REVIEW: Versacarry

You may have noticed that my installment of the versacarry review trilogy has been somewhat delayed. This certainly isn’t a result of versacarry making a complicated or difficult to use product, but instead from my lack of a concealed handgun license. I was hoping to have completed my licensing course and have some real world experience with the holster before I made my conclusive review of the product, but due to a lack of funding on my part, and a but of a deadline for the review, here it goes.

If you haven’t seen the previous reviews, you may want to read through this before hand.

First off, I am very thankful that we got this product for review. It is different and interesting at the very least, and being able to work with the holster and get a good feel for how it feels and functions proved that it is much more than just a novel idea. The execution of this idea for a minimalistic holster is beautiful, simple, and effective.
The first thing I noticed about this holster was exactly how little material it consists of. Its just so small. If I hadn’t read up on it before it was put in my hands, I wouldn’t have known what to do with it. The size of the whole package is excellent, but that actually wasn’t my favorite part. As cool as it is to have a few more millimeters shaved off that little bulge my M&P .40 makes on my waist, the best and most important part of the versacarry is how easy and reliable it is on the draw.
Now I am in no capacity and expert on holsters or concealed carry situations/requirements, but I do know a thing or two about efficiency and consistency. the clasp on versacarry holsters is a stout one. With an angled protrusion on its end the clip stayed rather firmly in place as I drew repeatedly from my jeans even without a belt on. Using it like it was intended; with a belt in place , the versacarry is going nowhere fast and let my pistol slide out very smoothly very consistently.
Argh. I just remembered another test I haven’t gotten time to run yet. As soon as I get my hands on a linear scale I will be measuring and posting exactly how firmly the versacarry holds my M&P .40 and hopefully a few other handguns in place. For now just rest assured that for such little contact area between the holster and the firearm, it is a comfortably tight fit. I wouldn’t ever worry about any unwanted movement or the possibility of slipping out.
The only problem I see with the versacarry, is the potential difficulty of training with it. Not being able to re-settle the pistol on your versacarry without removing it from your pants would make repeated drawing a bit more tedious. Obviously in a real life situation use of a versacarry only necessitates one draw.
All in all, I like it quite a lot, and fully intend on using versacarry as soon as I am licensed.

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