Poll: What type of firearm do you shoot the most at the range?

POLL: MSR Distance

 

Remington 11-87 Sportsman Field Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Skeet shooting is one of my favorite past times, give me a thrower, clays, ammo and a shotgun and I will be busy for hours (or until the clays run out). I had the rare chance to meet up with Jessica of the Freedom Group (who owns Remington) at SHOT 2014 so we could review firearms from the Freedom Group. Naturally I was drawn straight to the shotguns because of my love of them.

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I was fortunate to grow up in a Boy Scout Troop who owned 2 Remington 870s and a number of other shotguns. During shooting campouts I would run (with the guidance of an NRA certified adult) the shotgun and .22lr rifle groups. Over the years we had various leaders of the troop bring in shotguns on the campouts that included semi auto, pump, bolt action and break action. I had a chance to really get a feel for many different kinds of shotguns and brands.

Remington 11-87 Sportsman Field

SPECS:

Weight: 8.25 lbs. (3.7 kg) with 28inch barrel
Length: 48”
Barrel length: 28”
Cartridge: 12 gauge
Action: Semi-automatic
Feed system: 4+1 rounds, internal tube magazine

KEY FEATURES:

· Wood and Satin Blued Configuration
· Solid Walnut stock and fore-end with Satin finish and Fleur-di-Lis checkering
· 12 gauge with 28″ RC barrel and Mod Choke
· Dual bead sights
· Nickel plated bolt and gold trigger

Shooting

I got this shotgun back in March 2014, we have taken it to our range every time and shot about 500+ shells through it. I have only cleaned it about 3 times. One of the shooters we work with was not a proficient skeet shooter. He just doesn’t have many hours logged on the shotgun range. After about 10 clays thrown, with the Remington 11-87, he started asking for 2 clays to be thrown at a time. He was hitting them about 75% of the time. He commented later that it gave him fast follow up time making it easier to hit the clay before it was too far out. He felt he did much better with this shotgun because of how smooth the recoil was and the fact it was semi auto.

Between myself and a friend of the GEARs crew we shot 95 shells for 90 clays.

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My Final Thoughts

I loved this shotgun. I really like everything, from the looks of the shotgun to the recoil to the smooth action. This shotgun just felt great in my arms.

The MSRP is $845 which is a middle of the road priced semi-auto 12 gauge. If you are looking for a shotgun that is going to last you for generations to come with easy maintenance, this is a shotgun you will want to put on your list.

Colt LE901 Modular Multi-Caliber Rifle Review

I have been wanting to get my hands on the LE901 since Colt first debuted it at SHOT Show 2012. After 2 years of waiting, I finally got the chance to shoot this AWESOME rifle.

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In the caliber war debates, I have always stood with the .308 WIN as my favorite AR caliber. There is something about sending 150 grains of lead down range without killing your shoulder that always makes me happy.

Colt LE901 specs

I had this rifle for 3 months and we shot roughly 500 rounds down range without one problem. I asked Colt to send the mag well adapter, 5.56 spring and buffer and a LE6940 5.56 upper with the LE901. I shot mostly Liberty Silverado .223 ammo using the Colt LE6940 and found that the combo worked well at keeping the barrel clean.

Thoughts about the multi-caliber system

I hate spending money twice on the same part for two guns like a trigger or butt stock. I know what I like, so typically I am going to replace the parts that don’t feel right, with ones that do. This rifle makes that problem go away. You only have to own one lower, one trigger group, one pistol grip and one buttstock that is your personal preference.  Then you have different uppers for the different needs. This way you can have a .308 win for the bench and a .223 for run and gun.

 

 

Caliber change

To change the gun just takes just a few seconds. All you need to change is the buffer and spring. Have your mag well adapter block on the 5.56 upper and that just drops in the mag well and using the same pins for the .308 win upper.  This is quick and easy to do on the fly, making this gun a breeze to use in either caliber.

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Other Calibers

Since the .300 blackout was designed for the .223 AR platform you could also use it for this rifle.

The LE901’s .308 upper is propriety and only used on this rifle. This means you don’t have the option yet, to change to the other heavy calibers like other AR-10 style rifles, namely .243 win.

When that day comes, this rifle truly will start exceeding anything else in its class. The AR-15 already has so many different uppers from .22 conversions to .50BMG bolt action to crossbows. The introduction into the .308 mag well calibers truly unlocks it full potential.

Shooting from the bench

This rifle has the stock Colt trigger which I really have never been a fan of, but it still does a good job of not being sloppy and hard breaking.

On the bench at 300 yards I was shooting a 2 inch group which is more a comment on my lack of distance skills than the rifle itself.

Run and Gun

We took this gun and set up a few shooting courses at the range for fun and found we like the heavier .308 more for the course than we did with the lighter hitting 5.56. We kept forgetting the .308 Magpul P-mag Colt shipped with the rifle, was 20 rounds and that our 5.56 P-mag is 30.  We would run the course like we had 30 rounds vs. the 20 we really had loaded.

Cleaning

This rifle is like any other AR style when it comes to cleaning.

Ambidextrous controls

Since I am right handed, I mostly used the bolt release on the right hand side of the rifle which was nice. However, I would have also liked the ability to lock the bolt on the same side.

Owning this rifle

I do plan to buy one of these rifles someday, for the simple fact that it is one lower for multiple uppers.

Overall thoughts

I loved this rifle and I do plan on trying to get another one for review and maybe purchase in the future.

As a stock Colt rifle this is built to be used and abused and takes it. The Colt tradition of making great firearms is very much alive and well in this rifle.

Name this gun: BCM Europearms CM4 Storm

 

SPECS:

Calibers available: 9mm Luger, 9×21 IMI, .40 S&W
Barrel Length : 6.8inches including muzzle device (175mm)
Overall length: 15.5 inches (395mm)
Weight: 5.2 Pounds (2400g)

Versions available:
CM4 (Carbine)
PM4 (Pistol)

The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm semi-automatic carbine is designed in Italy and has its roots based in the Spectre M4 which was developed by the Italian company SITES in 1980s. This firearm was designed by the same people who designed the Spectre M4 (seen below).

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SITES (Società Italiana Tecnologie Speciali S.p.A.) Spectre M4

The BCM Europearms PM4 Storm was designed for the civilian and security markets. The availability outside of Italy is unclear to Gearsofguns.com at this time.

The platform does not have a manual safety since the firearm uses its own proprietary  SA/DA trigger group. The first trigger pull will always be double action only and each subsequent trigger pull will be single action similar to that of a revolvers SA/DA trigger.

MSRP for the pistol is 1200 euro and 1400 euro for the carbine. 

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Aaron–FN-H SCAR Mk 17

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SCAR SPECIFICATIONS:
Caliber: 7.62 NATO
Action: Gas operated, Semi auto center fire
Receiver: Aluminum upper, polymer lower
Barrel: 16.25″ cold hammer forged, chrome lined
Overall Length: 38.5″ and 28.5″ with the stock folded
Trigger pull: nonadjustable, single stage; 6lbs, 5oz
Empty Weight: 8.0 LBS
Capacity: 10 or 20 round proprietary box magazine
Price: $2,900-$3,350

The SCAR Mk 17 was a new addition to the U.S. arsenal that entered service in 2009. It fires the bigger 7.62×51 NATO round compared to the 5.56 that the US uses most. This versatile solution was made by FN Herstal out of Belgium for the US SOCOM forces.

The 75th Ranger Regiment were the first soldiers to get their hands on the SCAR’s first models. The US military has canceled orders on the Mk 16 version of the SCAR and has started to get the SCAR Mk 17 with plans to purchase 5.56 conversion kits for the rifle. This was one of the competing firearms to replace the aging M4 Carbine.

For the civilian market, FNH has also created a semiautomatic version imported over as the SCAR 17S. SCAR is an acronym for “Special Operation Forces Combat Assault Rifle,” with the name proclaiming its original intended purpose.

There are many other things that this rifle has improved on P1110336-1024x684P1110336-1024x684from the current assault rifles the US uses. This rifle contains a short recoil system similar to a Saiga shotgun, allowing a cleaner operation than a direct impingement system. FNH is claiming a 90% cutback of the carbon build up in the action over the AR style of rifles.  This should mean a lower amount of maintenance that you would have to perform to keep this firearm functioning.

The short recoil system helps lessen the recoil with shooting larger calibers. A firearm with short stroke recoil has a heavy bolt carrier assembly that the piston is in contact with for only a short amount of time. The recoil force is spread over a longer period of time with this beefy bolt carrier, allowing for more accurate follow up shots on target.

With the SCAR 17, the controls are mostly ambidextrous. The magazine release and the safety can be operated from both sides of the firearm but the bolt catch is only on the left. The charging handle is actually attached to the bolt like an AK is which is potentially dangerous to the user, and will reciprocate with the bolt while firing. While firing a firearm with a reciprocating charging handle, it can throw off the balance of the firearm while shooting.