent out of place and stopped the gun from working. Ohio Ordnance Works said, “it was probably a fluke, a wriggling out of place by the pin. We’ve made tons of these and not had an issue like that. They are new/grad A surplus, so you may have found one that just wasn’t perfect.”

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I am happy about breaking the gun because of the experience I had afterwards. I hate breaking guns. I know as a reviewer I can be hard on gun but normally we know their limits and where the maximum amount of safe operating abuse is and we err on the side of caution. This however was not abuse. We were still warming the M1919A4 up when it bent.

This killed the mood at the range. Since this is a review gun and it was a weekday morning I called Ohio Ordnance Works to try and figure out what had happened. I spoke with the young lady who answered the phone and she told me, Bob Conroy wasn’t in the office.  She transferred me to Mr. Landies instead. Under stress, my vocabulary resorts to almost grunting so when Mr. Landies got on the phone and started helping me he was very understanding at my lost of proper terminology and told me that a picture is worth 1000 words or in my case 3 words and a grunt. So I e-mailed a photo of the bent part and he e-mailed me back just a few minutes later asking for a shipping address.

The following day I had my whole family over for lunch. When I got a knock at my door from the shipper with the part, you might say I was very surprised. I had figured I wouldn’t get this gun fixed for a few days at a minimum, but they overnighted the part to me. This blew me away, no one does that. No one ships you the part overnight unless it is a dire emergency. To say the least, I was impressed.

About a month ago, while on Instagram, I saw that Ohio Ordnance Works had posted a picture of a gentleman holding a beautiful rifle with the caption of Happy birthday boss… Mr. Landies. As it turns out I wasn’t transferred to some shop floor guy who builds the rifles but to the owner of the company. Again… no one does that.

After fixing the gun we took it back on the range a few weeks later and the gun ran like a champ. Screen Shot 2015-06-02 at 6.28.23 PM

Final Thoughts

The gun is battle tested. I never had any doubts that this was a good gun, if it wasn’t, it would not still be in service all over the world.
While owning this 1919A4 only makes me feel cooler in my head, I know that I will not be taking this out to the range every Sunday. I know that it is a special occasion gun than is very expensive to just play with.

This is a gun that has a lot of history attached to it and since Ohio Ordnance Works has made this M1919A4 to be as affordable to own as possible I think it is a very nice piece to have in anyone’s collection. Plus, when your friends are bragging that they own a Tavor or a SCAR 17 you can just look at them and say “that’s cute, I own a belt fed tripod rifle”.

I have been very impressed with this company from the first time I spoke with them on the phone. They have always been very helpful and ready to work with us. I know I say this a lot, but I truly love the gun community. There is, bar none, not a single community with more caring and awesome people.

Video: Jerry Miculek shooting 1000 yards with a Barrett .50BMG in 2 seconds

Jerry Miculek is fun to watch. He is always trying to make cool trick shots that are just incredible feats. I had to watch this video twice to understand what happened. He was using the balloon as an aiming point and not as a target. The reason for the balloon popping is the splatter from the .50 hitting the steel plate. I am fascinated by how people are pushing the envelope of what people thought was possible.

Magpul dynamics is teaching people to take .308, which we thought to only have a max effective yardage out to 800-1000 yard and they are pushing them out to 1200+. For those of you who believe you can take this shot with ease like he did, I challenge you to pull off his 9mm revolver stunt and hit the steel plate at 1000 yards.

 

Poll: Tech in Shooting

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I have noticed as I go to the range lately, I carry out about 75 pounds of gear. This doesn’t even include my guns and their respective cases.

Range Tech in the Range Bag

While a lot of what I carry to the range is related to reviews and just normal work equipment, I have noticed that over the past few years my distance range tech as increased and yet my range distance hasn’t.

I have observed more people with lasers and lights and camera mounts on their $700 M&P-15. I have asked a few why they have this mounted at all times and they tell me that they just need it. Mind you this is not your SWAT officers or Texas National Guard, I am talking to, but that guy who has been in the semi-auto rifle game for 2 years.

Constant Evolution

Like most every other industry, we are subject to constant evolution with the tech world. I carry out my electronic spotting scope for any shots over 25yds. I wear electronic ear muffs to help me hear and still mute the shooting. I use laser trainers at home to help me with my rifle and pistol skill. Tech is replacing the old school shooting world which is helping us with our shooting skills.

Old School

I look back to my grandfather’s era of hunting and shooting and how the trail cameras were the tracks you saw on the ground, the e-spotting scopes were binoculars and monocular spotting scopes, the laser trainers were tin cans on a fence.

It is interesting to me, to see the distance shooters at my local range who are much older and the worries they have are about the clarity of their glass on their high end scope and the twist rates of their bolt action rifles. Then I see the younger shooters looking for every piece of tech they can get their hands on to make them the next top shot.

Controversy

Personally, I love the tech. Even with how tech is changing and making some interesting splashes in the gun industry. Some tech is even controversial such as the Barrett Optical Ranging System (BORS) or the Tracking point systems giving shooter an easier time making the right calculations to hit their target out at 1000+ yards.

Shooting World has Room for All

Change can be scary to some people. All I know is that you can adapt to the new tech in shooting or not. Old school and new school, both have their amazing shooters who defy what we think is possible.

VIDEO TUESDAY!!! TAOFLEDERMAUS Experimental Shotgun Rounds

 

TAOFLEDERMAUS back at it working with his experimental 12G shotgun shells. I do not advocate that ANYONE mimics or tries what he does with testing these experimental rounds but I do think it is an interesting thing to watch. Something I would personally love to see is the inside of that Mossberg barrel. He has shot some rather strange items through it and I am curious how it has stood up to that.

Forbes.com: Meet The ‘Liberator’ (Full 3D printed gun)

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“Alright. One…two…”

Before “three” arrives, a shot reverberates across the overcast central Texas landscape. A tall, sandy blond engineer named John has just pulled a twenty-foot length of yellow string tied to a trigger, which has successfully fired the world’s first entirely 3D-printed gun for the very first time, rocketing a .380 caliber bullet into a berm of dirt and prairie brush.

“Fuckin’ A!” yells John, who has asked me not to publish his full name. He hurries over to examine the firearm bolted to an aluminum frame. But the first to get there is Cody Wilson, a square-jawed and stubbled 25 year-old in a polo shirt and baseball cap. John may have pulled the trigger, but the gun is Wilson’s brainchild. He’s spent more than a year dreaming of its creation, and dubbed it “the Liberator” in an homage to the cheap, one-shot pistols designed to be air-dropped by the Allies over France during its Nazi occupation in World War II.

[Read the full article HERE]