Name This Gun: 7-13-16 Answer SX-1 MTR

Ritter & Stark SX-1 MTR [UPDATE]

 

Ritter & Stark SX-1 MTR Sniper Rifle

Ritter & Stark SX-1 MTR Sniper Rifle Broken DownThe SX-1 MTR is an Austrian bolt action rifle that has an interesting modularity to it. It was designed by the Russian team who helped bring the Orsis T5000 to life. They have built a platform that allows the end user to customize this rifle not only in stocks, pistol grips and triggers but also in calibers as well.

The SX-1 can be chambered in .308Win, .300Win Mag and .338 Lapua… almost as if they knew all my hopes and dreams…     *clears throat* as I was saying the modularity of this rifle is rather impressive. The picatinny rails are attached to the barrel rather than the receiver so that you don’t have to rezero the rifle every time you change calibers if you want to mount three different optics to the barrels.

The SX-1 does not use three bolts but rather one, that with a quick change of the bolt head, you can change calibers. Okay, so the carrying case is going to be big to fit all that expensive glass you are going to have mounted to each barrel, but we can save “some” space with the lack of three distinct bolts.

When it comes to how the rifle feeds, you might be asking, am I going to be spending $100s on extra mags for each caliber? No, because they offer magwells that use SR-25 style mags for your .308 and Accuracy International Mags.

The trigger is a Remington 700 so you can get after market triggers for this rifle which is an excellent feature.

The stock and pistol grip use standard AR platform stocks and grips so you can customize the rifle even more. Personally, if I owned this, I would use the SIG Brace and call the whole rifle my pocket pea shooter.

Sig Brace

I don’t know about you, but I only would shoot this rifle off hand from a standing position, with a sig brace and arm fully extended. That is how you get SUB SUBMOA.

[Insert epic photo of Atticus riding a Griffin while shooting this rifle with a Sig brace]

 

FN Ballista

The FN Ballista has similar features in that it can be rechambered to the same calibers, however it is lacking on some of the modularity that the Ritter & Stark SX-1 MTR has.  Such as. the interchangeably of the stock, and possibly the trigger (I cannot not remember if the FN Ballista uses a trigger like that of the Remington 700)

On the topic of Remington Defense we look to their XM2010.
Remington Defense XM2010

Are you noticing a theme here?  While this rifle is just an upgraded version of the Remington 700 (M24 or M40) it has the same looking features as the Ritter & Stark SX-1 MTR and the The FN Ballista just without interchangeability (GET ON THAT REMINGTON! Also make it available to us).

I have yet to find anyone selling the Ritter & Stark SX-1 MTR rifle in the US. I am hopeful that maybe they will think about bringing it here by 2017 with an introduction at SHOT Show 2017.

(UPDATE from Ritter and Stark)

”Only one important thing you missed I think, the bolt is locked into the barrel breach not a barrel extension, locking lugs machined in the breach. Main idea was to create a very stable shooting platform and get rid of parts between the scope and the barrel. So basically the rifle itself is the barrel.”

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Editorial: Standardizing vs. Proprietary

A few weeks back I reviewed a Windham Weaponry .308 AR style rifle. When I finished the review I contacted my local gunsmith as well as Windham and asked if they knew of any standardization in the .308 AR market.  I wanted to know if anyone had made a pattern for the upper and lower as well as the Bolt Carrier Group (BCG).

standard vs proprietary

The question seemed straight forward, however the answer isn’t. Long story short, no. No one has made a standard to which everyone is following.

(Note: I am using the 5.56×45 and the .223 Remington interchangeably in the article even though they are not the same cartridge.  AR stands for Armalite Rifle not Assault Rifle).

History

In 1955 and 1956 Armalite designed the first prototypes of the original AR-10 chambered in the 7.62×51 (.308 Winchester.)  By 1957, the first AR-15 using the intermediate cartridge 5.56×45 NATO was designed and then sold to Colt due to financial problems that Armalite was having.

Is Anything New Anymore?

Since the AR-10 was designed before the AR-15 it would seem we haven’t taken a step forward but a step back in time. Thanks to Government bans, such as the 1994 Assault Weapon Ban that ended in 2004 and other set backs, the modern sporting rifle world has been trying to play catch up for the past 11 years.

Intermediate vs. Rifle Cartridges

I have never really been a fan of the .223 Remington (5.56x45NATO) and I know I am not alone in this distaste. I have always liked the 7.62x39mm or the newer .300 AAC Blackout when it comes to intermediate cartridges. The .308 win is a rifle cartridge that fits more than just the distance shooting bill. The fact of the matter is that the .308 and the 5.56 have been on the battle field for almost the same amount of time and yet we chose the less ballistically versatile round for civilian and military applications.

DPMS/SR-25 Magazines vs. Proprietary

When building a new firearm platform you have to consider the way your firearm is going to hold rounds. In the the bolt action world we typically use an in-stock style magazine, for the lever actions and shotguns we use a tube and elevator (shell carrier) system, for the semi and full autos we have a choice. Belt fed (seen mainly in past in full auto only but is making it way back in semi auto versions of full auto machine guns) or magazine fed.

The .308 ARs are all based on the smaller AR-15, so you would think after seeing the success of the AR-15 magazine market it would be smarter to stick with what works. But we are still in a relearning stage in the firearm world about supply and demand. The FN SCAR 17 uses a proprietary .308 mag but the SCAR 16 uses STANAG (AR-15 style magazines). When FN released the SCAR 17 to the general population they had problems keeping magazines in stock because they were trying to keep the military contracts filled and just they couldn’t keep up with demand. That’s a problem with proprietary.

The DPMS/SR-25 style magazines are now being made by a number of different magazine manufacturers which means I can order as many as I want.

Standardizing

The AR-15 is known as the Legos for adults. Everything is changeable. If I want a nickel boron BCG I can find a company I like and replace mine in my AR-15.  If I want a new charging handle I get one. If I want to put a .50BMG bolt action upper on my lower I can. This seems to me like a great idea. However in the .308 AR world we have yet to reach an agreement as to what the specs should be.

Final thoughts

Until they all come to an agreement about standardizing, the consumer market for the .308 AR is left with fewer options.  To me, more options means more money back in the pockets of the firearm manufacturers.  More money to the manufacturers means more money can be spent on R&D, which means more advanced guns in the future.

Poll: Tech in Shooting

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I have noticed as I go to the range lately, I carry out about 75 pounds of gear. This doesn’t even include my guns and their respective cases.

Range Tech in the Range Bag

While a lot of what I carry to the range is related to reviews and just normal work equipment, I have noticed that over the past few years my distance range tech as increased and yet my range distance hasn’t.

I have observed more people with lasers and lights and camera mounts on their $700 M&P-15. I have asked a few why they have this mounted at all times and they tell me that they just need it. Mind you this is not your SWAT officers or Texas National Guard, I am talking to, but that guy who has been in the semi-auto rifle game for 2 years.

Constant Evolution

Like most every other industry, we are subject to constant evolution with the tech world. I carry out my electronic spotting scope for any shots over 25yds. I wear electronic ear muffs to help me hear and still mute the shooting. I use laser trainers at home to help me with my rifle and pistol skill. Tech is replacing the old school shooting world which is helping us with our shooting skills.

Old School

I look back to my grandfather’s era of hunting and shooting and how the trail cameras were the tracks you saw on the ground, the e-spotting scopes were binoculars and monocular spotting scopes, the laser trainers were tin cans on a fence.

It is interesting to me, to see the distance shooters at my local range who are much older and the worries they have are about the clarity of their glass on their high end scope and the twist rates of their bolt action rifles. Then I see the younger shooters looking for every piece of tech they can get their hands on to make them the next top shot.

Controversy

Personally, I love the tech. Even with how tech is changing and making some interesting splashes in the gun industry. Some tech is even controversial such as the Barrett Optical Ranging System (BORS) or the Tracking point systems giving shooter an easier time making the right calculations to hit their target out at 1000+ yards.

Shooting World has Room for All

Change can be scary to some people. All I know is that you can adapt to the new tech in shooting or not. Old school and new school, both have their amazing shooters who defy what we think is possible.

Mossberg ATR™ NIGHT TRAIN™ 27204 .308 Bolt Action Review

I have been provided the materials needed for this review. However, my opinions are entirely my own and I have not been paid to publish positive comments.

Normally I don’t put the model number in the title but with the number of different options Mossberg offers  for the rifle I want to be specific on which rifle I reviewed.

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Specs

Caliber: .308 WIN
Capacity: 5
Barrel: 22” Fluted
Rail: 6” Picatinny Rail
Scope: UTG 6-24x50MM w/ Illuminated Reticle, Sun Shade and Lens Protectors
Twist: 1:10
Length Of Pull: 13.25″
Finish: Matte Blue
Stock: Synthetic (Multi-Cam Camo)
Weight: 9.5 lb
Overall Length: 42″
MSRP: $891

Features:

LBA Lightning Bolt Action Adjustable Trigger
Free-Floating Button-Rifled Fluted Barrel
Scope and Bipod Included
4+1 Capacity, Top Load Magazine
Free Gun Lock/2-Year Limited Warranty

First Impressions

Growing up in the Boy Scouts, I knew Mossberg for two reasons. They made the Mossberg .22 bolt action rifles my troop owned for shooting sports and we had a Mossberg 500 12 Gauge shotgun we would use. When I was in the market for a new 12 Gauge I contacted Mossberg because they make the Mossberg 500 Flex which lets you customize your shotgun for your shooting needs.

You can pick up a wide range of different parts to make your gun more tactical or more home defense. If you want to keep it a normal bird gun, you can change the length of pull with different recoil/length of pull pads that snap in and out of the buttstock.  After a year of shooting the Mossberg 500 Flex 12 gauge, I wanted to do more work with Mossberg.

I requested the Mossberg ATR™ NIGHT TRAIN™ 27204 .308 Bolt Action Rifle for review. The gun, out of the box, makes you feel like you were just handed a sniper rifle and you are going to be able to take down all the bad guys from 4 miles* away. The scope is over a foot and a half long (w/ sun shade) and it has a the multi-cam stock fluted barrel and bipod.

Man, this Mossberg ATR looks like it can hit a dime from miles away*. (* The GEARs Crew understands that the max effective range of a .308 Win is 800-1000 meters. The distances named are for this writers dramatic impact only and should not be the expected results.)

Shooting and Feel

After getting the Mossberg ATR sighted and realigned I started out shooting 20 rounds at the 100 yard range getting the rounds to go through the same hole. When I felt comfortable, I moved on to the 300 yard range and noticed that the optic was fuzzy in the beginning. I had expected this, since it is not a very high end scope.

I had the steel gong as my target which I figured I would hand load each round and do a rapid engagement of 10 (3-5 seconds per shot to reload) back to the 300 yard target, even with my speed the rifle maintained about a 6 inch grouping. After about 80 rounds my shoulder was not fatigued. The rifle had the right length of pull for my size, making this rifle rather enjoyable to shoot with all day.

The barrel is threaded into the action and not one solid piece. This is normal, however the chamber is not as forgiving to someone who is hand loading each round vs. using the magazine to load the rounds. I would have liked to have seen a feed ramp on this, but for the price of the Mossberg ATR, it still feeds like it should.

The bolt does have good play and good flow when manipulating the bolt to load rounds.

The recoil as mentioned above is not overwhelming so if you shot more than 100 rounds you shouldn’t be running for the ice pack.

Scope

The UTG scope is good if you are not planning to shoot past 100 yards. The scope that Mossberg mounted on this rifle was fuzzy until we shot about 20+ rounds. The scope prisms must have moved to the correct spot and cleared up enough to shoot the 200 yard range. It was still fuzzy and hazy at 300 to the point you could not see your hits on high visible targets.

When we first took the rifle to the range the scope had not been zeroed and it took about 20 rounds to zero in. I never used the Illuminated Reticle since it was a bright sunny day every day we went to shoot.

With this being said, if I am able to continue reviewing this rifle, I would look at a relatively inexpensive scope upgrade to a Redfield Revenge 6-18x44mm scope with an MSRP of $314.  This upgrade keeps the look of the rifle and scope package with a better optic.

Bipod and Rail

The Caldwell bipod is “adjustable” however, when I tried adjusting the height, the legs never matched up enough to give a stable shooting platform. Thankfully, I did most of my shooting off the bench and not from prone, so the short legs were at the correct height.   I personally feel that Mossberg would have been better suited to have the bipod attached by picatinny rail verses the “permanently” mounted Caldwell. In keeping with how I would upgrade this rifle, I would unmount the bipod and have a gunsmith mount a 3” picatinny rail on the flat bottom of the stock allowing for a bipod and other types of sling mounts.

The scope rail is a 5” picatinny rail. This is nice, but in terms of upgrading this rifle I would change to Leupold dovetail scope rings and so I would have to change the rail. Mossberg does make this possible as the rail is not wielded to the action.

Modularity

Mossberg introduced the Mossberg flex line of shotguns and MVP rifles. Although this rifle doesn’t need to be changed into a pistol grip rifle, I would have liked to have seen the buttstock length of pull modularity added into the design of the of the ATR™ NIGHT TRAIN line of centerfire rifles.

I think Mossberg is really onto the next gen of designs by adding features like the modularity they have already introduced. It would be great if companies like MAGPUL who already make stocks for Mossberg shotguns started adding new stocks and parts to Mossberg Flex line of modular rifles and shotguns.

Trigger

For those of us who are trigger snobs, you should like the Mossberg’s no gunsmith needed adjustable trigger. I didn’t mess with this trigger adjustment as I was having issues with the scope and my review focus changed.

Final Thoughts

The Mossberg ATR was designed for someone getting into the art of distance shooting. This gun is for someone who doesn’t want to spend $800 on a bolt action rifle that won’t have a long life and then drop another $400 or $500 on scopes and rings and bipods just to get your first shot down range. This gun has it all for $891 MSRP.

Out of the box, this rifle is ready to be sighted in and taken on a hunting trip or just to the distance range. The upgrades I have talked about are not something you will have to get if you are starting out and learning how to shoot. As a shooter gets more proficient at shooting longer and longer ranges that is the time to start thinking about upgrading.

I have loved shooting the Mossberg ATR. As a proficient distance shooter, I would love to be able to report back with my findings after some simple upgrades to an already extremely well built bolt action.

Aaron – McMillan Alias Family Bolt Action Rifle Systems

mcmillan-alias-star-tactical-rifle

When I look at this weapon system, I see a futuristic laser gun. This firearm has a  much more tactical look than a Remington 700.  The Alias just looks sexy. It looks like the future. I feel like you can talk to it. The Alias family of rifles is a totally new platform of rifle that is totally customizable.

These rifles are made from a clean sheet and built completely from the ground up. The McMillan is made to harbor a ton of interchangeable parts. It reminds me of my childhood with my giant box of K’NEX, building whatever I wanted.

The McMillan Alias has so many capabilities, giving it such an advantage in a military or SWAT scenario. You can customize each of these firearms to the mission at hand. You have the option of carrying a couple extra parts in case of a mission change.

There are three models in the Alias family. The Alias CS5 is a concealable subsonic/ supersonic suppressed sniper system. The Alias STAR is a standard tactical application rifle that is designed to meet the common mission requirements. Last but not least the Alias TARGET is their competition configuration rifle.

The Alias CS5:

This rifle is very compact. The CS5 is designed to be stealthy, discrete and easy to conceal. This system has the ability to shoot both subsonic and supersonic ammunition and gives the rifle the ability to serve several roles.

With the CS5, everything in the system is designed for conceal ability. The suppressor and buttstock can be detached to reduce the overall length to 23.5 inches. The compact Alias CS5 is perfect for SWAT and other elite law enforcement agencies as well as military tactical units that require a small concealable and tactical bolt action rifle. When you combine the suppressor with the subsonic ammo, it brings the sound to a whole new low.

ALIAS CS5 SPECIFICATIONS:

Action: McMillan ALIAS

Caliber: .308 Winchester

Barrel: Length- 12.5″, Stainless Match Grade, 1-8″ Twist, Threaded with Muzzle Brake System

Length: 23.5″ Disassembled, 32.5″ Disassembled with Butt, 38″ Fully Assembled

Trigger: Anschütz®

Buttstock: Adjustable and foldable

Forend: Tube or Quad

Pistol Grip: Tactical

Suppressor: Elite Iron Bravo (SD only)

Typical MV, Supersonic: 2150 – 2250 fps with McMillan Ammunition

Typical MV, Subsonic: 950-1050 fps with McMillan Ammunition

Magazine: Detachable McMillan Alias family bolt action rifle systems

The Alias STAR:

This rifle can be ordered with the barrel lengths from 18.5″-24″ for customization for your size. The STAR is designed for the most common tactical situations military or law enforcement may find themselves in.

When making the Alias STAR, McMillan had input from elite military teams. The buttstock is adjustable to any body type and height like the other rifles. The Alias STAR easily meets the military’s standards for a multi purpose bolt action sniper platform.

STAR SPECIFICATIONS :

Action: McMillan ALIAS

Calibers: .308 Winchester, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5×47 Lapua

Barrel: Length- 18.5-24″, Stainless Steel Match Grade, 1-11″ Twist. 308 Win, 1-8″ Twist: 6.5 Creedmoor, 1-8″ Twist: 6.5×47 Lapua, Threaded Muzzle with Thread Cap

Length: 29″ Disassembled, 38″ Disassembled with Butt, 44″ Fully Assembled

Trigger: Anschütz®

Buttstock: Tactical

Forend: Tube or QuadPistol

Grip: Tactical

Suppressor: Optional

Magazine: Detachable Magazine, 10 Round

Finish: Black

Weight: 11.6 lbs.* / without Suppressor

Carry Case: Full Size Gun Case Provided

The Alias TARGET:

This rifle was developed with the competition shooter in mind. Using insight from world champion high power shooters, almost every aspect of this rifle is adjustable for the person using it.

The TARGET rifle is a true ace right out of the box, winning numerous high power and long range championship events and setting records. Like the other two, this rifle will fit anyone and is easy and fast to change settings during competition shooting.

ALIAS TARGET SPECIFICATIONS:

Action: McMillan ALIAS

Calibers: .308 Winchester, .308 Palma, 6.5 Creedmoor, .260 Rem, 6.5×47 Lapua, 6XC

Barrel: Length- 24-30″, 1-10″, 1-11″, 1-12″ Twist: .308 Win

1-13″ Twist: .308 Palma, 1-8″ Twist: 6.5 Creedmoor, 1-8″ Twist: .260 Rem, 1-8″ Twist: 6.5×47 Lapua, 1-7.5″ Twist: 6XC

Length: 33″ Disassembled, 42″ Disassembled with Butt, 48″ Fully Assembled

Trigger: Anschütz®

Buttstock: Competition

Forend: Competition

Pistol Grip: Competition

Magazine: Two Detachable 10 Round Magazines and One Single Shot Loading Block

Finish: Black

Weight: 12 Lbs.

Carry Case: N/A

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Izhmash Prototype VS-121 Sniper Rifle

Not only is Izhmash making a new bullpup rifle chambered in the Russian 7.62x54mmR and the 7.62x51mm but they are also working on a new cartridge for this rifle!

I am excited about this and I know Caleb is too as he loves bullpup rifles.

 

[Thanks to The Firearm Blogs followers for the news]  

Noreen BN36

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Caliber: 30-06 Springfield, 270 Winchester, 25-06 Remington
Operation: Direct Gas Impingement, Side Charging Semiautomatic
Barrel Length: 22″
Weight: 8lbs.
Rifling: 1-10 Twist
Stock: A2
Pistol Grip: A2
Sights: Optional
Magazine: 5, 10, 20 rd.
Trigger: Mil-Spec or Optional Match Trigger
Muzzle Brake: Noreen Design, 5/8-24 Thread

This was one of my favorite new rifles to see come out at SHOT ‘13. Noreen has been on my radar since I first stumbled upon The Noreen Bad News .338 Lapua AR style rifle.

One of my favorite old service rifles was the M1903 which fires the .30-06  (also one of my favorite calibers) so it was natural I was drawn to this rifle.

There were a number of .300 Win Mag and .338 Lapua AR style rifles out at SHOT but this rifle really caught my eye because of the .30-06 chambering since that caliber is almost as common as the .308s and .223s. It makes great sense to make a rifle that is so familiar, like the family of ARs, but in a higher caliber.

More from SHOT 2013

Turnbull TAR-10
Turnbull TAR-10 auctioned off for $136,024 at SHOT 2013

 

Suppressed rifle at the AAC booth
Suppressed rifle at the AAC booth

DRD Tactical Paratus 16
DRD Tactical Paratus 16

Chiappa Triple Barreled Shotgun
Chiappa  Triple Threat Shotgun

Old Man Lefty at the SUREFIRE booth
Old Man Lefty at the SUREFIRE booth

The McMillan ALIAS
The McMillan ALIAS (STAR)

Scoping out the show
Scoping out the show

Ares Defense Belt Fed AR-15
Ares Defense Belt Fed AR-15

 

Full assembled DRD Paratus 16
Full assembled DRD Paratus 16

Remington Defense XM2010
Remington Defense XM2010

ArmaLite Introduces the All New AR-30A1

ArmaLite Introduces the All New AR-30A1

AR-30A1 Target Version
30A1BT300 (The target AR-30A1 in .300 Win Mag)
30A1BT338 (The target AR-30A1 in .338 Lapua)
ArmaLite Inc. ® proudly introduces the all new AR-30A1. The AR-30A1 is the next generation of ArmaLite’s highly acclaimed bolt action rifles – the ULTIMATE long range target and tactical firearm. The new AR-30A1 is available in a target version and a standard version. Both versions are available in .338 Lapua and .300 Win Mag.
On the surface, the AR-30A1 bears a family resemblance to its predecessor, the AR-30. But, every individual component of the AR-30 was scrutinized in the AR-30A1. As a result, only the pistol grip, buttpad, trigger, and a few small components from the AR-30 passed muster for the AR-30A1. All other components are new and/or improved. The result is a firearm that maintains its predecessor’s outstanding accuracy, light weight, and soft recoil while dramatically improving its ergonomics, adaptability, versatility, reliability and ease of use.
Features of all versions of the new AR-30A1:
Muzzle brake threads on the end of the barrels employ threads that are standard for the sound suppressor industry (5/8 x 24 for the 300 Win Mag and 3/4 x 24 for the 338 Lapua). So, many sound suppressors can be screwed directly onto the barrel without the need for an adaptor.
The long, 26” barrel in the .338 Lapua enhances muzzle velocity, flatness of trajectory, and terminal ballistics. The 24” barrel of the .300 Win Mag balances ballistic performance with portability.
A tough, through-hardened receiver means reduced wear and increased smoothness.
The bolt-mounted safety mechanism locks the firing pin to the rear. This design is stronger and more secure than a sear or trigger blocking safety because it directly blocks the firing pin itself.

The metal cheekpiece is very durable and the elastomeric cheekpiece pad provides a comfortable shooter interface in all weather conditions.

The cheekpiece supports contain integral cleaning rod guides that prevent damage to the bore due to inadequate cleaning rod control.
Multiple sling installation locations allow simultaneous use of a sling and a bipod. And the rear sling swivel can be moved to either the left or right side.
To provide very compact transportation, the entire buttstock assembly can be quickly and easily removed with only one allen wrench.
The standard and target buttstocks are interchangeable on any receiver with use of only one allen wrench.
Military grade anodizing and phosphating finishes enhance durability and corrosion resistance.
Features specific to the AR-30A1 Target version:

A top 20 MOA Picatinny rail that is 18 inches long over the receiver and barrel will support any scope and accessory devices such as night vision devices. Picatinny rails on both sides of the forearm allow installation of other devices.
The cheekpiece is vertically adjustable for 1 inch of adjustment without the use of tools so that each shooter, regardless of their facial features, can obtain an optimum cheek weld while still achieving a clear sight picture.
The buttstock can be adjusted without tools for lengths of pull from 13.6” to 15.6.” This makes the AR-30A1 ergonomically correct for shooters from the 5% female to 95% male. Shooters can also quickly adjust length of pull to accommodate changes in clothing or shooting position. In addition, with a single allen wrench, the buttpad is adjustable for height.
A 1913 accessory rail at the bottom of the buttstock allows for installation of additional accessories such as sling swivels or monopods.
Performance characteristics of all versions of the AR-30A1:

ArmaLite’s testing has proven the muzzle brake to be the best in the industry for both reducing recoil and increasing accuracy. This makes shooting the AR-30A1 comfortable for even the smallest or recoil-sensitive shooter.
The competition grade barrel and our patented V-block receiver bedding system are keys to the AR-30A1’s minute of angle accuracy. ArmaLite’s patented V-Block™ Bedding Wedge and V-Block Stock assure absolute strength and repeatability for superb accuracy. The aluminum stock reinforces the receiver like a bench-rest sleeve.
The magazine of any mag-fed firearm is critical to reliable feeding. The AR-30’s magazine underwent extensive development testing to assure reliability of feeding. It is made of steel, not polymer or aluminum, to provide years of heavy duty service.
The single stack design of the AR-30A1 magazine minimizes the material removed from the receiver for the mag well. This significantly contributes to the strength and stiffness of the AR-30A1 receiver.
The deep magazine well under the receiver makes magazine insertion fast and easy, while holding the magazine in exactly the correct position for reliable feeding.

An ambidextrous magazine catch is centrally located so that the shooter can release the magazine and catch it with the same hand. Reloading is fast, and the expended magazine won’t be dropped to be lost, damaged or muddied.
The rifle balances just in front of the magazine well. So, the rifle can be easily and comfortably carried near the rifle’s balance point with only one hand, freeing the other hand for other critical activities.
The powerful ejection system and generous ejection port eject even loaded .338 Lapua cartridges rapidly and reliably. The large ejection port also makes single loading of cartridges through it easy and fast.
The ergonomically improved bolt handle design and “competition grade” dimensions and tolerances in the receiver allow lightning-fast, butter-smooth reloading.
The buttstock can be removed with one allen wrench for compact transportation or storage. In confined areas, military and LE users can employ the AR-30A1 in a “pistol configuration” without its buttstock. ArmaLite’s highly efficient muzzle brake makes firing, even in the pistol configuration, comfortable.
30A1BT300 (The target AR-30A1 in .300 Win Mag)

Caliber: .300 Win Mag
Barrel: 24″ Chrome Moly
Rifling Twist: 1:10
Muzzle Device: Muzzle Brake
Trigger: Single Stage
Stock: Adjustable Cheek Piece (height) & Buttstock (length)
Overall Length: 46.1″ – 48.1”
Length of Pull: 13.6” – 15.6”
Weight: 14.5 lbs.
Included with Rifle: 1 Five Round Magazine, Detachable Sight Rail and Accessory Rails, Hard Case, Sling, Owner’s Manual
30A1BT338 (The target AR-30A1 in .338 Lapua)

Caliber: .338 Lapua
Barrel: 26″ Chrome Moly
Rifling Twist: 1:10
Muzzle Device: Muzzle Brake
Trigger: Single Stage
Stock: Adjustable Cheek Piece (height) & Buttstock (length)
Overall Length: 48.1″ – 50.1”
Length of Pull: 13.6” – 15.6”
Weight: 15.3 Lbs. Included with Rifle: 1 Five Round Magazine, Detachable Sight Rail and Accessory Rails, Hard Case, Sling, Owner’s Manual
FOR MORE ON THE AR-30A1, GO TO http://www.armalite.com/Categories.aspx?Category=d4543129-c82e-4fc9-bb4d-213664c7b055

ABOUT ARMALITE:
ArmaLite has one of the broadest product lines in the firearms industry. We manufacture and sell semiautomatic rifles in a variety of calibers including 5.56mm and 7.62mm, long range super-accurate bolt action rifles in calibers including .300 Winchester Magnum, .338 Lapua, .50 BMG and classic 9mm pistols. Visit ArmaLite at www.armalite.com